On Point is looking for your feedback

Please provide input by October 31

On Point has spent the last several months covering Amazon – and how it shapes the global economy and how we live and work today – in their broadcast series, “The Prime Effect.” From this reporting, which ran as episodes of On Point, they also produced a three-part series of hour-long specials for you to air in July, August and September.

The On Point team is seeking station feedback on this recent series, as well as any overall feedback on the show. Thank you in advance for taking this brief 5-minute survey to provide your input. We will share your feedback with On Point for their consideration. Please provide your input by October 31.

TAKE THE SURVEY

Your week at a glance: October 18-24

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace PM

Week of October 18

  • We continue with our new series Temporarily Unavailable – how stuff moves around the world…or doesn’t. Our next stop is a container depot in Wilmington, California, where Kai shops around for a shipping container.

Marketplace Tech

  • Throughout the summer and into fall, Marketplace Tech will have a rotating schedule of hosts. Marielle Segarra hosts October 18.
  • Kimberly Adams will be hosting from October 19-22

On Point

  • October 18: The World Health Organization has approved the first vaccine for malaria, in fact the first vaccine for a parasitic disease. It could save tens of thousands of children’s lives each year. On Point explores what it’s been like to live with pervasive Malaria in sub-Saharan Africa and how a vaccine could transform lives. Plus, the crucial role played by a tree species only found in Chile.
  • October 22: Elissa Epel is a health psychologist and a professor in the Department of Psychiatry at UC San Francisco. After observing her own son and the impact that the pandemic has been having on other children, she joins host Meghna Chakrabarti to talk about how parents need to be alert to the possibility that we are raising a generation of pessimists. But it’s not too late to be hopeful. 

Classical

Performance Today

  • Between now and October 27, Performance Today audiences will hear new Piano Puzzlers every Wednesday.
  • October 18: Performance Today will include highlights from the 2021 Canadian Festival de Lanaudiere, featuring violinist Andrew Wan and pianist Charles Richard-Hamelin.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current


October 22 – 1992

  • Annie Lennox of Eurythmics fame released her solo debut, and she didn’t miss a beat. Natalie Merchant was soon to make a solo album after making her final album with 10,000 Maniacs, The Lemonheads released their biggest album, thanks in part to a Simon & Garfunkel cover, and R.E.M continued their early 90’s roll releasing the stellar Automatic for the People. The East LA band Los Lobos released the most adventurous album of their long career, Arizona rockers Gin Blossoms had one of the year’s surprise hits with their New Miserable Experience album, Arrested Development released one of the best hip-hop records of 1992 and the notoriously gloomy band, The Cure, showed a sunnier demeanor on their Wish album.
  • Outside the world of music, Larry Bird retires from the Celtics, while Jordan and the Chicago Bulls win another title. Compact discs surpass cassette tapes as the preferred medium for recorded music. After 30 years, Johnny Carson hosted The Tonight Show for the last time. And Bill Clinton was elected President of the United States, defeating incumbent President George H. W. Bush.

The Splendid Table


Encore episode – October 22:

  • Dorie Greenspan is in the house answering your questions. Her latest book is Baking With Dorie.
  • Then we spend time with Abra Berens: chef , former farmer and award winning author. Her new book is Grist: A Practical Guide to Cooking Grains, Seeds, Beans and Legumes

Timely Selections

Digital / Marketing tool from the BBC World Service

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these shareable videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and follow the link below to explore the library of videos!

VIEW VIDEOS HERE


Questions? Reach out to your Station Relations Representative.

Uprooted: The 1950s plan to erase Indian Country

Broadcast Window: October 7, 2021 – November 30, 2021

Length: One hour

This documentary presents the voices of people who survived a devastating plan to solve “the Indian problem.” In the 1950s, the U.S. government launched a campaign to assimilate Native Americans by eliminating reservations, terminating tribal governments, and persuading Native people to move to cities. The relocation program has received little coverage in the media, despite its enormous influence on the course of Native people’s lives. This documentary provides listeners a unique opportunity to hear the voices of Native people who lived through this era, and people still struggling to overcome its effects.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative

BBC Monthly: November Docs, Specials and Video Selections

Coming in November 2021

Featuring voices from across the U.S. and around the globe, connect your audience to the world with these unique stories and perspectives. This month, we discuss the ways medical teams look after the emotional well-being of COVID patients, feature questions from around the world about the outcome of the UN climate summit, and explore the roots of Country and Americana music. See below for details.

