What’s coming up from APM: June 14-20

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


Digital offer from the BBC World Service

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Previously, these videos were available exclusively through Facebook. Now these videos are available through the BBC Media Partner Centre and are shareable across social media sites including Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

Increase your social media presence with consistent, shareable videos about activism, climate change, politics and more. Find the latest selection of videos highlighted by the BBC and access the instructional guide and best practices guide to learn more.

Questions about how to access this offer? Contact your stations relations representative.


News

BBC World Service

Biden/Putin Summit

  • June 16: The BBC World Service will cover the summit between U.S. President Joe Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin live and in detail throughout its news programs – including The Newsroom, Newshour and BBC OS.
  • Washington correspondent Gary O’Donohue and Moscow correspondents Steve Rosenberg and Sarah Rainsford will be joined by Europe correspondents Mark Lown and Imogen Foulkes to bring reporting of the summit to radio and provide coverage throughout the event.

Marketplace

Marketplace PM

Week of June 14

  • Kai talks to Jennifer Feltham and Teodoro Diaz-Rodriguez, Jr, owners of Sonoratown taqueria in downtown L.A.
  • A significant subtext to the debilitating cyber hacks of late—including Colonial Pipeline—is the increase purchase of cyber insurance by companies. Firms buy these products to manage their risk; if they get hacked their insurers will be on the hook. One reality of this trend, as Marketplace’s Scott Tong reports: the more companies are covered, the more likely they’ll pay the ransoms demanded by the hackers—which emboldens the hackers.

Marketplace Tech

  • Throughout the summer, Marketplace Tech will have a rotating schedule of hosts during the summer months. Amy Scott will host June 1-25.
  • June 14: The building technology startup Katerra imploded this month, after it failed to deliver on its promise of making houses cheaper and faster than traditional building methods. It also had some accounting irregularities that contributed to its downfall. It’s the third big miss from venture capital firm SoftBank, which was also heavily invested in WeWork.
  • June 15: The 3D printed building startup Mighty Buildings has seen a 30% increase in demand in the past year. It has also become the first company to be certified under the building code to 3D print buildings – but they’re still pricey and could be hard to scale. How’s the company thinking of the future? We talk to one of the founders, Sam Ruben

The Daily

June 11: Day X, Episode Three – The case of Franco A, the German military officer accused of terrorism charges, has raised questions about why his alleged plot was only discovered by chance. In this episode, Katrin Bennhold speaks with Claudia Roth, a prominent member of the German parliament, who sees the case as a sign of a worrying pattern: German authorities turning a blind eye to the far right.

On Point

  • June 14: Wednesday’s summit in Geneva marks U.S. President Joe Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin’s first face-to-face meeting since Biden took office.  Ahead of the summit, we ask: What does Putin want from his meeting with Biden? We’ll learn all about Putin’s playbook and the future of U.S.-Russia relations. 
  • June 16: Columbia Law professor Jamal Greene joins Meghna Chakrabarti to talk about why conflicts in American society are often framed as being about competing rights, which rules out compromise. Professor Greene calls for a re-framing of our disputes.

Classical

Performance Today

  • June 17: Performance Today will celebrate Pride, including an interview with cellist Andrew Yee, one of the founders of ChamberQUEER. This year’s ChamberQUEER festival will be virtual, but listeners will hear performances on PT.
  • June 18: Performance Today will celebrate Juneteenth with musical performances and audio essays by Meghann Oglesby, Jeffrey Yelverton and Tesfa Wondemagegnehu.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes listeners back to the sounds and events of a specific year.

June 18 – 2008:

Myspace was still a force, accelerating the careers of Adele and Fleet Foxes. In the indie-rock world, both MGMT & Vampire Weekend released debut albums. Coldplay hit #1 on both sides of the Atlantic, Kings of Leon’s album hit #1 in 10 countries and Beyonce’s ambitious double album Sasha Fierce hit the streets. TV on the Radio’s Dear Science was a critic’s favorite, and in the pop world both Lady Gaga & Katy Perry had two of the year’s biggest songs.

