What’s coming up from APM April 19-25

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Week of April 19

Marketplace PM

  • Kai talks to Julie Wainwright, CEO of The RealReal about retail and real estate.
  • Kai talks with Chipotle CEO Brian Niccol about how the fast-casual industry is adapting to the post pandemic world.

Marketplace Tech

  • April 19: Two dozen states are considering right to repair bills – laws that would allow consumers to fix the products they buy without charging fees to manufacturers or only using certified technicians. Guest: Kyle Wiens, CEO of iFixit.
  • April 20: The global semiconductor chip shortage shows no signs of abating until at least 2023. How will this change consumer behavior? Maybe we don’t need that internet-connected toothbrush after all.

On Point

The Boston Globe’s Kimberly Atkins hosts April 19-23

  • April 19: Corporate America is taking a stand against voting restrictions. More than 100 CEOs signed a letter published in the New York Times to oppose restrictive election laws proposed in states like Georgia; but other big-name companies did not. On Point assesses the state of corporate activism in the U.S. in 2021.
  • April 20: After the pause in the distribution of the Johnson and Johnson COVID-19 vaccine and polling showing consistent vaccine hesitancy, we explore the consequences of those events and efforts to tackle persistent vaccine myths.
  • April 22: As President Biden calls on world leaders to make climate commitments and re-prioritize action to tackle climate change, we speak with teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg about her list of priorities.

Classical

Performance Today

  • April 21-23: Elena See will host Performance Today.
  • April 22: Listeners will hear music for Earth Day.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes you back to the sounds of a specific year with a carefully curated list of the best songs. Plus, he’ll invite you to reexamine some deeper cuts as we look back on what happened that year in music, pop culture and the world.

April 23 – 2007:

Both MIA & Kanye West had big tunes featuring prominent samples, and Robert Plant and Alison Krauss collaborated on the Raising Sand album. Radiohead turned the music business on its head by using a pay what you want business model on their In Rainbows album, The White Stripes made their final studio album, while Bon Iver released its debut record in the north woods of Wisconsin. Mavis Staples revisited some of the Civil Rights anthems of the 50’s and 60’s, and Arcade Fire released its highly anticipated 2nd album.

Outside the world of music, Al Gore won the Nobel Peace Prize, The New England Patriots ran the table, going undefeated 2007, but lost to the Giants in the Super Bowl in early 08. The San Antonio Spurs swept Lebron and the Cleveland Cavaliers to win the NBA title, Mad Men debuted and popularized cocktail culture and The Simpsons became movie stars.

The Splendid Table

As The Splendid Table continues to take listener home cooking questions, please follow the program’s updates on Twitter and encourage listeners to send in their questions as voice memos to contact@splendidtable.org, or via phone at 800-537-5252.  

NEW episode – April 23:

  • We head into the food of the Eastern Mediterranean with Yasmin Khan, author of Ripe Figs, Recipes and Stories from Turkey, Greece and Cyprus.
  • Then we head to the Arab world with Palestinian writer Reem Kassis and her new book Arabesque, Contemporary Recipes from the Arab World.

Questions? Please Contact your Station Representative

One year later: The loss of George Floyd

In collaboration with The Washington Post and Minnesota Public Radio, American Public Media is offering special programming in recognition of the passage of one year since the killing of George Floyd.

Communities around the world have mourned the loss of George Floyd’s life over the course of the last year. While the nation watches the Chauvin trial unfold, these specials will provide useful analysis and commentary to help contextualize the trial and honor the life and loss of George Floyd.

This special programming examines the role systemic racism played throughout the course of George Floyd’s life and explores how communities are dealing with the aftermath of his death. Please visit our website for more information or contact your Stations Relations Representative.

The Life of George Floyd

Post Reports, The Washington Post

May 18 – June 30, 2021

One Hour

George Floyd has become a symbol, and a rallying cry. But what’s missing in our understanding is the man himself: a figure who was complicated, full of ambition, shaped by his family and his community and a century of forces around him.

In this one-hour special of “Post Reports,” we explore the life and experiences of the man who sparked a movement, as part of The Washington Post’s series “George Floyd’s America.” The reporting explores the institutional and societal roadblocks Floyd encountered as a Black man from his birth in 1973 until his death, and the role systemic racism played throughout his life.

George Floyd during his high school years

How George Floyd Changed Us

MPR News with Angela Davis

May 18 – June 21, 2021

One Hour


This special will also incorporate the more recent killing of Daunte Wright by police in Brooklyn Center, MN, a nearby suburb of Minneapolis, on Sunday, April 11, 2021.

