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Announcement — Tim de Faramond appointed as the new Editor of BBC Newshour | March 11, 2022

Tim de Faramond

We are pleased to announce that Tim de Faramond will be the new Editor of Newshour starting April 8, 2022.

Tim is currently a Front Page Editor for the international editions of the BBC News website, and has worked with BBC Minute, Today and Outside Source on TV and Radio. After a competitive set of interviews, Tim set out a clear vision for how to build on the programme’s great editorial strengths and deliver greater impact with audiences across all platforms.

“I’m delighted to welcome Tim de Faramond to this role,” shared Jon Zilkha, Controller, BBC WSE. “Newshour is carried on more than 350 US public radio stations and we know how important the program is for US audiences. We look forward to continuing to develop that service under Tim’s leadership and using his digital expertise on behalf of Newshour. As we continue to work with our partners at APM, Tim’s background and vision are well-aligned with our shared goals of reaching younger listeners and engaging all listeners on more platforms.”

“I’m honoured to return to Newshour, where I got my first ever job as a journalist, to work with one of the best teams in the business,” said Tim. “The programme’s coverage of the invasion of Ukraine has been unparalleled, and a reminder of the importance of the team’s work trying to make sense of the world every day. I look forward to empowering our journalists to keep asking the tough questions, uncovering the facts where they are obscured, and bringing you the best reporting from across the BBC. I’m a passionate believer in the power of radio and its place in today’s world to connect us, pull us out of our echo chambers and help us understand people and places we will never visit. For these reasons, Newshour is and should remain, an unmissable listen.”

Tim will fill the role currently held by Jo Floto. As previously announced, Jo has accepted a new role within the BBC as Middle East Bureau Chief and will be ending his tenure with Newshour at the end of March.

Please join us in re-welcoming Tim to Newshour!

Featured post

Announcement — Sabrina Tavernise Joins “The Daily” as a Host | March 3, 2022

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past week, Sabrina Tavernise has brought listeners of “The Daily” inside the Ukraine crisis with a steady string of urgent dispatches from the front lines. Drawing on her fluent Russian and her experience covering previous conflicts in Ukraine, as well as her years reporting in Russia, Sabrina has made the upheaval of war feel visceral and real. She has interviewed civilians receiving guns and mothers sheltering in subway tunnels. With tireless dedication, she has helped maintain “The Daily” as a home for the world’s best audio journalism, a magnet for innovation and essential listening for millions of people. 

Her reporting in Ukraine is only the latest example of her successful collaborations with the audio team, which stretch back to the early days of “The Daily” and include reporting trips across the country, from Baltimore to Oklahoma, as well as weeks spent filling in for Michael Barbaro in the host’s chair. 

All of that is why we are thrilled to announce that Sabrina will become the second host of “The Daily,” sharing hosting duties with Michael. They will take the reins on different episodes each week and allow the show to further its ambitions and reach.

Having a second host will make “The Daily” even stronger. It will allow both Michael and Sabrina to dig deeper into stories and share responsibility for The Times’s flagship show, which — as Michael himself has told us— has grown too big for one person.

It’s hard to imagine someone better suited than Sabrina. She’s an exemplary Times journalist who shares Michael’s depth and breadth of reporting experience, passion for storytelling and deep commitment to the medium of audio. Since joining The Times in 2000, she has covered major stories, from the war in Iraq to the battles over abortion to the Jan. 6 insurrection.

Sabrina has already worked on many successful projects on “The Daily,” including The Battle for Missouri, The Abortion Wars, Roe v. Wade Part One and Part Two and a five-part series on race and policing in Baltimore. Prior to her work in audio, Sabrina spent 10 years as a foreign correspondent, based in Russia, Pakistan and Turkey, where she was the Istanbul bureau chief. 

“I’m thrilled that Sabrina is joining me as a host and a full-time member of ‘The Daily’ family,” said Michael. “My admiration for her began a decade ago as a reader, when I marveled at the creativity and humanity of her journalism. When we started ‘The Daily,’ that admiration deepened as I watched her adapt those same skills to audio to create some of the most distinctive episodes we’ve ever run. Her nose for news, empathy, fair-mindedness and collegiality will all make her a fantastic host and partner.”

Sabrina is joining a show with big ambitions and enormous reach. In just the past year, more than 130 journalists have appeared as guests on the show, including a number of exemplary guest hosts. Since the show launched five years ago, “The Daily” has been downloaded more than three billion times. It’s carried on 265 public radio stations in the U.S. through our partnership with American Public Media. It has built an original music library of 230 compositions, has won a duPont Award and has been part of two Pulitzer Prize-winning lines of coverage, appeared on countless best-of lists and remains the most-listened-to news podcast in the country. 

“I fell in love with audio when I first worked with ‘The Daily’ and its brilliant creators a few years ago,” said Sabrina. “The emotional power of hearing people’s voices — and the music and the drums — took storytelling to a whole new level. I felt like I was suddenly seeing colors, after a lifetime in black and white. I am so excited at the thought of joining this incredible team.”

We’ll give the final word to our listeners. Here’s one from Biddeford, Maine: “It’s easy to think of events like the invasion of Ukraine as something that is happening far away and that has little to do with us here safe in the U.S.  Through her exceptional reporting, Sabrina makes this harder to do.”

Dean Baquet, Lisa Chow, Sam Dolnick and Paula Szuchman

Your week at a glance: May 16-22, 2022

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

  • May 17: Kai talks with former Fed Chair Ben Bernanke about his new book 21st Century Monetary Policy and the state of monetary policy today.