Visit our website to learn more, and find links to ContentDepot for programs, promos and billboards.

As a BBC affiliate, you have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Visit the BBC Media Partner Centre to take advantage of this opportunity and increase your social media presence with consistent, shareable videos centering topics aligned with your audience’s interests.

See below for a curated selection of high performing videos.


Docs and Specials

On the Covid Ward

One hour
November 13 – 19

How medical teams look after the emotional well-being of COVID patients and families; including efforts to keep up the will to live, and enable families to stay connected with these patients.

World Questions: What the World Makes of Cop26

One hour
November 16 – December 13

From Glasgow, a global panel and questions from around the world on the outcome of the UN climate summit, COP26.

Black Tomatoes

One hour
November 27 – December 3

Black, female and shaking up Country music Americana-folk singer Lady Nade explores the roots of Country and Americana and its debt to black music. And she reflects on her own place in a genre that is only now starting to confront its history.


Monthly BBC Video Selections:

View the instructional guide and social media best practices resource available on our website. Please share all BBC videos within two weeks of downloading them on the BBC Media Partner Centre. Click the links and images below to watch and download these videos.

Covid and mental health – Tips from around the world

  • Description: The spread of coronavirus around the world and the lockdowns and restrictions that came with it, has put an emphasis on how important our physical health is. But what about our mental health?

    With the pandemic now at different stages around the globe – it means people have new and varying worries to deal with. So, we’ve put together some tips from experts from Asia, Africa and the US to help keep your mind a healthy place to be.
  • Suggested social copy: Tips from experts around the globe on how to deal with different mental health challenges we all may experience at different stages in the pandemic.
  • Duration: 2 minutes 27 seconds

Arab Spring, 10 years on – Egyptian street artist Ganzeer

  • Description: When the protestors took to the streets of Cairo in 2011, political murals and graffiti soon followed, providing a visual commentary of the Egyptian Revolution. One of the most prominent street artists was Ganzeer, whose murals became emblematic of the protests.
  • Suggested social copy: Ganzeer’s political murals helped communicate the frustrations around the Arab Spring.
  • Duration: 5 minutes 25 seconds

Could lab-grown meat help tackle climate change?

  • Description: Last year, Singapore became the first country to allow the sale of lab-grown meat. BBC Minute takes a look at what lab-grown meat is and whether it could help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the future.
  • Suggested social copy: BBC Minute takes a look at what lab-grown meat is and whether it could help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the future.
  • Duration: 4 minutes 14 seconds

Your week at a glance: October 11-15

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more


News 

Marketplace 

Week of October 11 

Marketplace (PM) 

  • Kai kicks off a new ongoing series “Temporarily Unavailable” about the people and systems that make global commerce possible.  We’ve all heard of port congestion and supply chain disruptions – companies having a difficult time getting things they need for their products and consumers having to wait longer for items. Our first stop is the port complex in Los Angeles, where Kai visits ship traffic control. 
  • Kai talks with Robin Wigglesworth about his new book Trillions: How a band of wall street renegades invented the index fund and changed finance forever. 

Marketplace Tech 

  • Throughout the summer and into fall, Marketplace Tech will have a rotating schedule of hosts. Marielle Segarra hosts October 11-15. 
  • Week of October 11: Marielle Segarra takes a look at the tech that might make the holidays happen more smoothly, despite supply chain tangles, computer chip shortages and other lingering pandemic challenges. 

On Point 

  • October 11: New Zealand has abandoned its goal of eliminating the coronavirus and getting to zero Covid cases. What does New Zealand’s changing strategy tell us about what the pandemic’s end should look like here? 
  • October 12: Yale Professor Laurie Santos joins Meghna Chakrabarti for a conversation about happiness. Her “Psychology and the Good Life” class, which explores the science behind decision-making and what comprises a fulfilling life, is Yale’s most popular course in over 300 years. 

