Category Archives: Station Update

What’s coming up from APM June 6-13

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace PM

Week of June 7

  • Kai talks with Mohamed El-Erian, President of Queens’ College and former CEO of PIMCO, about his view of the recovery.
  • The U.S. is facing record-setting job openings, with restaurants, hotels and retail facing huge labor shortages. Meanwhile, employees are hopping to new jobs in search of better pay, personal fulfilment or work-life balance. And all of this means some businesses are facing their biggest losses of institutional knowledge ever. How much does this cost? Economists actually have numbers. Marketplace’s Kristin Schwab reports.

Marketplace Tech

  • Throughout the summer, Marketplace Tech will have a rotating schedule of hosts during the summer months. Amy Scott will host June 1-25.
  • June 7: Google national hospital chain HCA Healthcare are working together to create healthcare algorithms using patient records. What is the promise of new health care tools like that and what are the risks for misuse? Guest: Deven McGraw, an attorney who was formerly a HIPAA enforcer at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
  • June 10: World of Concrete is the first convention to be held in Vegas since the pandemic began. And it’s coming right on the cusp of what could become an infrastructure bonanza. But concrete is tricky—while it’s vital, it’s also a huge contributor to climate change. Guest: Marketplace reporter Matt Levin, who will be at the show.

The Daily

June 4: Day X, Episode Two – The case of Franco A, the German military officer accused of terrorism charges, has come to represent something investigators are increasingly worried about—that Day X is a call for action, a pretext for terrorism, or worse, a coup. That’s why prosecutors say Franco A picked the targets that he did. In this episode, Katrin Bennhold, the Times’ Berlin bureau chief, speaks with two of those alleged targets.

On Point

June 7: Part 3 of our series, “Amazon: The Prime Effect” will investigate the Amazon Marketplace, the e-commerce platform that enables millions of retailers to sell their products. Some retailers say the platform has been a key part of their success. But for others, it has become an existential threat. We hear from those retailers and Amazon’s VP for Customer Trust, Dharmesh Mehta.


Classical

Performance Today

June 10: Performance Today will feature Young Artist in Residence Annie Jacobs-Perkins, who studies cello at the New England Conservatory of Music.


Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes listeners back to the sounds and events of a specific year.

June 11 – 1982:

The year Bruce Springsteen went back to the basics with his Nebraska album. Duran Duran emerged from across the Atlantic with their debut album and Prince dropped his biggest album yet while Grandmaster Flash brought Hip Hop to a new audience. Marvin Gaye made the blueprint for slow jams, final albums came from Roxy Music and the original English Beat, and The Clash had a hit in the states.

Outside the world of music E.T was the top film and 60 Minutes was the number one T.V show. The sitcom Cheers hit the small screen and Time’s Man of the Year was The Computer. You probably played video games, may have tried to breakdance or moonwalk, and you might have found a Jane Fonda workout video tape in your Christmas stocking.

The Splendid Table

NEW episode – June 11:

  • This week, we’re looking at what June is like in three spectacular parts of the country. We talk about summer in the South with Matthew Raiford, author of Bress ‘N’ Nyam: Gullah Geechee Recipes from a Sixth-Generation Farmer
  • We head to the expanse of Alaska with salmon fisherwoman and conservationist Melanie Brown.
  • We turn to the mountains of Appalachia with Ronni Lundy the author of the award-winning Victuals: An Appalachian Journey, with Recipes.

What’s coming up from APM May 31 – June 6

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace PM

Week of May 31

  • Kai talks with India Hynes, CEO of Vinotemp about supply chain and distribution challenges in the wine market.
  • In the years after the mass layoffs of the 1980s, and again after the Great Recession, we learned how damaging long-term unemployment can be for individuals, families, and communities. There have been strategies and programs developed for peer support, career counselling, retraining, etc., Marketplace’s Mitchell Hartman looks at workforce experts are proposing to help the pandemic long-term unemployed.

Marketplace Tech

  • Throughout the summer, Marketplace Tech will have a rotating schedule of hosts during the summer months. Amy Scott will host June 1-25.
  • May 31 (encore): Artificial intelligence is supposed to make the most educated guesses, working with all the possible data to identify patterns and people and things. But what happens when the data and the code created by humans come with all of our human biases? Guest: Joy Buolamwini researches bias in algorithms at the MIT Media Lab, and her work is featured in a new Netflix documentary called Coded Bias.
  • June 1: As President Biden calls global leaders to go all in on climate change, misinformation on climate change on Facebook – and other social media platforms – will also be a challenge to tackle. Guest: Erin McAweeney, from the data firm Graphika.