Marketplace Tech

  • Kimberly Adams continues to serve as the interim host of Marketplace Tech.
  • May 16: Marketplace Tech looks at federal funding for the expansion of broadband access in rural and low-income areas, with guest Will Rinehart from the Center for Growth and Opportunity.
  • May 17: Marketplace Tech has an obituary for the iPod, including listener voices and stories.
  • May 18: A look at the technology behind fetal viability outside the womb, and

On Point

  • May 16: The anti-abortion movement in the US is rooted in Conservative Christian beliefs about when life begins. Now that a leaked draft written by Justice Samuel Alito indicates that the Supreme Court is likely to overturn the constitutional right to an abortion, what does it mean for people who don’t hold those beliefs? What are the consequences of overturning Roe vs Wade for Jewish and Muslim women and their religious and reproductive rights?
  • May 18: The Conservative Political Action Committee’s annual conference gets underway in Hungary today. Its keynote speaker is Hungary’s authoritarian prime minister, Viktor Orban. Political scholars look at the Orban regime as a textbook case of rapid democratic decline. We revisit an On Point episode from last year in which we ask if the US is moving in a similar direction and find out what Hungary can teach the US about accelerating authoritarianism.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

May 20 – 2007

  • The Time Machine makes a trip to 2007 this time. Both M.I.A & Kanye West had big tunes featuring prominent samples. Robert Plant and Alison Krauss collaborated on the Raising Sand album. Radiohead turned the music business on its head by using a pay what you want business model on their In Rainbows album. The White Stripes made their final studio album, while Bon Iver released its debut record in the north woods of Wisconsin. Mavis Staples revisited some of the Civil Rights anthems of the 50’s and 60’s & Arcade Fire released its highly anticipated 2nd album.
  • Beyond the world of music: Al Gore won the Nobel Peace Prize. The New England Patriots ran the table, going undefeated in 2007, but lost to the Giants in the Super Bowl in early ‘08. The San Antonio Spurs swept Lebron and the Cleveland Cavaliers to win the NBA title. Mad Men debuted and popularized cocktail culture & the Simpsons became movie stars. It’s 2007 our year on this episode of Time Machine from the Current.

The Splendid Table

New episode – May 20: Your cooking and eating questions

  • This week Francis is taking your cooking and eating questions with Daniel Holzman and Matt Rodbard, authors of Food IQ: 100 Questions, Answers, and Recipes to Raise Your Cooking Smarts.
  • And then, we head into the kitchen with J. Kenji López-Alt for a lesson from his new book The Wok: Recipes and Techniques.

Timely Selections

Digital / Marketing tool from the BBC World Service

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these shareable videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and follow the link below to explore the library of videos!

VIEW VIDEOS HERE

Questions? Reach out to your Station Relations Representative.

Small Change: Women of Color Building a Business Legacy

Broadcast Window: April 4, 2022 – May 31, 2022

Length: One hour

This installment from Small Change highlights the stories of five minority women-owned small business owners—Native, Black and Latina that looks at the time and sweat equity it took to start the businesses, the critical pivots they made to keep their businesses afloat during the early months of the pandemic, and what they are doing now to keep their businesses running and growing. Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Your week at a glance: May 9-15, 2022

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

Week of May 9

  • Kai talks to Claire Babineaux-Fontenot, CEO of Feeding America, about how the largest hunger relief organization in the US is facing new challenges—-rising inflation and food insecurity.
  • Kai talks with Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky about how living on Airbnb has changed the way he thinks about the company.

Marketplace Tech

  • Kimberly Adams continues to serve as the interim host of Marketplace Tech.
  • May 9: Kimberly Adams speaks with Helen Genova, Kessler Foundation, about initiatives within the tech industry to support and hire neurodiverse talent—employees with ADHA, autism, dyslexia or other developmental conditions.

On Point

  • May 9: In the United States, Roe v Wade is on the brink of being overturned. But across Latin America, in places like Chile, Argentina, Colombia and Uruguay, abortion access is expanding. On Point asks, why is the United States going in the opposite direction from much of the rest of the world on abortion rights?
  • May 10: China shows no signs of abandoning its severe Covid-zero policy. On Point asks why China remains committed to eradicating every outbreak of coronavirus with strict lockdowns and quarantines, despite a lack of evidence that Covid-zero is an effective public health strategy. And how is that strategy impacting the relationship that people in places like Shanghai have with their government?
  • May 11: From 1944 to 1986, tens of millions of tons of Uranium ore were mined from Navajo lands to make nuclear weapons. Thousands of Navajo who worked in uranium mines and lived down-wind from nuclear weapons tests suffered the effects of radiation exposure. Since 1990 they have been compensated for their exposure-related health care costs by a congressionally mandated program. But that mandate is set to expire in July unless Congress acts. On Point asks whether it’s time not just to extend the law, but also expand it.
  • May 13: If you consult three doctors and get three different opinions, that’s an example of what Nobel Prize-winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman and his colleagues call “noise.” How do you decide what to do when professionals don’t agree? On Point asks how to cut through the noise that hinders human judgement.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

May 13 – 1975

  • The Time Machine stops in 1975 this time! A year classic albums from iconic artists like Bruce Springsteen, Bob Dylan & bands like Led Zeppelin & Pink Floyd. A 6 minute suite by the band Queen became one of the biggest songs in rock history. The band War celebrated Latino car culture with the song Low Rider. Parliament brought the funk to the party while Fleetwood Mac recorded its first album with new members Stevie Nicks and Lindsay Buckingham. Abba was becoming an international phenomenon and you probably got your first mood ring in 1975, remember those?
  • Beyond the world of music: If you went to the movies you might have caught One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest & thanks to the film Jaws, we were all afraid of the water. It’s 1975, our year, this time on Time Machine from The Current.