Classical 

Performance Today 

  • Between now and October 27, Performance Today audiences will hear new Piano Puzzlers every Wednesday. 
  • Week of October 11: Audiences will hear a new piece about one of the first female pirates in history by composer Jessica Meyer entitled She Sailed the Savage Seas
  • October 11: Performance Today will mark Indigenous People’s Day. 

Arts and Culture 

 Time Machine from The Current 

October 15 – 1980 

  • The year John Lennon was gunned down in New York – he had just released his Double Fantasy album. George Jones dropped what many called the greatest country song of all time, Bruce Springsteen and the E-Street band released his only two-album set The River, which became his first album to hit number one, and The Clash upped the ante unleashing the three-album set Sandinista! Exciting new things were happening in the UK with albums from The Jam, The Pretenders and Elvis Costello & the Attractions, while in the States there were big albums from Devo, Talking Heads and Joan Jett & The Blackhearts. Stevie Wonder rolled into the 80’s with the reggae influenced Hotter Than July album, and Bob Marley – who was still with us – left a parting gift called Uprising. 
  • Outside the world of music, 350 million people around the world tuned in to find out who shot JR on the primetime drama “Dallas.” 

The Splendid Table 

As The Splendid Table continues to take listener home cooking questions, please follow the program’s updates on Twitter and encourage listeners to send in their questions as voice memos to contact@splendidtable.org, or via phone at 800-537-5252.  

Encore episode – October 15: Chinese food in America 

  • Chef Lucas Sin of Junzi Kitchen joins us for the conversation and sticks around to help Francis take on your Chinese cooking questions.  
  • We head to Kansas City to hear the story of a legendary Chinese food family empire, the Ng’s. 

Turkey Confidential Updates for 2021

Turkey Confidential is The Splendid Table’s annual Thanksgiving show. Francis Lam takes pre-recorded calls and comes to the rescue of Thanksgiving cooks, kitchen helpers, and dinner guests during the biggest cooking day of the year.

As in 2020, the program for 2021 will be file based – the show will be fed “live” at noon ET, though files will be available 1-2 days prior to Thanksgiving Day if stations prefer to air earlier in the morning on November 25.

This annual Thanksgiving Day broadcast will include the following guests:

  • David Chang and Priya Krishna, authors of the new book Cook at Home: Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying About Recipes (And Love My Microwave),
  • Pati Jinich of PBS’s award -winning series Pati’s Mexican Table
  • Kenji Lopez Alt of Serious Eats and his latest book The Wok Recipes and Techniques
  • Baker Cheryl Day author of Cheryl Day’s Treasury of Southern Baking

Send in your question as a voice memo to The Splendid Table team via email at contact@splendidtable.org or leave a voice message at 800-537-5252.

  • Two :30 promos are available to help promote the opportunity to your audiences. One highlights guests while the other prompts listeners to submit their questions to the show.
  • Subscribe to the Turkey Confidential ContentDepot page to air the program and receive updates.
  • Use this digital asset to promote Turkey Confidential online.

Your week at a glance: October 4-8

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace PM

Week of October 4

  • Kai talks to San Franciso Federal Reserve President Mary Daly.
  • With headlines about how little of the federal rent relief money has reached renters and landlords, let’s look at an exception. In Philadelphia, about three-quarters of the money has been spent, and attorney Vikram Patel chalks it up to the city’s Eviction Diversion program. Since April, a landlord who wants to file an eviction for nonpayment of rent is required to first go through mediation with the tenant. About 2,000 cases have gone through the program so far, with 80% of them getting resolved without an eviction. Marketplace’s Amy Scott profiles a tenant and landlord going through the process.

Marketplace Tech

  • Throughout the summer, Marketplace Tech will have a rotating schedule of hosts. Marielle Segarra hosts October 4-8.