The Daily

  • Day X Series: Starting May 28, and continuing over the next several Fridays, The Daily will feature a series on the rise of far-right extremism in Germany and its implications around the world. The series, called Day X, will be hosted by Katrin Bennhold, The New York Times’ Berlin bureau chief, though the top, rejoinder and bottom of the show will still be voiced by Michael Barbaro. The series will be at least 5 episodes long, but may be extended by 1-2 episodes to accommodate the full story for radio audiences.
  • May 28: Day X, Episode One – The story of Franco A., the military officer who faked his identity and plotted an attack that he hoped would be blamed on refugees and migrants, was widely publicized in the German press. Then reports emerged that he wasn’t alone — that soldiers and police officers across the country were organizing via encrypted messages. They were preparing for the day they believed democracy would collapse, a day they called Day X. In this episode, we ask: Just how dangerous are they?
  • June 4: Day X, Episode Two – The case of Franco A., the German military officer accused of terrorism charges, has come to represent something investigators are increasingly worried about – that Day X is a call for action, a pretext for terrorism, or worse, a coup. That’s why prosecutors say Franco A. picked the targets that he did. In this episode, Katrin Bennhold, the Times’ Berlin bureau chief, speaks with two of those alleged targets.
  • Over the next few months, Astead Herndon, Sabrina Tavernise and Kevin Roose will be mixed in with Michael as occasional guest hosts of The Daily. Michael will continue to voice the billboard of the show, even when the guest host leads the conversation with a reporter.

On Point

June 1: Nobel Prize-winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman joins Meghna Chakrabarti for a discussion about how the distraction of noise impacts decision-making, and what decision-makers can do about it.


Classical

Performance Today

May 31: Listeners will hear music for Memorial Day including Mikis Theodorakis’ One Day in May, Hymn to the Fallen by John Williams and American Folk Songs by Ruth Crawford Seeger.


Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes listeners back to the sounds and events of a specific year.

June 4 – 1962:

The year Ray Charles bridged the gap in music with his Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music. Bob Dylan and the Beach Boys released their first albums, and across the pond the Beatles released their first single. Surf music was king with big songs from the Surfaris and Dick Dale, Booker T and the MG’s recorded one of the most popular instrumentals in recorded music history, George Jones and Patsy Cline ruled country radio and if you were dancing, you were probably doing the Twist to songs by Sam Cooke or Isley Brothers.

Outside the world of music it was the year of the Cuban Missile Crisis, Jackie Robinson became the first Black American elected to The Baseball Hall of Fame, the first James Bond film, Dr. No, hit the big screen and The Beverly Hillbillies hit the TV and quickly became the most popular show of the year.

The Splendid Table

Encore episode – June 4: Madhur Jaffrey

  • We’re spending the hour with the legendary award-winning food writer and actress Madhur Jaffrey. Madhur has been writing about Indian food and cooking for over 40 years and is considered one of the world’s foremost authorities.

What’s coming up from APM May 24-30

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace PM

Week of May 24

  • Kai tours a centralized ghost kitchen in Pasadena, CA operated by Kitchen United.
  • Kai talks with Ellen Weinreb of the Weinreb Group about how the role of Chief Sustainability Officers is changing.

Marketplace Tech

  • May 24: Last year, tech companies made big promises about improving their culture. Microsoft, for example, said it would spend $150M on diversity efforts and would double the number of Black leaders by 2025; Google said it would increase Black leaders by 30% by 2025. What concrete steps to improve company culture are recommended, and did the big tech companies take them?
  • May 25: Act One Ventures partner Alejandro Guerrero spearheaded an effort last year for venture capitalists to commit to including diversity riders in their boilerplate contracts. Since then, 50 firms are using the rider, up from 10, and it’s been used in hundreds of deals.

On Point

  • Boston Globe senior opinion writer Kimberly Atkins hosts On Point May 24-26, and WBUR senior political reporter Anthony Brooks hosts May 27-28.
  • May 24: As we mark one year since the murder of George Floyd, historian Elizabeth Hinton joins The Boston Globe’s Kimberly Atkins to talk about her call for a sweeping reconsideration of how we think about racial unrest in America. Hinton is the author of a new book America on Fire: The Untold History of Police Violence and Black Rebellion Since the 1960s.
  • May 27: U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona speaks with WBUR’s Anthony Brooks about America’s school reopening challenges. What will ‘back to school’ look like across the U.S.?

Classical

Performance Today

May 26: Valerie Kahler (in for Fred Child) will read listeners’ dedications to 2021 graduates throughout the Performance Today broadcast.


Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes listeners back to the sounds and events of a specific year.