The Splendid Table

Repeat episode – May 13: Jacques Pépin

  • This week we spend an entire hour talking and cooking in Jacques Pépin’s kitchen. The legendary chef weighs in on the merits of his classic training, which began at age 13. He talks about the years he spent cooking for the Prime Minister of France, he weighs in on the current culinary school scene and teaches us to make an insanely easy and delicious Instant Cured gravlax. Then, we talk to Bridget Lancaster of America’s Test Kitchen about how Jacques’ book, La Technique, changed her life.

Timely Selections

Digital / Marketing tool from the BBC World Service

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these shareable videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and follow the link below to explore the library of videos!

VIEW VIDEOS HERE

Questions? Reach out to your Station Relations Representative.

Spotlight on Youth Mental Health During Covid

Broadcast Window: May 1, 2022 – June 30, 2022

Length: One hour

Spotlight on Youth Mental Health During Covid shares the mental health experiences of young people during the COVID-19 pandemic, explores the extent of the crisis and considers how schools and the systems of care available to young people can improve.

Through interviews with young people, expert clinicians, educators, and others – this special will examine the mental health toll of the pandemic the impacts on the American public moving forward.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Your week at a glance: May 2 – 8, 2022

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

Week of May 2

  • Tuesday, May 3: Kai talks to Katherine Tai, the US Trade Representative.
  • The last time the US suffered a long bout of inflation back in the 70s, it led to what’s known as a wage-price spiral: prices went up, so wages went up, too, which caused prices to go up even more. Rinse and repeat. Marketplace’s Mitchell Hartman looks into whether that’s likely to happen during this round of inflation.

Marketplace Tech

  • Kimberly Adams continues to serve as the interim host of Marketplace Tech.
  • May 2: Marketing Tech looks at the regulatory landscape for big social media companies (or lack thereof) and how it differs from the U.S. and other nations. As Elon Musk looks to changes on Twitter, how will new regulations in Europe affect his plans?
  • May 3: Kimberly speaks with former Nintendo of America President Reggie Fils-Amie on his new biography Disrupting the Game and his insights into the game industry.
  • May 4: Kimberly interviews Emerson Brooking, senior fellow at the Atlantic Council’s Digital Forensic Research Lab, about Russian use of RuTube and YouTube during the ongoing war with Ukraine.
  • May 5: We’ll hear how big tech is trying to be more inclusive and supportive of neurodiverse talent in the workforce. Are these efforts working? We’ll feature a neurodiverse employee within the industry (guest TBD).

On Point

  • May 3: Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has called state lawmakers into a special session next month to address the state’s property insurance crisis. Multiple insurance companies have withdrawn from the state or gone out of business and homeowners across the state have had their policies canceled. Behind this is a tale of what happens when litigation replaces legislation.
  • May 5: The US is approaching a grim milestone – one million dead from COVID-19. Many more Americans are figuring out what life looks like without someone they love. On Point explores how we as individuals, and collectively, mark this milestone.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

May 6 – 1983

  • The Time Machine stops in 1983 this time. In the pop world it was a big year for women with big debuts from both Madonna and Cindy Lauper. David Bowie became a superstar with the release of his Nile Rogers produced album Let’s Dance. His guitarist on the album was Stevie Ray Vaughan, who released his debut Texas Flood the same year. In the college rock world there were debuts from REM and Big Country. UB40 helped popularize reggae with their covers album Labour of Love. There was no sophomore slump for Lionel Richie and Culture Club, who both released huge 2nd albums.
  • Beyond the world of music: Sally Ride became the first American woman to travel in space when the space shuttle Challenger was launched. The precursor to American Idol and The Voice, the show Star Search debuted, which was hosted by Ed McMahan. The Star Wars flick Return of the Jedi ruled the box office & you may have killed time with your Rubik’s cube. Its 1983 our year on this episode of Time Machine from The Current.

The Splendid Table

New episode – May 6: Evan Kleinman

  • Evan Kleiman has never been a big self-promoter, but she has had one of the most influential careers in American food. First as a groundbreaking chef in Los Angeles with her Italian restaurant Angeli Caffe, and then by conducting thousands of interviews as the host of Good Food from KCRW. It’s one of our favorite food shows and so, this week, we’re spending the hour talking to her about her life and all the places food has taken her and her listeners.

Timely Selections

Digital / Marketing tool from the BBC World Service

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these shareable videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and follow the link below to explore the library of videos!

VIEW VIDEOS HERE

Questions? Reach out to your Station Relations Representative.

Cinco de Mayo: ¡Viva México!

Broadcast Window: April 28, 2022 – May 31, 2022

Length: One hour

Cinco de Mayo celebrates the anniversary of the Battle of Puebla, an event where the Mexican army defeated the French forces of Napoleon the Third. Although Cinco de Mayo isn’t particularly celebrated in Mexico, it remains a day that acknowledges Mexican heritage in the United States.

In this special, Ines Guanchez will share the history of Cinco do Mayo through the music of Mexican and Chicano composers from the past and present that celebrates Mexican national pride and heritage.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Your week at a glance: April 25 – May 1, 2022

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

Week of April 25

  • Why don’t we have disaggregated measures of inflation – how much people spend based on their income and where they live? Kai explains, along with what it would look like if we did.
  • Kai talks with Anna Stansbury about a new working paper on socioeconomic diversity in economics.