As we mark a year since George Floyd was killed in Minneapolis, join MPR News host Angela Davis for a reflection on how he changed us.

In this one-hour special, you’ll hear a range of voices articulating the transformation that’s taken place on both personal and community levels – from the young people whose worldview has been forever altered to the community members working to ensure the Black man killed when a police officer kneeled on his neck is never forgotten. We’ll also check in with a renowned expert on trauma and healing on what gives him hope a year later.

Questions? Please visit our website or contact your Stations Relations Representative.

What’s coming up from APM April 12-18

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Week of April 12

Marketplace PM

  • Kai checks back in with our economic historian panel – this time, a look at pent up demand following a recession, and the idea of a repeat of the roaring 20s.
  • The QR code isn’t new to Americans. From time to time before Covid, we used our phones to scan those funny looking square things. But the pandemic made it mainstream, as a contactless way to pull up menus and order food. By one measure, half the eateries in the country adopted some form of QR code during the pandemic. Marketplace’s Scott Tong looks at the future of QR codes.

Marketplace Tech

  • Meghan McCarty Carino hosts the program on April 12, with Molly Wood hosting April 13-16.
  • April 12: When we talk about the spread of false information on the internet, the discussion is often focused on what the platforms can do to stop its spread. But there are tools that consumers can use to figure out what is true and what is not. Helen Lee Bouygues [BWEEG] is the founder and President of the Reboot Foundation, an organization aimed at increasing people’s long-term critical thinking skills and media consumption habits.
  • April 16: Facebook and other social media companies are facing criticism for allowing too much disinformation on their platforms about things like elections and COVID-19 vaccines. And not only in English – some critics say the problem is worse in other languages. As Rachael Myrow of KQED reports, according to at least one study by the human rights non-profit Avaaz, just 29 percent of misinformation in Spanish is flagged on Facebook, compared to 70 percent of comparable material in English.

On Point

  • April 12: It’s hard to avoid how polarized and divided our national politics has become….and those divisions are not just confined to politics. Sometimes it seems like it’s an us and them world. We don’t just disagree; we are in what New York Times bestselling author and award-winning journalist Amanda Ripley calls, a state of “high conflict.” Ripley joins us to talk about her research into how good people get captured by high conflict—and how they break free.
  • April 13: The Biden administration sees China as its top geo-political rival, but also a partner when it comes to issues like fighting climate change and dealing with North Korea. A high-level meeting between the US and China broke out into a very undiplomatic war of words last month. What does that indicate about the two super-powers level of mistrust and understanding? On Point dedicates its hour to better understand China’s motives and long-term goals as we ask the question: what does China want?
  • April 14: New surveys indicate Americans’ membership in communities of worship has declined sharply in recent years, with less than 50% of the country belonging to a church, synagogue or mosque. On Point looks into what’s filling the God-gap.

Classical

Performance Today

  • April 15: Performance Today will broadcast the interviews and performances with the second Young Artist in Residence – Randall Goosby, a violinist studying at Juilliard.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes you back to the sounds of a specific year with a carefully curated list of the best songs. Plus, he’ll invite you to reexamine some deeper cuts as we look back on what happened that year in music, pop culture and the world.

April 16 – 1965:  

It was a huge year for Bob Dylan, as he made not one but two classic albums in the same year. Motown was selling records like hotcakes with releases from The Supremes, the Miracles and others, and there were debuts from Sonny and Cher and The Byrds, who liked to record Dylan’s songs. Saxman John Coltrane released what many call one of the greatest albums of all time, the Beatles made their 2nd film, played to 55,000 at Shea Stadium and released the excellent Rubber Soul album, The Stones had a big hit that came to Keith Richards in his sleep, and Roger Miller wrote his biggest hit. Meanwhile, The Sound of Music was the biggest film of the year, and Bonanza was the most popular show on TV.

The Splendid Table

As The Splendid Table continues to take listener home cooking questions, please follow the program’s updates on Twitter and encourage listeners to send in their questions as voice memos to contact@splendidtable.org, or via phone at 800-537-5252.  

Encore episode – April 16:

  • This week we talk about the delicious species of sea urchin that we should be eating more of for the environment with chef/biochemist Ali Bouzari.
  • Rolando Beramendi, author of Autentico, introduces us to the Italian way with rice salads.
  • Best-selling author Alison Roman has some ideas to ramp up savory breakfasts.
  • America’s Test Kitchen brings us the perfect homemade falafel.