Outside the world of music, Slumdog Millionaire was one of the best films of the year and American Idol was the most popular show on TV. Cyclone Nargis hits Myanmar killing 130,000 people, Barack Obama became the USA’s first black president, and the US economy faced the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression.

The Splendid Table


Encore episode – June 18: Grilling

  • Chef Yia Vang of Union Hmong Kitchen in Minneapolis joins us to talk about the Hmong tradition of cooking over a fire.
  • North Carolina chef Ashley Christensen of Poole’s Diner has charmingly unusual ideas for grilling vegetables
  • Our dear friend John aka Doc Willoughby teams up with Francis to take your grilling questions.

Timely Selections

Fields of Wonder

One hour

May 27, 2021 – June 30, 2021

Join Andrea Blain and Cantus for a concert celebrating music composed by Black artists, primarily the song cycle of Margaret Bonds.

Brave

One hour

May 27, 2021 – June 30, 2021

Just in time for Father’s Day (Sunday, June 20), join Cantus for a live recorded concert featuring music that focuses on the idea of masculinity in our society.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Summer and Fall Specials from APM Celebrates

New specials highlight the ways Amazon has transformed our lives, debate the biggest questions of our time and feature patriotic classical specials in time for the Fourth of July.

Promote your special broadcasts with customizable digital ads for your website, social media and newsletters. Coming soon to the ‘Marketing Tools’ section of APM Celebrates program pages.

New for FY22, APM specials are available to all APM affiliates (BBC docs and specials are for BBC affiliates).

News

Amazon: The Prime Effect

Episode 1: July 2, 2021 – July 31, 2021
Episode 2: August 6, 2021 – August 31, 2021
Episode 3: September 3, 2021 – September 30, 2021
Three, one-hour long programs – each is stand alone

Amazon: The Prime Effect, from On Point, is an in-depth series exploring the myriad ways Amazon is changing the ways we shop, work and live. These three episodes will look at the company, it’s founder Jeff Bezos, and how Amazon has fundamentally changed the global economy

Munk Debates

July 14, 2021 – October 31, 2021
Three, one-hour long programs.

The Munk Debates brings together acclaimed thinkers around the world to tackle the big questions of our time. These three episodes will debate the usefulness of capitalism, the impact of religion, and the question of whether humankind’s best days lie ahead.

Windfall

July 20, 2021 – December 31, 2021
One hour

Windfall from NHPR’s award-winning podcast Outside/In investigates the launch of the American offshore wind energy industry, the political chicanery that has delayed it, and how past failures define future success at a time when the government is poised to take real action on climate change. Ultimately, this is a story about power: who has power, where does it come from, and who benefits.

Spotlight on Virtual Mental Health Care

August 13, 2021 – September 30, 2021
Three, one-hour long programs.

We explore how mental health care’s urgent pivot to new technologies fared during the pandemic’s critical stress test. Through interviews with expert clinicians and researchers, we will explore the fast-developing landscape of virtual mental health care — its advancements, and its challenges.

The Uncertain Hour from Marketplace

August 25, 2021 – October 31, 2021
One hour

When Jerry Vasquez realized he was making less than minimum wage after buying a franchise janitorial business with a company called Jan-Pro, he joined fellow franchisees to sue the company, saying they’d been misclassified as independent contractors when they should have been employees. But the argument over what defines an employee has a long and strange legal history. We’ll dive in and explore the origins of the federal minimum wage, why lawmakers wrote the law as broadly as they did, whom it applied to and whom it excluded.

In Deep: one city’s year of climate chaos

August 27, 2021 – November 30, 2021
One hour

This documentary special will chronicle the effects of multiple disasters on one city in southwest Louisiana over the course of a year, putting the events into context through the lenses of climate change and equity.