Marketplace Tech

  • Meghan McCarty Carino will host Marketplace Tech April 25-26, and Kimberly Adams hosts the program April 27-29.
  • April 25: Meghan McCarty Carino reports on how companies like IBM are increasingly evaluating candidates based on their skills instead of college degrees or other accolades. Skills-first hiring focuses on specific talents candidates might bring to a company, but filtering for those skills during the recruitment process can be a challenge. Still, this approach might lower barriers to IT jobs and help diversify the tech industry.
  • April 26: Marketplace Tech interviews Egill Hauksson, research professor of geophysics, about earthquake detection technology. Earlier this month, a group of researchers at Stanford University published a report about their deep-learning algorithm that “de-noises” cities and detects earthquakes – trained on 80,000 datasets. Late last year, another group of researchers from Penn State also published a report about their earthquake detection technology that they have been working on from a lab. But overall, earthquake detection technology still isn’t where it needs to be. We’ll get into why that is.

On Point

  • April 25: Social psychologist Jonathan Haight joins Meghna to talk about the impact that social media is having on society in the US, or as the title of a recent piece he wrote for The Atlantic puts it, “Why the past ten years of American life have been uniquely stupid.”
  • April 27: We look at NATO’s last big expansion in the mid 1990’s, after the collapse of the Soviet Union, and ask about the role that played in creating the current dynamic between Russia, Europe, and the US.
  • April 28: On Point takes a deep dive into the consequences and challenges of Sweden and Finland saying that they are applying for NATO membership, in light of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Given the history, should they be admitted? .

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

April 29 – 1965

  • The Time Machine makes a stop in 1965 this time…It was a huge year for Bob Dylan, he made not one, but two classic albums in the same year, He got booed a lot too, for plugging in his guitar. Motown was selling records like hotcakes with releases from The Supremes, The Four Tops and others. British Invasion bands dominated the airwaves, as The Beatles made their 2nd film, played to 55,000 at Shea Stadium and released the excellent Rubber Soul album, The Rolling Stones had their biggest hit yet on a song that came to Keith Richards in his sleep. The Who issued their debut album and the Animals and the Kinks emerged. Little Milton and Petula Clark had their biggest year. Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass ruled the Easy Listening world.
  • Beyond the world of music: The Sound of Music was the biggest film of the year and Bonanza was the most popular show on TV. It’s all 1965 our year on this episode of Time Machine from The Current.

The Splendid Table

Repeat episode – April 29: Japanese Home Cooking

  • This week, we are talking about Japanese home cooking– and not ramen or sushi. Sonoko Sakai, the author of Japanese Home Cooking, tells us about the Japanese curry everyone makes at home.
  • Ivan Orkin and Chris Ying, authors of The Gaijin Cookbook, give us a lesson in Japanese kid-food.
  • Chef Shintaro of NYC’s Bar Moga teaches us how to make the delicious fried rice omelet, omurice.

Timely Selections

Digital / Marketing tool from the BBC World Service

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these shareable videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and follow the link below to explore the library of videos!

VIEW VIDEOS HERE
Questions? Reach out to your Station Relations Representative.

Melodies of Freedom

Broadcast Window: April 5 – April 30, 2022
Length: One hour

Melodies of Freedom is a musical celebration of Passover that will explore the power of music to bring people together.

Featured music includes A Seder for Peace by Stewart Grant written for a seder that brought together Israelis and Palestinians, Christians, Muslims, and Jews for the cause of peace in the Middle East. We’ll also hear Passover Psalm by Erich Wolfgang Korngold who overcame personal tragedy during the Holocaust.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Your week at a glance: April 18-24, 2022

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

Week of April 18

  • A group of hedge funds is betting that a lynchpin of the cryptocurrency ecosystem is about to tank; the “Big Short” for crypto. “Tether” is the leading crypto “stablecoin,” a class of crypto asset that is supposed to be pegged to the U.S. dollar and not fluctuate as dramatically as Bitcoin or Ethereum. Stablecoins are the secret lubricant of cryptocurrency trading, allowing traders to easily buy and sell crypto without having to constantly cash out to non-crypto assets— more than 75% of trades on crypto exchanges involve stablecoins. If the hedge funds are right that’s a big problem, not just for crypto but for the mainstream financial system too. The US Treasury has been warning about the systemic risk posed by stablecoins for years, comparing it to the “shadow banking” system that precipitated the 2008 financial crisis. Marketplace’s Matt Levin has this explainer on what stablecoin is, and why you should care.

Marketplace Tech

  • Meghan McCarty Carino will host Marketplace Tech April 18-22.
  • April 18: In advance of Netflix’s earnings release, Marketplace Tech will look at the platform’s entrée into gaming. Netflix has already bought three boutique video game studios. Games have historically been at the forefront of technological advancements and have seen the rewards of them more immediately, at least in the last few decades. We’ll look at the future of gaming and Netflix.
  • April 19: Marketplace Tech looks at the growth of tech hubs outside of the typical Silicon Valley areas, in places like Miami and beyond.
  • April 20: Marketplace Tech talks with Nina Jankowicz about her new book How to be a Woman Online: Surviving abuse and harassment and how to fight back.