May 28 – 1995:

Foo Fighters dropped their debut (though it was more of a Dave Grohl solo album), there were firsts from D’Angelo & the band Garbage., and Oasis and Alanis Morrissette were 2 of the year’s phenoms. Bjork revived a song from 1951 for her biggest hit yet, the alt-country movement was thriving with debuts from both Wilco and Son Volt and Tracy Chapman had a bluesy hit.

Outside the world of music, Cal Ripken Jr. breaks Lou Gehrig’s consecutive games played record, the Houston Rockets featuring Clyde Drexler & Hakeem Olajuwon swept Orlando for the NBA title, it was the Dallas Cowboys over the Pittsburgh Steelers to win Super Bowl #30, and the “Trial of the Century” involving O.J. Simpson begins. ER was the top show on TV, and Batman Forever starring Val Kilmer was the top film.

The Splendid Table

Encore episode – May 28: Kitchen tools

  • Tim Hayward tells us about the tools that have surprisingly changed our lives. His book is The Modern Kitchen.
  • Quintin Middleton of Middleton Made Knives shares how he designs a great chef’s knife.
  • We talk to Ruth Ades-Laurent about her father, the legendary Joseph Ades, also known as the “Gentleman Peeler” who made millions selling vegetable peelers on the streets of New York City
  • America’s Test Kitchen brings us the best of their reader’s kitchen tool hacks.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

What’s coming up from APM May 17-23

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Week of May 17

Marketplace PM

  • Kai talks with Daniel Kahneman about his new book Noise: A flaw in human judgement.
  • When we talk about economic data on the show, we often use the term “household,” which is defined by the federal government as one or more people who occupy a housing unit. But the way that data is collected – the questions asked, the responses allowed – has changed over time. For instance, in the 1970 Census, only a man could be designated the “Head of the Household.” Until 2020, the Census did not include categories for same-sex couples living in the same home. Marketplace’s Marielle Segarra unpacks the term “household” – where it comes from, how the definition has changed, who it still excludes, and why that matters.

Marketplace Tech

  • Amy Scott hosts the program May 17-18.
  • May 17: Tech companies are increasingly working on “vocal profiling,” the idea that someone’s voice reveals information about their emotions, personality, weight, race, illness and more. Guest: Joseph Turow, author of The Voice Catchers: How Marketers Listen In to Exploit Your Feelings, Your Privacy, and Your Wallet.

On Point

  • May 17: Republican Representative Liz Cheney has described former President Donald Trump and his loyalists as being “at war with the constitution.” Renowned constitutional law scholar Akhil Reed Amar speaks with host Meghna Chakrabarti about the enduring power of the constitution. He says it’s more than a document, it’s a ‘conversation.’ Akhil Reed Amar is the author of The Words That Made Us: America’s Constitutional Conversation, 1760-1840.
  • May 18: The cyber-attack on Colonial Pipeline has exposed, once again, how vulnerable our key infrastructure is to cyber-attack. It has also revealed fundamental flaws in the public-private partnerships we rely on for much of this country’s infrastructure. We assess President Biden’s executive order aimed at strengthening the United States’ defenses by encouraging private companies to practice better cybersecurity, or risk being locked out of federal contracts.
  • May 19: ‘Help Wanted’ signs in restaurant windows seem commonplace these days. Some restaurant owners blame their worker shortage on high unemployment benefit payments that they say make not working more attractive than working. But some former restaurant workers say they don’t want to go back to jobs that are poorly paid and with brutal hours and working conditions. Is this a moment of reckoning for the restaurant industry?

Classical

Performance Today

  • May 20: Performance Today will feature the first ever tubist as a Young Artist in Residence! Cristina Cutts-Dougherty studies tuba at the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia.
  • A year ago, when millions of graduates didn’t have in-person ceremonies, Performance Today created an hour of programming to honor graduates’ accomplishments. The program was popular, so the feature is returning for 2021. Starting May 19, Fred Child will ask listeners for a short message honoring a 2021 graduate in their life, and Fred will read them on the show May 26.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes listeners back to the sounds and events of a specific year.

May 21 – 1970:

The Beatles made it official and broke up, but left us a nice parting gift, a final album and lots of solo material. We lost guitar legend Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin 2 weeks apart, both at age 27. Santana was becoming a certified guitar hero after the release of Abraxas, Van Morrison released his most beloved album, Edwin Starr dropped one of the first protest songs on the Motown label, and Joni Mitchell was busy writing an environmental anthem and a song for Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young.

Outside the work of music, the New York Knicks won the NBA championship, the Baltimore Orioles won the World Series, and the Colts won the Super Bowl in the year that Monday Night Football debuted. Marcus Welby MD was the most popular show on the TV, The Flip Wilson show was #2, and the first Earth Day was celebrated.