Classical

Fourth of July with the Tabernacle Choir at Temple Square (encore)

July 1, 2021 – July 17, 2021
One hour

Join Julie Amacher for an hour of traditional, patriotic choral music performed by the world-renowned Tabernacle Choir and Orchestra at Temple Square.

To Honor and Inspire (encore)

July 1, 2021 – July 17, 2021
One hour

Andrea Blain hosts this patriotic encore special, featuring performances by the United States Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine bands. Audiences will be moved and uplifted by an hour of music, including marches by Sousa, Jewell and Gould, and classical works by Copland, Saint-Saens and Holst.

Wondrous Strange

July 14, 2021 – August 11, 2021
One hour

Whether it’s the theremin, the octobass or the contrabass flute, this special will explore instruments that are off the beaten track and the musicians that play them. Audiences will hear commentary about the instruments along with music recordings that showcase their unique sound.

Time Signatures

August 3, 2021 – August 31, 2021
One hour

This is a unique celebration of classical music by and for people who have been fortunate to live into their ‘senior’ years – a positive and sometimes surprising look at the power of classical music in the context of older age.

Back to School at the Movies (encore)

August 19, 2021 – September 30, 2021
One hour

An hour of great movie music from films that celebrate school days. Goodbye, Mr. Chips, Dead Poet’s Society, Shadowlands, Mr. Holland’s Opus and more.

Contact your Station Representative to learn more about APM Celebrates, our unique package of seasonal programs and more.

BBC Leadership Announcements:

The BBC’s blueprint for transformational changes announced earlier this spring and a larger restructuring of BBC news leaders are currently underway and we’d like to share a few recent appointments and transitions. 

  • Liliane Landor has been appointed as Senior Controller of BBC News International Services, responsible for the BBC’s global news strategy. In addition to other language services and BBC Monitoring, Landor will oversee the BBC World Service English. Landor has a wealth of experience in the BBC World Service and also founded the BBC’s staff network, Global Women in News. 
  • Mary Hockaday, acting News International Services Director and previous Controller for World Service English, has decided to leave the BBC later this year. She has had a distinguished career at the BBC, leading editorial teams and services for UK and global audiences.  
  • John Zilkha has been appointed the role of News Controller for World Service English.  Zilkha is currently the Senior Project Director for leading changes across the BBC newsroom. Before taking on this role, Zilkha oversaw the development and output of live and continuous news on TV and radio, led 24/7 ad Digital News, the Economics and Business Unit and was the acting editor of Newshour. 

Both Landor and Zilkha will begin their new roles this fall. We will continue to communicate with you as we continue to learn more about how changes may affect radio distribution in the U.S.  

What’s coming up from APM June 6-13

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace PM

Week of June 7

  • Kai talks with Mohamed El-Erian, President of Queens’ College and former CEO of PIMCO, about his view of the recovery.
  • The U.S. is facing record-setting job openings, with restaurants, hotels and retail facing huge labor shortages. Meanwhile, employees are hopping to new jobs in search of better pay, personal fulfilment or work-life balance. And all of this means some businesses are facing their biggest losses of institutional knowledge ever. How much does this cost? Economists actually have numbers. Marketplace’s Kristin Schwab reports.

Marketplace Tech

  • Throughout the summer, Marketplace Tech will have a rotating schedule of hosts during the summer months. Amy Scott will host June 1-25.
  • June 7: Google national hospital chain HCA Healthcare are working together to create healthcare algorithms using patient records. What is the promise of new health care tools like that and what are the risks for misuse? Guest: Deven McGraw, an attorney who was formerly a HIPAA enforcer at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
  • June 10: World of Concrete is the first convention to be held in Vegas since the pandemic began. And it’s coming right on the cusp of what could become an infrastructure bonanza. But concrete is tricky—while it’s vital, it’s also a huge contributor to climate change. Guest: Marketplace reporter Matt Levin, who will be at the show.