On Point

  • Kimberly Atkins Stohr hosts On Point April 18-22.
  • April 18: Kimberly Atkins Stohr speaks with journalist Danielle Friedman about the fascinating – but complicated – history of women in fitness. Her new book, Let’s get Physical, explores the intersection of exercise, image, and power.
  • April 20: Earlier this month the CDC announced that Title 42 at the US-Mexico border will end on May 23rd. Title 42 is the Trump era policy, implemented at the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, which allowed the US to expel migrants without a hearing. Critics have called it inhumane, but there are concerns that the policy is being terminated without a plan in place to deal with large numbers of migrants seeking to cross the border. On Point takes a close look at the impact and legacy of Title 42.
  • April 21: Atlanta Journal-Constitution politics reporter Greg Bluestein joins Kimberley Atkins Stohr to talk about the how the Georgia governor’s race is heating up and how this election, and ones to come, will reveal whether Democrat’s success in turning the state people will last. Bluestein is the author of FLIPPED: How Georgia Turned Purple and Broke the Monopoly on Republican Power.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

April 22 – 1999

  • This time we party like it’s 1999. It was the year Santana became a pop star with his Supernatural recording, which was one of the biggest albums of the year and the biggest of his long respected career. Foo Fighters were all over the radio dial. Moby released his Play effort, which would go on to become the best-selling electronic album of all time. Q-Tip of A Tribe Called Quest fame, issued his solo debut. Speaking of first albums, the English singer Dido emerged bigtime. Wilco were becoming critics darlings. TLC recorded one of the catchiest song of the year which became their 3rd #1 single.
  • Beyond the world of music: Former grocery store stocker Kurt Warner was the talk of the NFL, winning the MVP and the Superbowl for the St. Louis Rams. The San Antonio Spurs won the franchise’s first championship, becoming the first former ABA team to win an NBA title. The way we listen to music changed forever as Napster debuted and we first learned what file sharing is. It’s 1999 our Year on Time Machine form the Current.

The Splendid Table

New episode – April 22: Special Sauces

  • This week, we’re looking at some of the world’s “Special Sauces.” René Redzepi of Copenhagen’s Noma joins us to talk about the delicious ancient sauce, garum.
  • Diep Tran, the co-author of The Red Boat Fish Sauce Cookbook, brings us ideas for using that liquid gold in everyday recipes.

Timely Selections

Digital / Marketing tool from the BBC World Service

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these shareable videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and follow the link below to explore the library of videos!

VIEW VIDEOS HERE

Questions? Reach out to your Station Relations Representative.

Witness History: The Environment

Broadcast Window: April 1 – April 30, 2022
Length: One hour

A special hour-long edition of Witness History from the BBC World Service. Remarkable stories of the history of the environmental movement, told by the people who were there. Selected from the BBC’s Witness History program, we hear about the major moments that changed our understanding of the planet we live on. We’ll hear about the discovery of whale song – a book that kickstarted the movement against pesticides – and the story of a child climate activist who spoke with passion and anger, back in 1992.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

BBC Monthly: May Docs, Specials and Video Selections | April 13, 2022

Coming in May 2022

Featuring voices from across the U.S. and around the globe, connect your audience to the world with these unique stories and perspectives. This month, we evaluate the information war being fought over Ukraine and the Yaquis fight for continued independence in Mexico, discover how scientists and researchers hope to utilize micro-robots as a medical tool and cactus juice for plastic, and celebrate Kristal Ambrose’s role in the Bahamas ban on single use plastic. See below for details and more unique stories.

Visit our website to learn more, and find links to ContentDepot for programs, promos and billboards.

As a BBC affiliate, you have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Visit the BBC Media Partner Centre to take advantage of this opportunity and increase your social media presence with consistent, shareable videos centering topics aligned with your audience’s interests.

See below for a curated selection of high performing videos.


Docs and Specials

*If you would like to request an air window extension, please contact your station representative. Extensions are considered on a case-by-case basis and may be granted subject to rights.

The Documentary: War on Truth

One hour
April 30, 2022 – May 6, 2022

The BBC’s specialist disinformation reporter Marianna Springs investigates the extraordinary information war being fought over Ukraine through the stories of those who have become caught up in it. This conflict is happening parallel to the battle on the ground – and it’s a fight that also has real consequences for the people whose lives it touches. Marianna tracks their tales, and the twists and turns of information warfare.

Assignment: Mexico: the Yaqui fight back

Half hour
May 5 – 11, 2022

In Mexico, the Yaqui of Sonora are known as, ‘the undefeated’. In spite of being hunted, enslaved and exiled, they are the only indigenous group never to have surrendered to Spanish colonial forces or the Mexican government. Somehow, eight communities survived dotted along the River Yaqui. But there are deep divisions. Most of all, over whether a gas pipeline should be allowed on their land. Anabela Carlon is a legal representative for the Yaqui, and is adamant it will not happen.

The Documentary: The Advertising Trap

One hour
May 21 – 27, 2022

Digital advertising has taken over the world. But is it all based on smoke and mirrors? Ed Butler investigates what some people claim is a massive collective deception – a trillion dollar marketing pitch that simply doesn’t deliver value to any of those paying for it.


Monthly BBC Video Selections:

View the instructional guide and social media best practices resource available on our website. Please share all BBC videos within two weeks of downloading them on the BBC Media Partner Centre. Click the links and images below to watch and download these videos.