Questions? Please Contact your Station Representative.

Access world class videos through the BBC Media Partner Centre

For the past few years, we have worked with stations to pilot BBC video content. These videos were designed to offer a unique way to connect local and global events, and deepen engagement with your audiences by providing consistent, shareable content in your Facebook feeds.

Dozens of stations like yours showcased these engaging videos from the BBC on their Facebook pages. The videos shared across station Facebook pages routinely garnered hundreds of views, with many reaching upwards of 10,000 views. For example, this video garnered over 15,000 views through posts from stations like yours. To build on this success, we are introducing a new opportunity to help you engage audiences and build your digital networks.

The BBC Media Partner Centre now hosts an expanded library of videos, with supported on-boarding training, for you to download and use natively on websites and social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. As a BBC affiliate, you have access to these rights-cleared videos. Topics range from climate change and history to cultural facts and global experiences — since they are not tied to breaking news or broadcast schedules you can use them any time.

Curious about how to access and share these videos?

  • For instructions on how to download and distribute these videos, refer to this helpful instructional guide.

Unsure whether you have the time to dedicate to this new marketing strategy?

Beginning next week, we will be including curated video selections in the BBC Monthly newsletter to provide even more direct access to high-quality videos hand-picked by the BBC. Additionally, these video selections will be included on this consistently updated blog post for your reference.

For more information about using the Media Partner Centre, or creating an individual log-in, visit our website.

As always, if you have any questions about the process feel free to reach out to your Station Relations Representative.

BBC Media Partner Centre: Curated Video Selections

Beginning Tuesday, April 14th, we will update this blog post to include monthly curated video selections.


The BBC Media Partner Centre now hosts an expanded library of archived videos, with supported on-boarding training, for you to download and use natively on websites and social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. As a BBC affiliate, you have access to these rights-cleared videos. Topics range from climate change and history to cultural facts and global experiences — since they are not tied to breaking news or broadcast schedules you can use them any time.

Links to bookmark:

Questions? Please contact your Stations Relations Representative


May BBC Video Selections:

Philippines reef littered with PPE face masks

  • Full description: Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is washing up on coral reefs close to the Philippine capital, Manila. According to an estimate by the Asian Development Bank, during the peak of the Covid-19 outbreak, the city could have been generating up to 280 tonnes of extra medical waste per day. Environmental groups are urging the Philippine government to improve its handling of infectious waste, to prevent further pollution of the seas. The BBC’s Howard Johnson joined divers from Anilao Scuba Dive Centre, a group affiliated to the United Nations Environment Programme’s Green Fins, which promotes sustainable marine tourism in South East Asia.
  • Suggested post: Divers in the Philippines have described finding a coral reef littered with single-use face masks, also known as Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).
  • Duration: 2 minutes 46 seconds

Microplastics, drugs and food – how jellyfish can help us

  • Full description: Scientists are using jellyfish to help solve three problems – removing microplastics from the water, developing new medicines and providing a sustainable source of food.
  • Suggested post: Jellyfish are being used to develop new medicines, filters for microplastics and for food.
  • Duration: 4 minutes 50 seconds


Solar energy empowers young women in Yemen

  • Full description: A group of ten women in Yemen’s Abs district have built and now run a solar microgrid – the first of its kind in the country. The project was set up in 2019 with the help of the UN Development Programme. The women now run the station as their own business – providing affordable, renewable energy to a community living near a war zone.
  • Suggested post: A group of ten women in Yemen’s Abs district have built and now run a solar microgrid.
  • Duration: 2 minutes 17 seconds

May is Mental Health Awareness Month

APM has specials and resources available to help your station commemorate Mental Health Awareness Month throughout May. You can find more information at our website, or contact your Station Relations Representative.

Mental Health in the Media Style Guide by Call to Mind

Call to Mind is American Public Media’s initiative to foster new conversations about mental health. As an initiative of a public media organization, Call to Mind knows intimately that language matters in media coverage as well. As such, the Call to Mind team developed a comprehensive Media Style Guide to address appropriate ways to refer to different conditions and commonly used terms related to mental wellbeing. This guide is intended as a source for journalists and media entities, but is helpful for anyone who wants to understand the implications of their language and how they could do better when it comes to talking about mental health.