On Point

  • October 4: From cars, to smartphones, to appliances, an international chip shortage is squeezing supply chains and inventory. It’s been this way since the outbreak of the COVID pandemic, but why is it still persisting? It turns out that the pandemic is not the only cause.
  • October 8: Harvard Law professor Randall Kennedy joins Meghna to talk about his more than two decades of his writings as a Black man and conservative legal scholar. He provides unexpected takes on the George Floyd moment, Racial Solidarity, Clarence Thomas, Antiracism, and more. His new book is titled Say It Loud!

The Daily

Upcoming guest hosts

  • October 4-8: The Daily will be hosted by either Sabrina Tavernise or Astead Herndon. Stations should check daily rundowns for host confirmation.

Classical

Performance Today

  • Between now and October 27, Performance Today audiences will hear new Piano Puzzlers every Wednesday.
  • October 8: NYC’s Town Hall and the Naumburg Foundation Celebrate 50 Years of Chamber Music on October 8, and PT will be there: the Emerson String Quartet will perform in some of their final concerts before their retirement.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current


October 8 – 2000

  • U2 entered the new millennium with a return to the old U2 sound. Johnny Cash was still with us and released American 3 which featured a U2 cover. Coldplay dropped their debut album, which was all over the radio, electronic music was gaining steam as Madonna recorded another savvy electronic dance album, and Radiohead ditched their guitars in favor of a more electronic sound. Guitars proved they weren’t dead yet with albums from The Vives and The Dandy Warhols, who both owed a bit to Mick Jagger & the Stones, and the film and soundtrack to O, Brother Where Art Thou breathed new life into older American sounds.
  • Outside the world of music, Y2K went off without a hitch. Shaq, Kobe and the Lakers win their first NBA title in 12 years. It was the Subway series in New York with the Yankee’s defeating the Mets in 6. And the U.S. presidential election was the closest in decades – George W. Bush ultimately defeats Al Gore.

The Splendid Table


NEW episode – October 8: New Fall cookbook releases

  • Kristina Cho, author of Mooncakes and Milkbread, Sweet & Savory Recipes Inspired by Chinese Bakeries.
  • Dylan Thuras, coauthor of Gastro Obscura, A Food Adventurers Guide.

Timely Selections

Digital / Marketing tool from the BBC World Service

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these shareable videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and follow the link below to download today!

‘I thought I was too old to be on TikTok’

  • Description: Spencer West has garnered legions of fans sharing his perspective as a disability advocate. His TikTok videos have received more than 53 million likes.
  • Suggested social copy: How this disability advocate went viral
  • Duration: 2 minutes 46 seconds

Uprooted: The 1950s plan to erase Indian Country

Broadcast Window: October 7, 2021 – November 30, 2021

Length: One hour

This documentary presents the voices of people who survived a devastating plan to solve “the Indian problem.” In the 1950s, the U.S. government launched a campaign to assimilate Native Americans by eliminating reservations, terminating tribal governments, and persuading Native people to move to cities. The relocation program has received little coverage in the media, despite its enormous influence on the course of Native people’s lives. This documentary provides listeners a unique opportunity to hear the voices of Native people who lived through this era, and people still struggling to overcome its effects. Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Your week at a glance: September 27 – October 1

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace PM

Week of September 27

  • Kai talks with former Pepsico CEO Indra Nooyi about her new memoir “My Life in Full: Work, Family, and our Future”
  • From first year investment bankers at Goldman Sachs to cashiers at Chipotle, new employees are receiving higher wages and hiring bonuses to join companies. That’s leaving some longtime employees feeling envious of their new colleagues and forcing employers to offer retention bonuses and raises to longer-tenured workers. Marketplace’s Matt Levin looks at how the bump in entry-level pay is roiling company cultures, and how workers feel about it.

Marketplace Tech

  • Throughout the summer, Marketplace Tech will have a rotating schedule of hosts. Marielle Segarra hosts September 27-October 1.

On Point

  • September 27: Colleges and universities have lost 1.5 million students over the past 5 years, and men make up 71% of that decline. That may be a lagging indicator of a growing economic and social crisis among American men. We’ll hear from researchers who say American democracy depends on doing something about it.

The Daily

  • September 27-28: Michael Barbaro hosts The Daily.
  • September 29-October 1: The Daily will be hosted by either Kevin Roose or Astead Herndon. Stations should check daily rundowns for host confirmation.