Why is That?: The robot smaller than the width of a hair

  • Description: Scientists at Cornell University have created a tiny micro-robot that “walks” using four legs. Invisible to the naked eye, 10 of the computer chip bots could fit within the full-stop at the end of this sentence. Their legs can be independently triggered to bend using laser light. As the laser is toggled back and forth between the front and back legs, the robot walks. It would take less than a week to make a swarm of a million of the robots, which Itai Cohen and Paul McEuen Labs hope could be adapted to become a medical tool. They are small enough to be injected into the body and Prof Cohen hopes eventually robots like these could be designed to hunt down and destroy cancer cells. (Image: Microbot, Credit: Marc Miskin / Itai Cohen and Paul McEuen Labs / Cornell University, USA.) Video by Jennifer Green, interview by Ania Lichtarowicz and Gareth Mitchell.
  • Suggested social copy: Scientists have created a microscopic walking robot that is shorter, thinner and narrower than the width of a human hair.
  • Duration: 1 minute 24 seconds

People Fixing the World: How to make biodegradable ‘plastic’ from cactus juice

  • Description: This Mexican researcher has discovered a way to turn cactus leaves into a material with similar properties to plastic. She says it’s not toxic and is biodegradable. A film by Tom Heyden for People Fixing the World.
  • Suggested social copy: A Mexican researcher turning cactus leaves into a plastic-like material.
  • Duration: 2 minutes 33 seconds

Global Citizen: The teacher who convinced The Bahamas to ban plastic

  • Description: Kristal Ambrose founded The Bahamas Plastic Movement in 2013 and aims to tackle the serious problem of plastic pollution in The Bahamas. The 29-year-old started tuition-free youth camps in order to educate the country’s children and also drafted a bill which she took to the environment minister. Her work meant that The Bahamas introduced a nationwide ban on single-use plastic in 2020. (Photo: Kristal Ambrose. Credit: Goldman Environmental Prize) Video produced by Daniel South.
  • Suggested social copy: Kristal Ambrose founded The Bahamas Plastic Movement in 2013 and aims to tackle the serious problem of plastic pollution in The Bahamas.
  • Duration: 2 minutes 46 seconds

Wellbeing: Gong baths: Meditating through sound

  • Description: A gong bath is a sound bath that “cleanses” the mind and the body. It’s a tradition that goes back 4,000 years but Suraya Sam’s 90 minute sessions are popular with millennials in Singapore. Produced by Olive Faure and Karishma Chanrai Filmed by Tariq Hawari Photo: A woman sitting in front of a gong Credit: BBC.
  • Suggested social copy: Relax and find out about 90 minute gong bath sessions in Singapore.
  • Duration: 3 minutes 2 seconds

Your week at a glance: April 11-17

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

BBC World Service

Ukraine coverage: The BBC World Service schedule is being modified on a week-to-week basis to accommodate coverage of the developments in Ukraine. Be sure to set your ContentDepot preferences to consistently receive Alert – Breaking News Advisory or Alert – Program Update messaging for the latest changes.

Set change for April 4-May 6:

  • 4-4:30 a.m. ET – Extra edition of The Newsroom.

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

Week of April 11

  • Kai talks with Stefan Al about his new book Supertall: How the World’s Tallest Buildings Are Reshaping Our Cities and Our Lives.
  • Kai talks with Amy Gajda about her new book Seek and Hide about the tangled history of the right to privacy.

Marketplace Tech

  • Kimberly Adams continues to serve as the interim host of Marketplace Tech.
  • The Department of Agriculture wants to modernize one of the country’s largest federal nutrition programs: the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, or WIC. That program aims to help low-income mothers and their children by providing credit to buy healthy food. Modernizing it means it could make it easier for families to order groceries and even complete the transaction online, but there are existing federal regulations that stand in the way.

On Point

  • April 11: Thanks to open-source intelligence gatherers we know more about how the war in Ukraine is happening in real time than any previous conflict. Anyone with an internet connection can hear the confusion of Russian battlefield commanders, or soldiers phoning home describing their looting. We can also easily access images of apparent atrocities. On Point explores what open-source intelligence is revealing about the war in Ukraine and what that means for our understanding of the conflict.
  • April 12: Meghna speaks with Nina Jankowicz, the author of How to Lose the Information War: Russia, Fake News, and the Future of Conflict. Its publication brought her a tirade of harassment and online abuse, mostly from men. That experience is the inspiration for her latest book, How to Be a Woman Online: Surviving Abuse and Harassment, and How to Fight Back.
  • April 15: Meghna’s guest for the hour is William Taylor, US Ambassador to Ukraine from 2006 to 2009 and the vice president of Russia and Europe at the US Institute of Peace.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

April 15 – 1957

  • The way back machine makes a stop in 1957 this time. There were exciting new artists emerging. Ray Charles released his very first album. After appearing on Arthur Godfrey’s Talent Scouts, Patsy Cline released her first single which became an instant classic. Jerry Lee Lewis and The Everly Brothers both had huge hits though their songs were banned on many radio stations because the content was deemed too suggestive. Elvis was busy, he starred in his third film, Jailhouse Rock and his theme song was number one in ten countries. Fats Domino, Chuck Berry and Buddy Holly were all over the radio.
  • Beyond the world of music: Dwight D. Eisenhower began his second term as President. Leave It To Beaver debuted. The Detroit Lions, yeah the Lions won the NFL Championship and gas was thirty-one cents a gallon. It’s all 1957, our year on this episode of Time Machine from The Current.

The Splendid Table

Repeat episode – April 15: Eastern Mediterranean

  • We are headlong into the food of the Eastern Mediterranean with the author of Ripe Figs, Recipes, and Stories from Turkey, Greece, and Cyprus, Yasmin Khan.
  • Then we head to the Arab world with Palestinian writer Reem Kassis and her new book, Arabesque: Contemporary Recipes from the Arab World.