The Daily

June 4: Day X, Episode Two – The case of Franco A, the German military officer accused of terrorism charges, has come to represent something investigators are increasingly worried about—that Day X is a call for action, a pretext for terrorism, or worse, a coup. That’s why prosecutors say Franco A picked the targets that he did. In this episode, Katrin Bennhold, the Times’ Berlin bureau chief, speaks with two of those alleged targets.

On Point

June 7: Part 3 of our series, “Amazon: The Prime Effect” will investigate the Amazon Marketplace, the e-commerce platform that enables millions of retailers to sell their products. Some retailers say the platform has been a key part of their success. But for others, it has become an existential threat. We hear from those retailers and Amazon’s VP for Customer Trust, Dharmesh Mehta.


Classical

Performance Today

June 10: Performance Today will feature Young Artist in Residence Annie Jacobs-Perkins, who studies cello at the New England Conservatory of Music.


Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes listeners back to the sounds and events of a specific year.

June 11 – 1982:

The year Bruce Springsteen went back to the basics with his Nebraska album. Duran Duran emerged from across the Atlantic with their debut album and Prince dropped his biggest album yet while Grandmaster Flash brought Hip Hop to a new audience. Marvin Gaye made the blueprint for slow jams, final albums came from Roxy Music and the original English Beat, and The Clash had a hit in the states.

Outside the world of music E.T was the top film and 60 Minutes was the number one T.V show. The sitcom Cheers hit the small screen and Time’s Man of the Year was The Computer. You probably played video games, may have tried to breakdance or moonwalk, and you might have found a Jane Fonda workout video tape in your Christmas stocking.

The Splendid Table

NEW episode – June 11:

  • This week, we’re looking at what June is like in three spectacular parts of the country. We talk about summer in the South with Matthew Raiford, author of Bress ‘N’ Nyam: Gullah Geechee Recipes from a Sixth-Generation Farmer
  • We head to the expanse of Alaska with salmon fisherwoman and conservationist Melanie Brown.
  • We turn to the mountains of Appalachia with Ronni Lundy the author of the award-winning Victuals: An Appalachian Journey, with Recipes.

What’s coming up from APM May 31 – June 6

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace PM

Week of May 31

  • Kai talks with India Hynes, CEO of Vinotemp about supply chain and distribution challenges in the wine market.
  • In the years after the mass layoffs of the 1980s, and again after the Great Recession, we learned how damaging long-term unemployment can be for individuals, families, and communities. There have been strategies and programs developed for peer support, career counselling, retraining, etc., Marketplace’s Mitchell Hartman looks at workforce experts are proposing to help the pandemic long-term unemployed.

Marketplace Tech

  • Throughout the summer, Marketplace Tech will have a rotating schedule of hosts during the summer months. Amy Scott will host June 1-25.
  • May 31 (encore): Artificial intelligence is supposed to make the most educated guesses, working with all the possible data to identify patterns and people and things. But what happens when the data and the code created by humans come with all of our human biases? Guest: Joy Buolamwini researches bias in algorithms at the MIT Media Lab, and her work is featured in a new Netflix documentary called Coded Bias.
  • June 1: As President Biden calls global leaders to go all in on climate change, misinformation on climate change on Facebook – and other social media platforms – will also be a challenge to tackle. Guest: Erin McAweeney, from the data firm Graphika.

The Daily

  • Day X Series: Starting May 28, and continuing over the next several Fridays, The Daily will feature a series on the rise of far-right extremism in Germany and its implications around the world. The series, called Day X, will be hosted by Katrin Bennhold, The New York Times’ Berlin bureau chief, though the top, rejoinder and bottom of the show will still be voiced by Michael Barbaro. The series will be at least 5 episodes long, but may be extended by 1-2 episodes to accommodate the full story for radio audiences.
  • May 28: Day X, Episode One – The story of Franco A., the military officer who faked his identity and plotted an attack that he hoped would be blamed on refugees and migrants, was widely publicized in the German press. Then reports emerged that he wasn’t alone — that soldiers and police officers across the country were organizing via encrypted messages. They were preparing for the day they believed democracy would collapse, a day they called Day X. In this episode, we ask: Just how dangerous are they?
  • June 4: Day X, Episode Two – The case of Franco A., the German military officer accused of terrorism charges, has come to represent something investigators are increasingly worried about – that Day X is a call for action, a pretext for terrorism, or worse, a coup. That’s why prosecutors say Franco A. picked the targets that he did. In this episode, Katrin Bennhold, the Times’ Berlin bureau chief, speaks with two of those alleged targets.
  • Over the next few months, Astead Herndon, Sabrina Tavernise and Kevin Roose will be mixed in with Michael as occasional guest hosts of The Daily. Michael will continue to voice the billboard of the show, even when the guest host leads the conversation with a reporter.