News

Marketplace

Marketplace PM

Week of September 27

  • Kai talks with former Pepsico CEO Indra Nooyi about her new memoir “My Life in Full: Work, Family, and our Future”
  • From first year investment bankers at Goldman Sachs to cashiers at Chipotle, new employees are receiving higher wages and hiring bonuses to join companies. That’s leaving some longtime employees feeling envious of their new colleagues and forcing employers to offer retention bonuses and raises to longer-tenured workers. Marketplace’s Matt Levin looks at how the bump in entry-level pay is roiling company cultures, and how workers feel about it.

Marketplace Tech

  • Throughout the summer, Marketplace Tech will have a rotating schedule of hosts. Marielle Segarra hosts September 27-October 1.

On Point

  • September 27: Colleges and universities have lost 1.5 million students over the past 5 years, and men make up 71% of that decline. That may be a lagging indicator of a growing economic and social crisis among American men. We’ll hear from researchers who say American democracy depends on doing something about it.

The Daily

  • September 27-28: Michael Barbaro hosts The Daily.
  • September 29-October 1: The Daily will be hosted by either Kevin Roose or Astead Herndon. Stations should check daily rundowns for host confirmation.

Classical

Performance Today

  • Between now and October 27, Performance Today audiences will hear new Piano Puzzlers every Wednesday.

SymphonyCast


Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current


October 1 – 1971:

  • A year of classic rock albums from across the pond like The Who’s Who’s Next, Led Zeppelin 4 and The Rolling Stones Sticky Fingers. There were funk & soul classics from Marvin Gaye, who issued his masterpiece “What’s Going On”, the same years as There’s a Riot Going On from Sly and the Family Stone, while Funkadelic dropped Maggot Brain. There were folk classics too from Joni Mithcell and Carole King, and former Chicago postman John Prine issued his fabulous debut.
  • Outside the world of music, The Apollo 14 lands on the moon, Gene Hackman starred in The French Connection, which became the most decorated film of the year, and it was Joe Frazier over Muhammed Ali to claim the heavyweight title.

The Splendid Table


Encore episode – October 1: Dads and kids

  • Kenji López-Alt of Serious Eats joins to talk about his latest project, Every Night is Pizza Night. He’ll also be taking your calls with Francis about cooking with and feeding kids.
  • The dynamic duo, David Chang and Chris Ying join us to talk about their podcast show, DADS, devoted to dads and their offspring. David Chang’s new book is Eat a Peach, A Memoir. Chris Ying’s latest with Ivan Orkin is Gaijin Cookbook: Japanese Recipes From a Chef, Father, Eater and Lifelong Outsider.

The Splendid Table


Encore episode – October 1: Dads and kids

  • Kenji López-Alt of Serious Eats joins to talk about his latest project, Every Night is Pizza Night. He’ll also be taking your calls with Francis about cooking with and feeding kids.
  • The dynamic duo, David Chang and Chris Ying join us to talk about their podcast show, DADS, devoted to dads and their offspring. David Chang’s new book is Eat a Peach, A Memoir. Chris Ying’s latest with Ivan Orkin is Gaijin Cookbook: Japanese Recipes From a Chef, Father, Eater and Lifelong Outsider.

Timely Selections

Digital / Marketing tool from the BBC World Service

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these shareable videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and follow the link below to download today!

‘I feared I would drown in my bedroom’ – experts warn climate change making mental health worse

  • Description: Experts warn that more people could experience mental health problems due to climate change.

    Research shows that the conditions for extreme weather events like floods and typhoons are made more likely by climate change and may contribute to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and depression.

    Helen Berry, Honorary Professor of climate change and mental health, says it’s “impossible to overstate the impact of climate change unchecked will have on our mental health”.