Timely Selections

Digital / Marketing tool from the BBC World Service

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these shareable videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and follow the link below to explore the library of videos!

VIEW VIDEOS HERE

Questions? Reach out to your Station Relations Representative.

Spotlight on the Confusion of Covering Mental Health Care

Broadcast Window: April 4, 2022 – May 31, 2022

Length: One hour

Spotlight on the Confusion of Covering Mental Health Care is an hour-long program that will help make sense of why the health insurance industry is unable to show how they try to provide mental health parity and equity for common mental illnesses like anxiety, depression, substance use and eating disorders. Listeners will discover how people can identify when they have had their health care unfairly delayed or denied, and learn about the mounting costs on individuals, families, and the nation when plans do not provide equitable care. Additional program details on Content Depot.

*The release of this program was postponed by the Department of Labor (DOL) report missing Congress’ Dec. 27, 2021 deadline. Program content was all produced after the 2022 Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA) Report was made public Jan. 25, 2022.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Your week at a glance: April 4-10

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

BBC World Service

Ukraine coverage: The BBC World Service schedule is being modified on a week-to-week basis to accommodate coverage of the developments in Ukraine. Be sure to set your ContentDepot preferences to consistently receive Alert – Breaking News Advisory or Alert – Program Update messaging for the latest changes.

Set change for April 4-8:

  • 4-4:30 a.m. ET – Extra edition of The Newsroom.

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

Week of April 4

  • The US used its control over the global financial system to punish Russia for its invasion. It froze US dollar reserves of Russia’s central bank, leaning on the US dollar’s status as a global reserve currency, particularly for the sale of oil. It also cut off Visa and MasterCard payments, and imposed far-reaching sanctions that threaten anyone working with Russian financial institutions with exclusion from the US financial system. In response we saw Russia preemptively develop its own payment system that now hopes to expand to Iran and Venezuela, and China has done the same. As Marketplace’s Sabri Ben-Achour reports, will we see the development of a world in which the United States, strategic competitors, and foes build parallel financial systems, rendering US influence less powerful for decades to come?

Marketplace Tech

  • Kimberly Adams continues to serve as the interim host of Marketplace Tech.

On Point

  • April 4: We explore what would it take for a Russia-Ukraine peace agreement. Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelensky wants concrete security guarantees. Would Russia accept? Would the US and Europe support a deal in which Ukraine commits to neutrality?
  • April 5: A solutions-driven discussion about teacher shortages in the US. Teacher shortages have been a challenge long before COVID. How are these shortages impacting students, and how do we build a more sustainable environment for teachers?
  • April 7: The number of Americans quitting their jobs continued at a record pace in February according to newly released federal data. AFL-CIO president Liz Shuler says call it the ‘great resignation’ if you want, but she prefers to think of it as the ‘great reimagination’ and an opportunity to reverse the decades long decline in union membership in the US. Host Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Shuler about her vision for the AFL-CIO and the wider union movement in the US.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

April 8 – 2004

  • A banner year for Canadian artists. k.d. lang issued her Hymns from the 49th Parallel, where she recorded songs by her favorite artists from north of the border, Arcade Fire released their excellent debut & Tegan and Sara recorded their biggest tune to date. After a false start Green Day released an album that was later developed into a successful musical. Old Crow Medicine Show added verses to an old Bob Dylan chorus he wrote in 1973 and created a classic.
  • Beyond the world of music: We learned that U2’s Bono couldn’t count very well in Spanish. NASA rover touches down on Mars and signals Earth. George W. Bush is reelected president. We first heard the term “wardrobe malfunction”. Tom Brady was on his way to his 3rd Superbowl Win. The Bad Boys of Detroit beat the Lakers to win the NBA title. Friends and Frazier signed off after long successful runs on TV. It’s all 2004, our year on this Time Machine from The Current.

The Splendid Table

Repeat episode – April 8: Seafood

  • This week, we’re all about buying seafood when you’re doing the cooking at home. We talk to Jennifer Bushman, an aquaculture advocate and creator of Sea Pantry, a sustainable seafood initiative, and resource for the home cook.
  • And, since we know you have questions, we’ve invited the Senior Editor of The New York Times Cooking, Genevieve Ko, to help Francis take your fishy-related calls.

Timely Selections

Digital / Marketing tool from the BBC World Service

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these shareable videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and follow the link below to explore the library of videos!

VIEW VIDEOS HERE

Questions? Reach out to your Station Relations Representative.

Melodies of Freedom

Broadcast Window: April 5, 2022 – April 30, 2022

Length: One hour

Melodies of Freedom is a musical celebration of Passover that will explore the power of music to bring people together.

Featured music includes A Seder for Peace by Stewart Grant written for a seder that brought together Israelis and Palestinians, Christians, Muslims, and Jews for the cause of peace in the Middle East. We’ll also hear Passover Psalm by Erich Wolfgang Korngold who overcame personal tragedy during the Holocaust.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

FY23 Pricing Update | March 30, 2022

Dear colleagues –

I hope this message finds you, your families, friends and co-workers well.  I’m writing today to share that APM’s annual pricing discussions for the upcoming fiscal year will begin on April 4, 2022.

Over the past year, together we’ve witnessed an insurrection against the US Capitol, navigated the continued uncertainties of the Covid-19 pandemic, felt the impact of the Great Resignation and now feel the reckoning of an irresolute geo-political conflict.