The Splendid Table

Encore episode – May 21: Persian food

  • Samin Nosrat, author of Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat, tells us why Persian cooks are so obsessed with fresh herbs.
  • Naz Deravian, author of Bottom of the Pot, has a tale of tahdig and home
  • Najmieh Batmanglij, author of Cooking in Iran, has a report on what people are cooking in modern-day Iran.
  • Chef/founder of Moosh NYC, Behzad Jamshidi, teaches Francis a classic recipe for Ghaliyeh Mahi, a fish stew with fenugreek.

What’s coming up from APM May 10-16

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Week of May 10

Marketplace PM

  • Kai talks with Broadway producer Eva Price about preparing for reopening.
  • The housing market in the US has not waned during the pandemic. Nor has it over in China, where real estate investment during the pandemic year of 2020 still rose at a robust rate of 7% from a year earlier. That’s partly because there are limited investment options for Chinese citizens, and because property is seen as the safest bet no matter what the health of the broader economy is. Our China correspondent Jennifer Pak reports from the central Chinese city of Zhengzhou.

Marketplace Tech

  • May 10: Facebook created a handpicked board to advise it on content decisions – and it turned to that board to weigh in on whether to keep Donald Trump off the platform. What other companies might decide to turn to outside groups to set standards for moderating content?
  • May 11: China is rolling out a digital version of its currency, the yuan. What’s the difference between a government-issued digital currency and an open-source cryptocurrency, and what are the implications for tracking transactions? Guest: Jennifer Pak, Marketplace’s China correspondent.
  • May 14: Amy Scott hosts Marketplace Tech.

On Point

  • May 10: Ian Manuel went to prison for shooting a woman during a robbery gone awry. He was 13 years old at the time of the incident. He spent nearly 18 years in solitary confinement. He left prison about 5 years ago, with the help of lawyer and social justice activist Bryan Stevenson. They join us to share Manuel’s story and understand the consequences of the ongoing use of solitary confinement in the U.S.
  • May 11: The Biden administration says that children over 12 will be eligible for the Pfizer vaccine as soon as this week. But polls show that many parents are reluctant to get their children vaccinated. We ask whether vaccinating children should be a priority and find out what kind of clinical trials have been undertaken.
  • May 13: In part two of our series, Amazon: The Prime Effect, we ask, ‘Who is Jeff Bezos?’ If you go to relentless.com you will be redirected to Amazon.com. In this hour, we’ll explore Jeff Bezos’s relentless pursuit of universality. Choosing books as Amazon’s first product, because there are more books to sell than any other product, is a telling tale of how Bezos grew Amazon into a global empire.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes listeners back to the sounds and events of a specific year.

May 14 – 2002:

It was a big year for Norah Jones, whose Come Away With Me album cleaned up by winning 5 Grammy Awards. Wilco delivered the most critically acclaimed album of their career with Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, Missy Elliot worked it, Justin Timberlake went solo and The Eminem Show was the biggest selling album of the year. File sharing and Napster were changing music consumption, and it was the Bush Presidency and the wind-up to the Iraq War.

The Splendid Table

Encore episode – May 14: Cheese

  • We go behind the scenes of the wacky and wild competition The Cheesemonger Invitational. From blind -tasting and aroma tests to pairing and wrapping and weighing, who knew?
  • Cheesemonger Greselda Powell of Murray’s Cheese in NYC takes Francis under her wing to teach him how to identify cheese just by smell.
  • Jack Bishop of America’s Test Kitchen brings us some hard truths about keeping cheese at home.
  • Cheese expert Tia Keenan teams up with Francis to take your calls.

Timely Selections

Small Change: Money Stories from the Neighborhood

One hour

April 26, 2021 – June 4, 2021

Small change: Money Stories from the Neighborhood is an audio hour highlighting smart, practical and collaborative money skills developed by people living with lower and unstable incomes.

Hosts Chris Farrell and Twila Dang talk to community members who are redefining wealth, the value of community and the purpose of money. Money wisdom taught by the true experts –people who have learned from experience.

BBC Video Offer

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Visit the BBC Media Partner Centre to take advantage of this opportunity and increase your social media presence with consistent, shareable videos about activism, climate change, politics and more.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative

What’s coming up from APM May 3-9

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Week of May 3

Marketplace PM

  • Kai talks with Chris Hyams, CEO of Indeed about how hiring has changed during the pandemic and how the labor market is changing.
  • Kai talks with Danielle Dreilinger about her new book The Secret History of Home Economics.