    Mitzi Jonelle Tan, who lives in the Philippines, has experienced numerous typhoons. She told BBC Minute’s Olivia Le Poidevin how, what she describes as ‘climate trauma’ has caused her to have panic attacks and anxiety.
  • Suggested social copy: Experts warn that more people could experience mental health problems due to climate change.
  • Duration: 4 minutes 45 seconds

Unexplainable from Vox

Broadcast Window: October 1, 2021 – January 7, 2022

Length: One hour

In an hour-long special, Vox’s Unexplainable will explore some of the most exciting unanswered questions in physics. Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Your week at a glance: September 20-26

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Week of September 20

  • Kai talks with Lindsay McCormick, CEO of Bite Toothpaste Bits, about the challenge of launching a new product with global supply chains in turmoil.
  • In summer 2020, Marketplace’s Marielle Segarra visited the Midtown East neighborhood of Manhattan to see how lunch spots were faring through shutdowns. She returns this week to that neighborhood to see how things are going now, in this new phase of the pandemic.

Marketplace Tech

  • Marketplace Tech continues to have a rotating schedule of hosts. Marielle Segarra hosts September 20-24.

On Point

  • September 20: The United States defense budget is more than $700 billion dollars. To put that in context, the US spends more on national defense than China, India, Russia, the UK, Saudi Arabia, Germany, France, Japan, South Korea, Italy, and Australia, combined. At a time when big questions are being asked about President Biden’s infrastructure spending proposals we look into the US defense budget and ask why it’s so hard to figure out how that money is being spent.
  • September 21: Boston Globe Senior Columnist Kimberly Atkins Stohr hosts the program, and speaks with former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb about the state of the COVID-19 pandemic, mistakes made in how we have dealt with it and lessons learned. His forthcoming book is titled Uncontrolled Spread: Why COVID-19 Crushed Us and How We Can Defeat the Next Pandemic.
  • September 22 (rescheduled): The concluding episode of On Point’s Series ‘The Prime Effect.’ Having explored the myriad ways that Amazon has been changing the way we live, shop, and work, we explore how it is looking to do that in new ways going forward.

Classical

Performance Today

  • Between now and October 27, Performance Today audiences will hear new Piano Puzzlers every Wednesday.

SymphonyCast


Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

September 24 – 1960:

  • The year Elvis Presley is discharged from the service, and the 1st song he records is “Are You Lonesome Tonight.” Roy Orbison had his first major hit, Etta James recorded a song for the ages, 15 year old Brenda Lee hit #1 on the pop chart and Ray Charles released “Georgia on My Mind,” which would go on the be the official state song of Georgia. The Ventures kickstarted the surf-rock craze, the girl group The Shirelles had one of the biggest hits of the year, Fats Domino released a New Orleans classic, and Willie Nelson wrote “Night Life”…and quickly sold it for $150.
  • Outside the world of music, John F Kennedy became president. Alfred Hitchcock’s film Psycho was one of the year’s most talked about films, and Westerns were all over TV.

The Splendid Table

NEW episode – September 24: Pizza

  • We’re going deep into pizza this week with the charming Nathan Myhrvold, founder of Modern Cuisine and co-author of the ground-breaking Modernist Pizza.
  • We’re answering listener questions, talking about real-life pizza-making strategies, and looking at pizza traditions all over the globe.

Timely Selections

Digital / Marketing tool from the BBC World Service

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these shareable videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and follow the link below to download today!

Sharia judge: The Taliban wanted me dead (Expires September 1, 2022)

  • Description: Marzia Babakarkhail knows what it’s like to have the Taliban break her door down intent on killing her. In 1997, they did just that because of her work promoting education and progress for women. She was forced to flee and now lives in the UK where she continues her work which she says has never been more important.
  • Suggested social copy: Marzia Babakarkhail knows what it’s like to have the Taliban break her door down intent on killing her.
  • Duration: 3 minutes 41 seconds

Sharia judge: The Taliban wanted me dead

APM Presents: Q2 Specials

For years, APM affiliate stations have been accessing special programming through APM Celebrates to help their audiences commemorate holidays, offer seasonal cooking tips, and provide kid-friendly programming for families.

More recently, APM specials have evolved to address timely topics that audiences care about, like climate change, structural inequity, mental health, and more. In recognition of the expanded reach of our programming, we are excited to rename our quarterly specials package to: APM Presents. Find the full announcement here and see our website for Q2 specials. 