Yet, in these moments we’ve continued our collective commitment to audience, clarity of mission, resiliency and creativity. New perspectives and voices have been introduced to our airwaves on a local, regional, national and international level that have proven to inform and inspire audiences. While the past year has challenged us with its unpredictability, our programming and your continued partnerships have remained strong and consistent. We thank you for your support.

This year APM’s FY23 pricing season will reflect a modest increase to news programming, remain flat year-over-year for all other products, include new products to our distribution offer and continue to offer broader, more diverse programming options under existing APM, Marketplace and BBC affiliations:

  • The BBC World Service and On Point will reflect 3% YOY increases.
  • APM Affiliation, Marketplace and all other APM programming will remain flat to FY22 fees.
  • As shared in a joint press release earlier this week, the distribution of Classical 24 (C24) will transition to APM from PRX effective July 1, 2022, with programming fees remaining flat YOY.
  • APM Celebrates, our curated quarterly specials offering, APM Reports and Time Machine will continue to be included as part of your overall APM Affiliation.

Last, APM has streamlined our station Affiliation, Carriage and Broadcast agreements to better serve your needs. The updates are an effort to offer shorter, more efficient and accessible documentation for your business process.

It’s our hope that this model will help put you in the best position to succeed in the year ahead. Your Station Relations Representative will be reaching out next week to start the discussion about FY23 pricing and will be happy to answer any questions you may have.

We look forward to the upcoming year and our continued successful partnerships.

Sincerely,

Chandra Kavati
SVP, Chief Partnerships and Revenue Officer

Your week at a glance: March 28-April 3

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

BBC World Service

Ukraine coverage: The BBC World Service schedule is being modified on a day-to-day basis to accommodate coverage of the developments in Ukraine. Be sure to set your ContentDepot preferences to consistently receive Alert – Breaking News Advisory or Alert – Program Update messaging for the latest changes.

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

Week of March 28

  • Kai checks in with Nan Kohler, an independent grain producer in Pasadena, California.
  • Lyft recently announced this week that it’s allowing riders to round up their fare to the nearest dollar, and the change will be donated to emergency relief efforts in Ukraine. Researchers have discovered that more people will agree to rounding up a purchase than giving money straight up. Marketplace’s Stephanie Hughes explains what’s the psychology at work here, what sort of money does it lead to, and who benefits?

Marketplace Tech

  • Kimberly Adams continues to serve as the interim host of Marketplace Tech.
  • March 28: We told you last week about a small town in Texas that’s quickly becoming ground zero for cryptocurrency mining in the country because of the electrical infrastructure leftover from the 1950s. What else do they have a lot of in Texas? Oil and gas. Some entrepreneurs are trying to marry the two industries and solve a set of problems for both parties.

On Point

  • March 28: With the Ukraine war now in its second month, On Point speaks with Lawrence Wilkerson and Alexander Vindman. Wilkerson is a retired US Army Colonel and former chief of staff to Secretary of State Colin Powell. Ukrainian-born Vindman was Director of European Affairs for the National Security Council in the Trump administration. He testified about Trump’s notorious phone call with Ukrainian President Zelensky.
  • March 30: As mask mandates are dropped here in the US and workers finally return to their offices, South Korea is experiencing its deadliest COVID surge since the pandemic began more than two years ago. Despite that, it too is easing its COVID restrictions. On Point explores what that tells us about shifting attitudes about how we live with the coronavirus.
  • March 31: On Point looks into how the Kremlin and some right-wing commentators and news sites here in the US are echoing each other’s talking points over the war in Ukraine.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

April 1 – 1985

  • The Time Machine makes a stop in 1985 this time. It was the year that the USA for Africa took a cue from Band Aid & helped feed the world. Tears for Fears Songs from the Big Chair album hit #1 on both sides of the pond. Prince made his most psychedelic album of his career. Aretha Franklin had her 20th #1 R&B hit. The supergroup The Power Station dropped their debut, as did ‘Til Tuesday.
  • Beyond the world of music: Pete Rose breaks Ty Cobb’s All-Time Hit Record of 4,191 hits. Michael J Fox went back to the future. It was the year that New Coke came and went. Larry King Live was launched on CNN.  On the technology front the first .com was registered, and Windows 1.0 was released. Its 1985 our year on Time Machine from The Current.

The Splendid Table

New Episode – April 1: Best Books of Spring 2022

  • Chef Asma Kahn joins us to talk about her mother, monsoons, and her new book Amma: Indian Home Cooking to Nourish Your Soul.
  • We head deep into the foods of Mexico with Rick Martinez, author of Mi Cocina: Recipes and Rapture from My Kitchen in Mexico: A Cookbook.
  • Chef Reem Assil brings us Arabiyya, Recipes from the Life of an Arab in Diaspora, and we dig deep into salads with Jess Damuck, author of Salad Freak.

Timely Selections

Digital / Marketing tool from the BBC World Service

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these shareable videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and follow the link below to explore the library of videos!

VIEW VIDEOS HERE

Questions? Reach out to your Station Relations Representative.

Witness History: The Environment

Broadcast Window: April 1, 2022 – April 30, 2022

Length: One hour

A special hour-long edition of Witness History from the BBC World Service. Remarkable stories of the history of the environmental movement, told by the people who were there. Selected from the BBC’s Witness History program, we hear about the major moments that changed our understanding of the planet we live on. We’ll hear about the discovery of whale song – a book that kickstarted the movement against pesticides – and the story of a child climate activist who spoke with passion and anger, back in 1992.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.