Marketplace Tech

  • May 3: The United States is facing a critical shortage of cybersecurity professionals, both inside the federal government and in the private sector. How can the government re-think the way it recruits to fill these critical positions? Guest: Erin Weiss Kaya and Booz Allen Hamilton.
  • May 5–6: We sit down with the acting chair of the Federal Communications Commissions, Jessica Rosenworcel, for an interview that will be spread over two days. As the internet has become increasingly vital in this pandemic, the FCC has fallen behind in efforts to accurately map who has broadband access in this country and then get it to them. But there is also an unprecedented level of federal funding coming to states to build out networks.

On Point

  • May 4: Working from home has changed how we think about work – both the jobs we do, and even the trajectory of our careers. So what’s the lasting effect of pandemic-inspired remote working? For people in many fields, the economy is shifting from “people go to the jobs” to “the jobs go to the people.” Financial Times Global Finance Columnist Rana Foroohar joins us to explore that.
  • May 5: President Biden has called on Congress to pass the George Floyd George Floyd Justice in Policing Act by the end of May. The legislation would ban chokeholds and end qualified immunity for law enforcement — the legal protection for police officers that limits victims’ ability to sue for misconduct. We explore the history and practice of qualified immunity.
  • May 7: Stand by for the cicadas. Brood X (10) is about to emerge after 17 years underground any day now in about twelve states. Entomologist Jessica Ware from the American Museum of Natural History joins us with everything you need to know about this captivating phenomenon.

Classical

Performance Today

  • May 5: Performance Today will broadcast music for Cinco de Mayo.
  • May 6: Performance Today will broadcast the piece Seven Last Words of the Unarmed by Joel Thompson. In 2014 the composer took the last words of seven Black men killed by police to create an incredibly powerful choral/orchestral composition in their honor

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes listeners back to the sounds and events of a specific year.

May 7 – 1959:

Two of the best jazz albums ever were released: there was Dave Brubeck Quartet’s Take 5 and the Miles Davis album Kind of Blue. It was the year “The Day the Music Died” occurred, when the world lost Buddy Holly, The Big Bopper & Ritchie Valens, New Orleans artists like Fats Domino, Lloyd Price and Irma Thomas had big hits, and if you slow danced at the sock hop, it was probably to “Sleepwalk” by Santo and Johnny.

Outside the work of music: Ben-Hur was the biggest film of the year, Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone premiered on the small screen as did the western Rawhide, and it was the 1st year of the Grammys when The Chipmunks took home more statuettes than Frank Sinatra.

The Splendid Table

NEW episode – May 7: Mothers and kids who cook

  • We talk to chef Kwame Onwuachi and his mother, Jewel Robinson, about his upbringing and how her catering career inspired his love for cooking. Kwame is the author of the best-selling memoir Notes from a Young Black Chef.
  • Then, we eavesdrop on Caroline Shin and her mother, JoungJa Shin, talking about miyeok guk. It’s a traditional Korean birthday soup served to mothers after childbirth and on birthdays as a tribute to one’s mother. Caroline Shin is the founder of Cooking with Granny.
  • New York Times columnist Melissa Clark teams up with Francis to take your questions about the best recipes to cook on Mother’s Day.

Timely Selections

Call to Mind: Spotlight on Rethinking Mental Health Care

Two, one-hour long programs. Each hour can be aired separately or back-to-back

Program 1: April 24, 2021 – May 31, 2021
Program 2: April 25, 2021 – May 31, 2021

Rethinking Mental Health Care will present an honest critique of the nation’s mental health care shortcomings, while highlighting tangible solutions and models for improving access and quality of care. Hosted by Kimberly Adams of Marketplace, this two-part format will allow guests to deep dive into failures, challenges and opportunities, while also allowing people to question mental health experts to ground the issues in matters most pressing to the public.

BBC Video Offer

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Visit the BBC Media Partner Centre to take advantage of this opportunity and increase your social media presence with consistent, shareable videos about activism, climate change, politics and more.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

What’s coming up from APM April 26-30

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


Reminders

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Visit the BBC Media Partner Centre to take advantage of this opportunity and increase your social media presence with consistent, shareable videos about activism, climate change, politics and more.

For more information, please visit our website or contact your Station Relations Representative.


News

Marketplace

Week of April 26

Marketplace PM

  • Kai talks with April Hemmes, Iowa corn and soybean farmer, about planting and prices.
  • A Baltimore church has pledged to spend $500,000 in reparations over the next five years for its role in slavery and racial discrimination. Memorial Episcopal Church, in the tony neighborhood of Bolton Hill, was founded by slaveholders, and perpetuated housing segregation, redlining and disenfranchisement of Black voters for decades. One of its first contributions is to Black Women Build, to provide down payment assistance to the next three women to buy homes, and to help the organization purchase more abandoned properties to rehab. In this next story in our series The Block, Marketplace’s Amy Scott looks at the role churches played in segregation and how its effort is part of the larger reparations movement.