Spotlight on Rethinking Mental Health Care

Program 1: April 24, 2021 – May 31, 2021
Program 2: April 25, 2021 – May 31, 2021

Two, one-hour long programs. Each hour can be aired separately or back-to-back

Rethinking Mental Health Care will present an honest critique of the nation’s mental health care shortcomings, while highlighting tangible solutions and models for improving access and quality of care. Hosted by Kimberly Adams of Marketplace, this two-part format will allow guests to deep dive into failures, challenges and opportunities, while also allowing people to question mental health experts to ground the issues in matters most pressing to the public.

Program 1: Our Mental Health Crisis, By Design
America’s mental health system is designed to deliver too little care, too late. Current policy and care systems devote the most resources to treating people in crisis, but provider and bed shortages remain common. How are people still finding ways to connect with help?

Program 2: Reinventing the Future of Mental Health Care
Preventative mental health care is effective and can prevent early symptoms from becoming chronic illnesses. What will it take to reform the nation’s care systems and policies so that people get the wholistic care they need to prevent a crisis?

Alone Together

April 29, 2021 – May 31, 2021

One hour

Featuring music performed by the 8 male voices of Cantus and hosted by Julie Amacher, Alone Together, is a special program highlighting mental health topics including depression and anxiety. The program is a collaboration with Call To Mind. 

Playlist:

  • When the Earth Stands Still – Don Macdonald
  • Deep Blue – Arcade Fire
  • Manifesto – David Lang
  • Twitter Song – Ingrid Michaelson
  • Calme De Nuits (Stillness of the Night) – Camille Saint-Saëns
  • River – Joni Mitchell
  • You III. You, know … who, are – Libby Larsen
  • A Most Peculiar Man – Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel
  • Camina Siempre Adelante – Alberto Cortez
  • Disappear/You Will Be Found – Benj Pasek and Justin Paul
  • We Two – Steven Stametz
  • Gesang der Mönche/Gravedigger – Beethoven/Dave Matthews
  • She’s Leaving Home – John Lennon and Paul McCartney

Questions? Please contact your Stations Relations Representative.

What’s coming up from APM April 5-11

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.

News

Marketplace

Week of April 5 

Marketplace (PM) 

  • Vaccines are finally starting to get to ag-food-processing workers and families after major delays nationwide. Marketplace’s Mitchell Hartman reports from Yakima, WA on the role of a new federal effort to make it happen through federally funded safety net health care centers–the only free/low-cost health care available to this population. 

Marketplace Tech 

  • April 5: In some parts of the country the best service might not come from wired broadband, but instead from satellite providers.  Starlink, the satellite constellation being constructed by Elon Musk’s SpaceX, is now in beta, with more than 10,000 users, and there are a bunch of other companies working in the low-earth orbit satellite space as well. We talk with Sascha Segan, a lead analyst at PC Mag who’s been following Starlink. 
  • April 6-9: Meghan McCarty Carino hosts the program. 

On Point

  • April 5: A verdict in the trial of police officer Derek Chauvin will likely coincide with the 29th anniversary of the acquittal of four white police officers in the beating of Rodney King. That verdict led to the worst race riots in the U.S. in decades. On Point asks: what did we learn from that trial, the verdict, and the response; and what does it tell us about the moment we’re in now? 
  • April 6: The $1.9 trillion American Repair Plan includes $86 billion in grants to failing multi-employer pension plans for union workers. But what about the millions of low-income Americans who have no meaningful retirement savings and little hope of fully retiring? We explore a new idea from a duo of conservative and liberal economists, Kevin Hassett and Teresa Ghilarducci, that would use an existing government program to help the poor, and even build wealth. 
  • April 7: President Biden says he wants to pay for his ambitious infrastructure plans by raising corporate taxes. That does much more than reverse the tax cuts of his predecessor — it also offers a profoundly different set of priorities in what America needs to make it competitive, who reaps the rewards, and how that gets paid for. On Point will dive into this looming battle. 

Classical

Performance Today

April 8: Performance Today will mark the Days of Remembrance, a national commemoration of the Holocaust. One of the featured pieces of music will be I Will Not Remain Silent, a violin concerto by Bruce Adolphe inspired by the life and work of Rabbi Joachim Prinz. 