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

A word from “The Daily”

Dear Colleagues,

We hope you’ve all been enjoying what seems like the fastest summer ever. As we cope with the sudden return of fall, we’d like to give you a rundown of what we’ve been up to these past few weeks.

A New Leader for the Audio Team at The Times

In July, we shared the exciting news that Paula Szuchman, our former head of Opinion Audio, will become The Times’s new director of Audio. As director of Audio, Paula will manage the teams that make our shows to ensure that our journalism remains excellent, even as we scale to do more, and that we live up to our values in fostering an equitable and inclusive culture.

A little bit about Paula and why she’s the perfect person for this role: Paula is a creative and exacting editor who makes every story she works on better. She is a compassionate manager who understands the demands of audio production as well as print — she spent three years as a Page One editor at The Wall Street Journal. She has a proven track record in managing journalists across mediums — she ran production teams for five years at WNYC, working across a range of subjects from personal narratives to news. After eight years at The Wall Street Journal, she ran the newsroom at The Daily Beast and worked as an editor at Newsweek.

We could not be more excited about what this means for the future of The Daily and NYT Audio.

How ‘The Daily’ Covered Afghanistan’s Fall

Some episodes of The Daily come together over weeks. In the case of the episode that aired on Monday, August 16, it took a weekend. Responding to the rapid fall of Afghanistan’s government to the Taliban, the episode featured the visceral reactions of one resident of Kabul as she was witnessing the collapse of the country around her, day by day. (She was referred to only as the initial R., because she feared retaliation by the Taliban.) To shed light on the making of this episode — and the many choices and areas of expertise that combine to shape one show — three staff members talked about their roles: Lynsea Garrison, one of the producers; Larissa Anderson, an editor; and Chris Wood, a sound engineer who works in London.

You can read more about how they made this powerful episode of The Daily here.

Meeting The Guest Host: Sabrina Tavernise

Over the last several weeks, listeners were introduced to Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The Times — and a fantastic guest host of The Daily.

Recent episodes hosted by Sabrina delved into a breadth of stories, including a conversation with Natalie Kitroeff about Mexico and the problem of America’s lax approach to guns; a chat with Carlotta Gall about the Taliban’s strategy as the United States started to withdraw from Afghanistan; and an in-depth look at the story of Simone Biles, the greatest gymnast of all time, with Juliet Macur.

Sabrina started at The Times in Moscow in 2000 and spent her first 10 years as a foreign correspondent, based in Russia, Iraq and Pakistan, and in Turkey, where she was the Istanbul bureau chief. In Iraq, she covered civilian casualties and documented the lives of ordinary Iraqis from 2003 to 2007 and was one of the first to identify sectarian cleansing in 2005.

Here’s a little bit about Sabrina’s thoughts on hosting from a recent conversation with her and Michael:

Michael: I feel your bio perfectly set you up for this moment when we asked you to help host the show, because you’ve covered such big and rich and varied subjects around the globe. What’s the transition been like from reporter/Daily guest to having hosting responsibilities?

Sabrina: Hard! I love audio. Definitely my favorite medium. But I’m not used to actually creating it. So there’s a learning curve. But I love it.

I still feel like that cartoon T-rex trying. Like I have these really powerful legs from running but I’m being told that the one thing I need to do now is pull-ups and so I’m trying to do pull-ups with these little, undeveloped arms. And no one cares how fast I can run.

Michael: I love that metaphor. Hosting is… weird!

Sabrina: Hard! Yeah. It is weird. but great!

Michael Barbaro may be out for a few weeks this fall — look to APM for further details.

Until next time,
-The Daily Team

p.s. Thank you for taking the survey sent by APM about guest hosting and promotions. We will be taking your feedback into consideration as our team and the program continues to evolve.

Your week at a glance: September 13-19

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

BBC World Service

Ros Atkins On…

  • September 18: The program Ros Atkins On… will be returning to the BBC World Service.
  • Broadcast times: Saturdays, 12:50-1 a.m. ET (rpt. 6:50-7 p.m. ET).
  • More info on the Media Partner Centre.