On Point

June 1: Nobel Prize-winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman joins Meghna Chakrabarti for a discussion about how the distraction of noise impacts decision-making, and what decision-makers can do about it.


Classical

Performance Today

May 31: Listeners will hear music for Memorial Day including Mikis Theodorakis’ One Day in May, Hymn to the Fallen by John Williams and American Folk Songs by Ruth Crawford Seeger.


Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes listeners back to the sounds and events of a specific year.

June 4 – 1962:

The year Ray Charles bridged the gap in music with his Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music. Bob Dylan and the Beach Boys released their first albums, and across the pond the Beatles released their first single. Surf music was king with big songs from the Surfaris and Dick Dale, Booker T and the MG’s recorded one of the most popular instrumentals in recorded music history, George Jones and Patsy Cline ruled country radio and if you were dancing, you were probably doing the Twist to songs by Sam Cooke or Isley Brothers.

Outside the world of music it was the year of the Cuban Missile Crisis, Jackie Robinson became the first Black American elected to The Baseball Hall of Fame, the first James Bond film, Dr. No, hit the big screen and The Beverly Hillbillies hit the TV and quickly became the most popular show of the year.

The Splendid Table

Encore episode – June 4: Madhur Jaffrey

  • We’re spending the hour with the legendary award-winning food writer and actress Madhur Jaffrey. Madhur has been writing about Indian food and cooking for over 40 years and is considered one of the world’s foremost authorities.

Marketplace Tech Summer Schedule

Beginning in June, Marketplace Tech will have a rotating schedule of hosts during the summer months. Molly Wood will still be reporting and doing some hosting, so you and your listeners will continue to hear her voice on the program. In order for Molly to focus on a special project, other familiar Marketplace voices will be given the chance to host this summer and showcase their talent. Should you have any questions, please reach out to your station relations representative.

What’s coming up from APM May 24-30

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace PM

Week of May 24

  • Kai tours a centralized ghost kitchen in Pasadena, CA operated by Kitchen United.
  • Kai talks with Ellen Weinreb of the Weinreb Group about how the role of Chief Sustainability Officers is changing.

Marketplace Tech

  • May 24: Last year, tech companies made big promises about improving their culture. Microsoft, for example, said it would spend $150M on diversity efforts and would double the number of Black leaders by 2025; Google said it would increase Black leaders by 30% by 2025. What concrete steps to improve company culture are recommended, and did the big tech companies take them?
  • May 25: Act One Ventures partner Alejandro Guerrero spearheaded an effort last year for venture capitalists to commit to including diversity riders in their boilerplate contracts. Since then, 50 firms are using the rider, up from 10, and it’s been used in hundreds of deals.

On Point

  • Boston Globe senior opinion writer Kimberly Atkins hosts On Point May 24-26, and WBUR senior political reporter Anthony Brooks hosts May 27-28.
  • May 24: As we mark one year since the murder of George Floyd, historian Elizabeth Hinton joins The Boston Globe’s Kimberly Atkins to talk about her call for a sweeping reconsideration of how we think about racial unrest in America. Hinton is the author of a new book America on Fire: The Untold History of Police Violence and Black Rebellion Since the 1960s.
  • May 27: U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona speaks with WBUR’s Anthony Brooks about America’s school reopening challenges. What will ‘back to school’ look like across the U.S.?