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

April 9 – 1998 

  • The year of massive selling The Miseducation of Lauren Hill, still her only album to date. Bass player turned DJ Fatboy Slim made his breakthrough, Neutral Milk Hotel made an indie rock masterpiece, and we first learned the word electronica on albums by Madonna, David Gray and others. The Twin Cities band Semisonic made closing time popular, The French band Air released its innovative debut and Goo Goo Dolls had the year’s biggest hit.
  • Outside the world of music, former wrestler Jesse Ventura wins the gubernatorial race in the state of Minnesota, MLB’s Cal Ripken’s record-breaking streak ends at 2,632 consecutive games played, Jordan and the Bulls pulled off their 2nd 3-peat of the decade and bowling was popular again, thanks to the Big Lebowski. Titanic dominated at the box office and the Oscars, Sex and the City debuted and after 9 seasons and 180 episodes, that show about nothing called Seinfeld ended. 

The Splendid Table

As The Splendid Table continues to take listener home cooking questions, please follow the program’s updates on Twitter and encourage listeners to send in their questions as voice memos to contact@splendidtable.org, or via phone at 800-537-5252.  

NEW episode – April 9: Seafood at home 

  • We talk to Jennifer Bushman, an aquaculture advocate and creator of Sea Pantry, a sustainable seafood initiative and resource for the home cook.  
  • And, we’ve invited Genevieve Ko, Senior Editor of The New York Times Cooking to help Francis take listeners’ fishy-related calls. 

Questions? Please Contact your Station Representative

April 22nd is Earth Day: Celebrate all month with APM

APM has specials available to help your station commemorate Earth Day throughout April. You can find more information at our website, or contact your station representative for more information.

The Climate Question

Sundays, 9:00-9:30 a.m., 5:00-5:30 p.m., 9:30-10 p.m. ET

Mondays 4-4:30 a.m. ET.

A global, topical weekly show examining climate change and how to stop it. This program isn’t about questioning whether Climate Change is happening; it’s about finding the best ways to respond to it. This is sharp-edged, analytical inquiry, hard scrutiny, touched with a sense of adventure and discovery, and where we can find it: hope. Stories across the world on why we find it so hard to save our own planet, and how we might change that.


Download availability on wspartners.bbc.com: 23 mins or 26 mins 30 secs (or 30 mins including the News Summary, billboard & promo)

Spilling the Beans on Carbon Labelling

April 26 – May 2

23 mins or 26 mins 30 secs (30 mins including the News Bulletin, billboard & promo)

In this programme Graihagh Jackson and Neal Razzell investigate the complex issue of trying to put a useful figure on the carbon footprint of what we eat and why previous schemes that have tried to do this have failed.

Over two-thirds of global emissions are linked to what we do in our homes. That includes the choices we make about the food we eat. Quorn and Oatly are two companies that have recently begun adding carbon footprint information to their products to help us make greener choices. But what does this information really tell us about the greenhouse gas emissions created in production, and how accurate is it?

Download availability on wspartners.bbc.com: 26 minutes 30 seconds available from Mon 02:30 GMT, 23 minutes available from Sun 14:00 GMT for 7 days

Witness History: The Environment

April 1, 2021 – April 30, 2021

One hour

A special hour-long edition of Witness History from the BBC World Service. Remarkable stories of the history of the environmental movement, told by the people who were there. Selected from the BBC’s Witness History program, we hear about the major moments that changed our understanding of the planet we live on.

In Deep: The Hidden Story of America’s Troubled Water Infrastructure

March 22, 2021 – April 30, 2021

One hour

When water comes rushing out of the tap, seemingly clear and perfect, it’s easy to think we’ve got it figured out. But in reality, the underground world of pipes and sewers is in trouble. For the past year, our reporters have been doing a deep dive into America’s water infrastructure. What we’ve found is disturbing.

APM FY22 Pricing Information

APM pricing discussions for FY22 are set to begin April 5th.

Dear colleagues –

I’m writing today to share that the start of APM’s annual pricing discussions for the upcoming fiscal year will begin April 5th.

I’d like to start with a moment of reflection and a thank you. The past year provided unprecedented challenges: the COVID-19 pandemic, societal reckonings, economic challenges, political upheaval and more – all with a profound impact on each of us personally, professionally and to the service that we deliver. And yet, during these moments of extreme change and uncertainty, our shared commitment to deliver an essential service to audiences continues to strengthen, and for that we are grateful.

In preparation for APM’s FY22 pricing, we’ve had the opportunity to connect with several of you about your anticipated obstacles and opportunities in your respective markets. While we’ve heard hopeful news around market share and the glimmer of audiences rebounding, the imperative for greater diversity and inclusion, unstable dayparts and general lingering uncertainty still clouds the future.