Marketplace

Marketplace PM

Week of September 13

  • Kai talks to Kim Belair, founder of video game development company Sweet Baby, Inc, about labor trends in the game industry.
  • Kai speaks to Dr. David S. Meyer, professor of sociology at University of California, Irvine, about the 10-year anniversary of the Occupy Wall Street movement and its effect on economic policy and inequality.

Marketplace Tech

  • Throughout the summer, Marketplace Tech will have a rotating schedule of hosts. Jed Kim hosts September 13-17.
  • September 14: The buy-now-pay-later field is growing fast—companies that let you pay off purchases big and small in monthly installments, sometimes without interest if you make your payments on time. Affirm, one of the industry’s biggest companies, recently signed a deal with Amazon, to offer financing at checkout. Guest: Max Levchin, CEO, Affirm.

On Point

  • September 13: On Point explores the difference Latino voters could make in California’s gubernatorial recall vote. This is partly a story about how COVID has disproportionately affected Latinos in California, and whether that leads to “apathy or anger,” to quote former LA mayor Antonio Villaraigosa.
  • September 15: The concluding episode in On Point’s series ‘Amazon: The Prime Effect.’ Having explored the myriad ways that Amazon has been changing the way we live, shop, and work, On Point explores how Amazon is looking to do that in new ways going forward.
  • September 16: Meghna Chakrabarti is joined by Robert Hogue, a career civilian in the military. Hogue’s office was above where the airplane struck the Pentagon on 9/11. Hogue has had a 20-year window on the Marines since then, from the war on terror, to Afghanistan and Iraq, to issues about gender and “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”

Classical

Performance Today

  • Between now and October 27, Performance Today audiences will hear new Piano Puzzlers every Wednesday.
  • September 15: Performance Today listeners will hear music by Max Bruch and Ernest Bloch in observance of Yom Kippur.

SymphonyCast


Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current


September 17 – 1993:

  • There was a heaping helping of emerging artists with 1st albums coming from Radiohead, Counting Crows, Liz Phair & Sheryl Crow, who released her big selling Tuesday Night Music Club album. Lenny Kravitz became a certified rockstar, Nirvana released what would be their final studio album, hip-hop pioneers Salt and Pepa released Very Necessary and would later become the first female rap act to win a Grammy, and A Tribe Called Quest dropped their biggest single to date.
  • Outside the world of music, Bill Clinton took office in January, becoming the country’s 42nd president. 80.4 million people tuned in to the series finale of Cheers, and Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls won another championship making it a three-Peat. Teens Britney Spears, Justin Timberlake, and Christina Aguilera joined the cast of The New Mickey Mouse Club.

The Splendid Table


Encore episode – September 17: Baking

  • Former pastry chef Lisa Donovan, author of Our Lady of Perpetual Hunger: A Memoir, joins Francis to answer all your baking questions.
  • Then, we talk to Anissa Helou, author of Sweet Middle East, about the legendary sweets of the region.

Timely Selections

Digital / Marketing tool from the BBC World Service

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these shareable videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and follow the link below to download today!

Covid-19 vaccine hesitancy among young people

  • Description: The World Health Organization says it’s “really concerned” that some young people are doubting whether they would want to get vaccinated against Covid-19. Experts say a vaccine offers the best chance for lockdown and social distancing measures to be relaxed, as it would train people’s immune system to fight the virus so they don’t become sick. But amidst misinformation online, research shows that a number of young people may choose not to get the jab. BBC Minute’s Olivia Le Poidevin reports.
  • Suggested caption: The World Health Organization is concerned some under 35s may not choose to get the coronavirus jab.
  • Duration: 2 minutes 46 seconds

APM Presents: Q2 Specials

For years, APM affiliate stations have been accessing special programming through APM Celebrates to help their audiences commemorate holidays, offer seasonal cooking tips, and provide kid-friendly programming for families.

More recently, APM specials have evolved to address timely topics that audiences care about, like climate change, structural inequity, mental health, and more. In recognition of the expanded reach of our programming, we are excited to rename our quarterly specials package to: APM Presents. Find the full announcement here and see our website for Q2 specials. Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.