Classical

Performance Today

May 26: Valerie Kahler (in for Fred Child) will read listeners’ dedications to 2021 graduates throughout the Performance Today broadcast.


Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes listeners back to the sounds and events of a specific year.

May 28 – 1995:

Foo Fighters dropped their debut (though it was more of a Dave Grohl solo album), there were firsts from D’Angelo & the band Garbage., and Oasis and Alanis Morrissette were 2 of the year’s phenoms. Bjork revived a song from 1951 for her biggest hit yet, the alt-country movement was thriving with debuts from both Wilco and Son Volt and Tracy Chapman had a bluesy hit.

Outside the world of music, Cal Ripken Jr. breaks Lou Gehrig’s consecutive games played record, the Houston Rockets featuring Clyde Drexler & Hakeem Olajuwon swept Orlando for the NBA title, it was the Dallas Cowboys over the Pittsburgh Steelers to win Super Bowl #30, and the “Trial of the Century” involving O.J. Simpson begins. ER was the top show on TV, and Batman Forever starring Val Kilmer was the top film.

The Splendid Table

Encore episode – May 28: Kitchen tools

  • Tim Hayward tells us about the tools that have surprisingly changed our lives. His book is The Modern Kitchen.
  • Quintin Middleton of Middleton Made Knives shares how he designs a great chef’s knife.
  • We talk to Ruth Ades-Laurent about her father, the legendary Joseph Ades, also known as the “Gentleman Peeler” who made millions selling vegetable peelers on the streets of New York City
  • America’s Test Kitchen brings us the best of their reader’s kitchen tool hacks.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

What’s coming up from APM May 17-23

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Week of May 17

Marketplace PM

  • Kai talks with Daniel Kahneman about his new book Noise: A flaw in human judgement.
  • When we talk about economic data on the show, we often use the term “household,” which is defined by the federal government as one or more people who occupy a housing unit. But the way that data is collected – the questions asked, the responses allowed – has changed over time. For instance, in the 1970 Census, only a man could be designated the “Head of the Household.” Until 2020, the Census did not include categories for same-sex couples living in the same home. Marketplace’s Marielle Segarra unpacks the term “household” – where it comes from, how the definition has changed, who it still excludes, and why that matters.

Marketplace Tech

  • Amy Scott hosts the program May 17-18.
  • May 17: Tech companies are increasingly working on “vocal profiling,” the idea that someone’s voice reveals information about their emotions, personality, weight, race, illness and more. Guest: Joseph Turow, author of The Voice Catchers: How Marketers Listen In to Exploit Your Feelings, Your Privacy, and Your Wallet.

On Point

  • May 17: Republican Representative Liz Cheney has described former President Donald Trump and his loyalists as being “at war with the constitution.” Renowned constitutional law scholar Akhil Reed Amar speaks with host Meghna Chakrabarti about the enduring power of the constitution. He says it’s more than a document, it’s a ‘conversation.’ Akhil Reed Amar is the author of The Words That Made Us: America’s Constitutional Conversation, 1760-1840.
  • May 18: The cyber-attack on Colonial Pipeline has exposed, once again, how vulnerable our key infrastructure is to cyber-attack. It has also revealed fundamental flaws in the public-private partnerships we rely on for much of this country’s infrastructure. We assess President Biden’s executive order aimed at strengthening the United States’ defenses by encouraging private companies to practice better cybersecurity, or risk being locked out of federal contracts.
  • May 19: ‘Help Wanted’ signs in restaurant windows seem commonplace these days. Some restaurant owners blame their worker shortage on high unemployment benefit payments that they say make not working more attractive than working. But some former restaurant workers say they don’t want to go back to jobs that are poorly paid and with brutal hours and working conditions. Is this a moment of reckoning for the restaurant industry?