Marketplace Tech

  • April 26: The U.S. Department of Education has opened an investigation into the data-sharing practices between Florida’s Pasco County sheriff’s office and school district. Student grades, attendance, disciplinary records, and aspects of their home life were allegedly used to create a database of students “at-risk” of criminal activity, likely in violation of federal law. How private is all student data around the country? Guest: Amelia Vance, Future of Privacy Forum.

On Point

  • April 26: On Point launches a new series called Amazon: The Prime Effect, which will explore the myriad ways in which Amazon is shaping how we live and work today, as well as the role the company plays in the global economy. This series will continue into the spring and summer and will likely be bi-weekly – check APM Weekly ahead of time for specific dates and topics.
    • In the first part of this series, we’ll talk to Amazon biographer Brad Stone and technology in democracy expert Stacy Mitchell to understand a basic but complex question: What is Amazon? Understanding the structure of the company and how various parts of Amazon are leveraged to gain market power for other parts will lead us to questions about anticompetition practices and enforcement of federal antitrust laws. We’ll also look back to the Microsoft antitrust case of the late 90’s for insight, and parallels of how the government might handle Amazon today.
  • April 27: A look at new laws being proposed by legislatures across the country that will restrict the right to protest. Republican lawmakers in Oklahoma and Iowa have already passed bills granting immunity to drivers whose vehicles strike and injure protesters in public streets.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes you back to the sounds of a specific year with a carefully curated list of the best songs. Plus, he’ll invite you to reexamine some deeper cuts as we look back on what happened that year in music, pop culture and the world.

April 30 – 1998:

A year of excellent debuts from Tracy Chapman, Pixies and the band Living Colour. The Traveling Wilburys were launched – the group featured Bob Dylan, Tom Petty, Jeff Lynne, Roy Orbison & George Harrison…perhaps the greatest supergroup ever assembled. U2 were discovering the roots of American music on the album and film Rattle and Hum, Public Enemy released one of the most important albums of the year, Patti Smith released an anthem and Cowboy Junkies recorded an album in a church with only one microphone.

Outside the world of music, Magic, Kareem and the Los Angeles Lakers defeated the bad boys of Detroit in 7 games to win the NBA Championship, the film Rainman was one of the biggest of the year, and CDs outsold vinyl for the first time…but since then the tables have turned!

The Splendid Table

As The Splendid Table continues to take listener home cooking questions, please follow the program’s updates on Twitter and encourage listeners to send in their questions as voice memos to contact@splendidtable.org, or via phone at 800-537-5252.  

Encore episode – April 30:

  • We’re taking on culinary projects this week, from paella on the grill with America’s Test Kitchen to building a community oven in a town square to the ethos of whole hog BBQ with Rodney Scott of Rodney Scott’s Barbecue in Charleston.
  • Francis has never forgotten a dish made by Upland’s chef Justin Smillie, a fresh tomato bread pudding brimming with garlic and fresh herbs and olive oil, and we talk Justin into giving Francis a lesson. Justin’s book is Slow Fires: Mastering the Way to Braise, Roast and Grill.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative

What’s coming up from APM April 19-25

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Week of April 19

Marketplace PM

  • Kai talks to Julie Wainwright, CEO of The RealReal about retail and real estate.
  • Kai talks with Chipotle CEO Brian Niccol about how the fast-casual industry is adapting to the post pandemic world.

Marketplace Tech

  • April 19: Two dozen states are considering right to repair bills – laws that would allow consumers to fix the products they buy without charging fees to manufacturers or only using certified technicians. Guest: Kyle Wiens, CEO of iFixit.
  • April 20: The global semiconductor chip shortage shows no signs of abating until at least 2023. How will this change consumer behavior? Maybe we don’t need that internet-connected toothbrush after all.

On Point

The Boston Globe’s Kimberly Atkins hosts April 19-23

  • April 19: Corporate America is taking a stand against voting restrictions. More than 100 CEOs signed a letter published in the New York Times to oppose restrictive election laws proposed in states like Georgia; but other big-name companies did not. On Point assesses the state of corporate activism in the U.S. in 2021.
  • April 20: After the pause in the distribution of the Johnson and Johnson COVID-19 vaccine and polling showing consistent vaccine hesitancy, we explore the consequences of those events and efforts to tackle persistent vaccine myths.
  • April 22: As President Biden calls on world leaders to make climate commitments and re-prioritize action to tackle climate change, we speak with teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg about her list of priorities.