In response, APM’s FY22 pricing season will reflect only a modest increase to news programming, remain flat year-over-year for all other products, and offer the opportunity for broader, more diverse programming options under existing APM, Marketplace and BBC affiliations:

  • Marketplace and the BBC World Service will each reflect 3% YOY increases.
  • APM Affiliation and all other APM programming will remain flat to FY21 fees.
  • APM Celebrates, our curated quarterly specials offering, will now be offered as part of APM Affiliation, allowing all affiliates to take advantage of 30-40 specials per year that offer a wide array of content, diverse presenters and a multitude content partners for your audience.

It’s our hope that this model will help put you in the best position to succeed in the year ahead during this period of change and broad uncertainty.

Your Station Relations Representative will be reaching out next week to start talking about FY21 pricing, and they will be happy to answer any questions you may have about this upcoming year. We look forward to the year ahead and our continued successful partnerships.

Sincerely,

Chandra Kavati
Vice President, Underwriting and Distribution
Chief Revenue Officer

What’s coming up from APM March 29-April 4

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.

News

Marketplace

Week of March 29

Marketplace PM

  • March 29: Kai talks with Mike Sperr, owner of CA Acrylic Design, for our series on running a micro-business in a pandemic economy.
  • For years we’ve been covering the gap between economic fundamentals and people’s lived experience. The pandemic forced policy makers to look for new ways to see what’s happening in the economy at the most granular real time level. Kai takes you inside the world of high frequency data – the companies that supply data about how you live.   

Marketplace Tech

  • March 29: The mRNA technology that brought us several COVID vaccines has promise beyond just coronavirus, and funding is pouring in. Guest: John Cumbers, founder of SynBioBeta.
  • March 30: New York Times reporter Cade Metz has a new book out called Genius Makers: The Mavericks Who Brought AI to Google, Facebook and the World.   
  • March 31: Some venture capital firms made big promises last year about diversifying the founders they invest in, and the partners doing that investing. We’ll talk with the head of one firm about those efforts: Mitch Kapor, founder of Kapor Capital.   

On Point

Week of March 29

  • March 29: American presidents are supposed to ask Congress for permission to wage war, but that almost never happens. Meghna talks with Rep. Jim McGovern and Rep. Tom Cole about the movement in Congress to strengthen the War Powers Act.
  • The WHO is set to release a report on its investigation into the origins of COVID-19. Meghna discusses serious questions around the impartiality of the report and how the COVID outbreak emerged.
  • Republican statehouses across the country are attempting to restrict the voting process. We’ll do a deep dive into one state, one law, and the lessons its story holds for the country.

Classical

Performance Today

  • In late March, Performance Today will highlight music for Passover & Easter.   

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes you back to the sounds of a specific year with a carefully curated list of the best songs. Plus, he’ll invite you to reexamine some deeper cuts as we look back on what happened that year in music, pop culture and the world.

April 2 – 1977:    

The Punk Rock and New Wave explosion was underway with debut albums from The Clash, Sex Pistols and Elvis Costello. Saturday Night Fever was soon to be an international phenomenon, Fleetwood Mac released Rumors (which went on to become one of the best-selling albums of all time), The Emotions had their biggest hit and Bill Withers dropped one of his most beloved songs. Waylon Jennings got back to the basics of love, Bob Marley was Jammin and Funkadelic brought the funk to the party while there was no partying in New York – as the Big Apple went dark during the New York City Blackout.

Meanwhile, Elvis Presley died at Graceland, a plane carrying the band Lynyrd Skynyrd crashed, killing the band’s singer Ronnie Van Zandt, guitarist Steve Gaines and his sister singer Cassie Gaines, and the first Star Wars film was released.

The Splendid Table

As The Splendid Table continues to take listener home cooking questions, please follow the program’s updates on Twitter and encourage listeners to send in their questions as voice memos to contact@splendidtable.org, or via phone at 800-537-5252.  

Encore episode – April 2: Seeds

  • Chef Dan Barber is looking at seeds with new eyes. He’s working with seed developers to bring us unique and very delicious new varieties of plants. Imagine a cucumber that is so fragrant it’s perfume can fill a room.
  • We get spring cocktail suggestions from Maggie Hoffman, author of One Bottle Cocktail.
  • America’s Test Kitchen teaches us how to make a surprising spring vegetable braise.

Questions? Please Contact your Station Representative