Classical

Performance Today

  • May 20: Performance Today will feature the first ever tubist as a Young Artist in Residence! Cristina Cutts-Dougherty studies tuba at the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia.
  • A year ago, when millions of graduates didn’t have in-person ceremonies, Performance Today created an hour of programming to honor graduates’ accomplishments. The program was popular, so the feature is returning for 2021. Starting May 19, Fred Child will ask listeners for a short message honoring a 2021 graduate in their life, and Fred will read them on the show May 26.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes listeners back to the sounds and events of a specific year.

May 21 – 1970:

The Beatles made it official and broke up, but left us a nice parting gift, a final album and lots of solo material. We lost guitar legend Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin 2 weeks apart, both at age 27. Santana was becoming a certified guitar hero after the release of Abraxas, Van Morrison released his most beloved album, Edwin Starr dropped one of the first protest songs on the Motown label, and Joni Mitchell was busy writing an environmental anthem and a song for Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young.

Outside the work of music, the New York Knicks won the NBA championship, the Baltimore Orioles won the World Series, and the Colts won the Super Bowl in the year that Monday Night Football debuted. Marcus Welby MD was the most popular show on the TV, The Flip Wilson show was #2, and the first Earth Day was celebrated.

The Splendid Table

Encore episode – May 21: Persian food

  • Samin Nosrat, author of Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat, tells us why Persian cooks are so obsessed with fresh herbs.
  • Naz Deravian, author of Bottom of the Pot, has a tale of tahdig and home
  • Najmieh Batmanglij, author of Cooking in Iran, has a report on what people are cooking in modern-day Iran.
  • Chef/founder of Moosh NYC, Behzad Jamshidi, teaches Francis a classic recipe for Ghaliyeh Mahi, a fish stew with fenugreek.

A word from Jonathan Dyer, EP of On Point

Hello there,

Jonathan Dyer here, On Point’s new Executive Producer, with a few words about why I am delighted to be with this show — and some insights about what we’re working on at the new On Point.

I have spent what seems like a lifetime making newsmagazine shows. And given that I started my broadcast journalism career producing the BBC World Service’s Newshour, at a time when editing meant razor blade and reel-to-reel tape, it might actually be a lifetime. My most satisfying days at the helm of a show have always been when a story warranted taking up most, if not all, of that day’s output. We could explore every angle and bring in every voice, from the academic with deep knowledge and insight to the person on the ground with lived experience, and spend time to dive deeper to explore a story through the prism of history or culture and peel away the layers to reveal the essential truth at the heart of it.

So, I am truly excited to be leading the talented team behind the new On Point. I get to do that deep dive thing every day. We get to explore a story with so much more nuance than you would in a traditional magazine show. And we’re investing more time, enterprise reporting and storytelling craft into each minute.

Case in point: our April 16 edition looking at the trial of former Minneapolis police officer, Derek Chauvin, from the perspective of 30 years ago when four Los Angeles police officers went on trial for beating Rodney King. Hearing the recollection of Rodney King’s daughter, and John Burris, the civil rights attorney who represented Rodney King in his civil lawsuit against the LAPD in 1994, speak about what has and hasn’t changed in America between then and now was nothing short of compelling.

We were thrilled to learn last week that the RTNDA has recognized On Point with a regional Murrow Award for best News Documentary for What The President Knew, through our home station WBUR. And while we are not a documentary program, we are able to bring the kind of depth and original perspective that can win us an award for news documentary. I think that’s something a daily show can brag about.

I’m also really proud of our new series, Amazon: The Prime Effect, exploring the myriad ways Amazon is shaping how we live and work today. This series came directly from Host Meghna Chakrabarti — she is smart, conversational, eager to connect with real people to get their take and experts who can answer her probing questions. I think it’s a great showcase for the kind of revealing, impactful, smartly produced journalism that is On Point’s signature. Look out for that as it rolls out through the summer.

If you have feedback or questions about the show, please reach out to your station relations representative – they’re always interested to hear from you! Keep an eye out for future communications from the On Point team – you’ll be hearing from us every few months. And thanks.

Jonathan Dyer
Executive Producer, On Point