Classical

Performance Today

  • April 21-23: Elena See will host Performance Today.
  • April 22: Listeners will hear music for Earth Day.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes you back to the sounds of a specific year with a carefully curated list of the best songs. Plus, he’ll invite you to reexamine some deeper cuts as we look back on what happened that year in music, pop culture and the world.

April 23 – 2007:

Both MIA & Kanye West had big tunes featuring prominent samples, and Robert Plant and Alison Krauss collaborated on the Raising Sand album. Radiohead turned the music business on its head by using a pay what you want business model on their In Rainbows album, The White Stripes made their final studio album, while Bon Iver released its debut record in the north woods of Wisconsin. Mavis Staples revisited some of the Civil Rights anthems of the 50’s and 60’s, and Arcade Fire released its highly anticipated 2nd album.

Outside the world of music, Al Gore won the Nobel Peace Prize, The New England Patriots ran the table, going undefeated 2007, but lost to the Giants in the Super Bowl in early 08. The San Antonio Spurs swept Lebron and the Cleveland Cavaliers to win the NBA title, Mad Men debuted and popularized cocktail culture and The Simpsons became movie stars.

The Splendid Table

As The Splendid Table continues to take listener home cooking questions, please follow the program’s updates on Twitter and encourage listeners to send in their questions as voice memos to contact@splendidtable.org, or via phone at 800-537-5252.  

NEW episode – April 23:

  • We head into the food of the Eastern Mediterranean with Yasmin Khan, author of Ripe Figs, Recipes and Stories from Turkey, Greece and Cyprus.
  • Then we head to the Arab world with Palestinian writer Reem Kassis and her new book Arabesque, Contemporary Recipes from the Arab World.

Questions? Please Contact your Station Representative

What’s coming up from APM April 12-18

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Week of April 12

Marketplace PM

  • Kai checks back in with our economic historian panel – this time, a look at pent up demand following a recession, and the idea of a repeat of the roaring 20s.
  • The QR code isn’t new to Americans. From time to time before Covid, we used our phones to scan those funny looking square things. But the pandemic made it mainstream, as a contactless way to pull up menus and order food. By one measure, half the eateries in the country adopted some form of QR code during the pandemic. Marketplace’s Scott Tong looks at the future of QR codes.

Marketplace Tech

  • Meghan McCarty Carino hosts the program on April 12, with Molly Wood hosting April 13-16.
  • April 12: When we talk about the spread of false information on the internet, the discussion is often focused on what the platforms can do to stop its spread. But there are tools that consumers can use to figure out what is true and what is not. Helen Lee Bouygues [BWEEG] is the founder and President of the Reboot Foundation, an organization aimed at increasing people’s long-term critical thinking skills and media consumption habits.
  • April 16: Facebook and other social media companies are facing criticism for allowing too much disinformation on their platforms about things like elections and COVID-19 vaccines. And not only in English – some critics say the problem is worse in other languages. As Rachael Myrow of KQED reports, according to at least one study by the human rights non-profit Avaaz, just 29 percent of misinformation in Spanish is flagged on Facebook, compared to 70 percent of comparable material in English.

On Point

  • April 12: It’s hard to avoid how polarized and divided our national politics has become….and those divisions are not just confined to politics. Sometimes it seems like it’s an us and them world. We don’t just disagree; we are in what New York Times bestselling author and award-winning journalist Amanda Ripley calls, a state of “high conflict.” Ripley joins us to talk about her research into how good people get captured by high conflict—and how they break free.
  • April 13: The Biden administration sees China as its top geo-political rival, but also a partner when it comes to issues like fighting climate change and dealing with North Korea. A high-level meeting between the US and China broke out into a very undiplomatic war of words last month. What does that indicate about the two super-powers level of mistrust and understanding? On Point dedicates its hour to better understand China’s motives and long-term goals as we ask the question: what does China want?
  • April 14: New surveys indicate Americans’ membership in communities of worship has declined sharply in recent years, with less than 50% of the country belonging to a church, synagogue or mosque. On Point looks into what’s filling the God-gap.

Classical

Performance Today

  • April 15: Performance Today will broadcast the interviews and performances with the second Young Artist in Residence – Randall Goosby, a violinist studying at Juilliard.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes you back to the sounds of a specific year with a carefully curated list of the best songs. Plus, he’ll invite you to reexamine some deeper cuts as we look back on what happened that year in music, pop culture and the world.

April 16 – 1965:  

It was a huge year for Bob Dylan, as he made not one but two classic albums in the same year. Motown was selling records like hotcakes with releases from The Supremes, the Miracles and others, and there were debuts from Sonny and Cher and The Byrds, who liked to record Dylan’s songs. Saxman John Coltrane released what many call one of the greatest albums of all time, the Beatles made their 2nd film, played to 55,000 at Shea Stadium and released the excellent Rubber Soul album, The Stones had a big hit that came to Keith Richards in his sleep, and Roger Miller wrote his biggest hit. Meanwhile, The Sound of Music was the biggest film of the year, and Bonanza was the most popular show on TV.

The Splendid Table

As The Splendid Table continues to take listener home cooking questions, please follow the program’s updates on Twitter and encourage listeners to send in their questions as voice memos to contact@splendidtable.org, or via phone at 800-537-5252.  

Encore episode – April 16:

  • This week we talk about the delicious species of sea urchin that we should be eating more of for the environment with chef/biochemist Ali Bouzari.
  • Rolando Beramendi, author of Autentico, introduces us to the Italian way with rice salads.
  • Best-selling author Alison Roman has some ideas to ramp up savory breakfasts.
  • America’s Test Kitchen brings us the perfect homemade falafel.

Questions? Please Contact your Station Representative.

What’s coming up from APM April 5-11

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.

News

Marketplace

Week of April 5 

Marketplace (PM) 

  • Vaccines are finally starting to get to ag-food-processing workers and families after major delays nationwide. Marketplace’s Mitchell Hartman reports from Yakima, WA on the role of a new federal effort to make it happen through federally funded safety net health care centers–the only free/low-cost health care available to this population. 

Marketplace Tech 

  • April 5: In some parts of the country the best service might not come from wired broadband, but instead from satellite providers.  Starlink, the satellite constellation being constructed by Elon Musk’s SpaceX, is now in beta, with more than 10,000 users, and there are a bunch of other companies working in the low-earth orbit satellite space as well. We talk with Sascha Segan, a lead analyst at PC Mag who’s been following Starlink. 
  • April 6-9: Meghan McCarty Carino hosts the program. 

On Point

  • April 5: A verdict in the trial of police officer Derek Chauvin will likely coincide with the 29th anniversary of the acquittal of four white police officers in the beating of Rodney King. That verdict led to the worst race riots in the U.S. in decades. On Point asks: what did we learn from that trial, the verdict, and the response; and what does it tell us about the moment we’re in now? 
  • April 6: The $1.9 trillion American Repair Plan includes $86 billion in grants to failing multi-employer pension plans for union workers. But what about the millions of low-income Americans who have no meaningful retirement savings and little hope of fully retiring? We explore a new idea from a duo of conservative and liberal economists, Kevin Hassett and Teresa Ghilarducci, that would use an existing government program to help the poor, and even build wealth. 
  • April 7: President Biden says he wants to pay for his ambitious infrastructure plans by raising corporate taxes. That does much more than reverse the tax cuts of his predecessor — it also offers a profoundly different set of priorities in what America needs to make it competitive, who reaps the rewards, and how that gets paid for. On Point will dive into this looming battle. 

Classical

Performance Today

April 8: Performance Today will mark the Days of Remembrance, a national commemoration of the Holocaust. One of the featured pieces of music will be I Will Not Remain Silent, a violin concerto by Bruce Adolphe inspired by the life and work of Rabbi Joachim Prinz. 

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

April 9 – 1998 

  • The year of massive selling The Miseducation of Lauren Hill, still her only album to date. Bass player turned DJ Fatboy Slim made his breakthrough, Neutral Milk Hotel made an indie rock masterpiece, and we first learned the word electronica on albums by Madonna, David Gray and others. The Twin Cities band Semisonic made closing time popular, The French band Air released its innovative debut and Goo Goo Dolls had the year’s biggest hit.
  • Outside the world of music, former wrestler Jesse Ventura wins the gubernatorial race in the state of Minnesota, MLB’s Cal Ripken’s record-breaking streak ends at 2,632 consecutive games played, Jordan and the Bulls pulled off their 2nd 3-peat of the decade and bowling was popular again, thanks to the Big Lebowski. Titanic dominated at the box office and the Oscars, Sex and the City debuted and after 9 seasons and 180 episodes, that show about nothing called Seinfeld ended. 

The Splendid Table

As The Splendid Table continues to take listener home cooking questions, please follow the program’s updates on Twitter and encourage listeners to send in their questions as voice memos to contact@splendidtable.org, or via phone at 800-537-5252.  

NEW episode – April 9: Seafood at home 

  • We talk to Jennifer Bushman, an aquaculture advocate and creator of Sea Pantry, a sustainable seafood initiative and resource for the home cook.  
  • And, we’ve invited Genevieve Ko, Senior Editor of The New York Times Cooking to help Francis take listeners’ fishy-related calls. 

Questions? Please Contact your Station Representative