APM Weekly March 4 – March 8, 2024

News

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

  • Kai checks back in with Wesley Morris, critic-at-large with the New York Times, about the state of the film industry ahead of the Academy Awards. This is part of our revisiting author and artist series that we kicked off in January.
  • Kai talks with Caroline O’Donovan, reporter at the Washington Post, about the emerging side-hustle of Amazon influencers.

Marketplace Morning Report

Monday March 4: Paramount recently said it won’t be returning to pre-strike spending levels on content as experiments during the strikes, like relying more on cheaper production abroad and non-scripted content, had proved an effective way to cut costs. The pressure to turn a profit in the competitive streaming world is intensifying. Marketplace Morning Report looks at how the last big strikes affected the media landscape in a durable way, with the rise of non-scripted TV, and what we might see carry through from these ones.

Marketplace Tech

Monday March 4: Marketplace’s Lily Jamali speaks with Boston University Professor Joan Donovan about misinformation issues with the 2024 election.

Decoding Democracy: New series beginning March 5 Generative artificial intelligence tools have made it much cheaper and easier to spread misinformation that can mislead voters and potentially influence elections. Companies that once invested heavily in correcting the record have shifted their priorities. Marketplace Tech, in collaboration with Washington Correspondent Kimberly Adams, will produce a video-first series looking at how disinformation and misinformation is occurring in the 2024 election campaign: how to spot it, how to fight it, and how to talk to family members and friends about it. The video trailer for this series is out now.

Tuesday March 5: Lily Jamali speaks with Marketplace’s Washington Correspondent Kimberly Adams about deepfakes in the 2024 election, kicking off “Marketplace Tech’s” new series all about mis-and-dis information called “Decoding Democracy.”

Thursday, March 7: Lily Jamali will sit down with SF Fed President and CEO Mary Daly for an interview focusing on the state of the economy in Silicon Valley, the SVB collapse anniversary, and AI driven tech layoffs.

On Point

  • Monday, March 4: Foreign diplomats are nervous that the United States’ once solid global leadership is on shaky ground. We hear from a panel of experienced diplomats why their home nations are alarmed at America’s partisan divides.
  • Wednesday, March 6: Meghna speaks with Michael J. Graetz about his new book, The Power to Destroy: How the Anti-tax Movement Hijacked America. In it, Graetz explores how what was once a fringe position fringe went mainstream and the consequences of that for US politics and its ability to address society’s problems.

The Splendid Table

March 8 – New episode

We’re looking at the world of restaurants and flavors this week with conversations with Andrew Friedman author of The Dish, The Lives and Labor Behind One Plate of Food and flavor scientist Arielle Johnson author of Flavorama: A Guide to Unlocking the Art and Science of Flavor.


Classical

Performance Today

  • Mar 4: Music by Mel Bonis, performed by musicians from ROCO, from the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston TX
  • Mar 5: Maureen Nelson and Michael Brown perform Claude Debussy’s Sonata for Violin and Piano in G minor from Music in the Vineyards Festival, Inglenook Winery, Rutherford, CA.
  • Mar 6: Inon Barnatan, Augustin Hadelich and Efe Baltacigil perform Maurice Ravel’s Piano Trio in A minor from the La Jolla Music Society in La Jolla, CA.
  • Mar 7: Christian Zacharias performs Haydn’s Piano Sonata in E-flat major from Spivey Hall at Clayton State University in Morrow, GA.
  • Mar 8: Aaron Boyd and Juho Pohjonen perform Clara Schuman’s Three Romances for Violin and Piano from Music@Menlo Chamber Music Festival and Institute in Menlo Park, CA.

Classical 24

Friday March 8: International Women’s Day: Female artists will be featured ALL DAY LONG. Nearly every selection is by a female composer, and the few that don’t will still feature a prominent female performer or conductor. 24 hours of delights and discoveries from an often-overlooked part of the classical repertoire .

New Classical Tracks with Julie Amacher
Wed 7:15am/5pm CT & Sat 9am CT

  • Julie Perry talks with Julie Amacher about the new album American Counterpoints.

Extra Ecclectic with Steve Seel
Wed 10pm-12am CT

  • Extra Eclectic kicks off Women’s History Month with works from well-known composers like Caroline Shaw and Jennifer Higdon, and lesser-known gems by Layale Chaker, Outi Tarkiainen, and Mary Kouyoudjian.

Euro Classic
Thurs 12am CT & Sat 8pm CT

  • Mar 7: Jennifer Higdon’s exciting and twangy Mandolin Concerto featuring Avi Avital in a concert from Frankfurt, Germany.
  • Mar 9: Alma Mahler, overshadowed in history by her illustrious husband, was a prodigious composer herself. We’ll hear her Three Early Songs with the RIAS Chamber Choir in a concert last fall in Berlin.

Saturday Cinema
Sat 10am – 12pm CT

  • An Oscar retrospective. A potpourri of the Oscar Winners for Best Score and Best Song from 1938-present.

Your Classical Discoveries
Sat 4-7pm CT

  • Music in Time: As most of the country prepares to “spring forward” this evening, we’ll explore music about clocks and the passage of time, including Haydn’s “Clock” Symphony, Robert Thurston’s “Time Travels,” and “The Flower Clock” by Jean Francaix.

APM Presents special of the week

Witness History: Women’s History Month

Air Window: March 1 – March 31, 2024

A special hour-long edition of Witness History from the BBC World Service. Remarkable stories of women’s history, told by the women who were there. Selected from the BBC’s Witness History program, we hear moving, inspiring and even outrageous stories about a few of the most important women in living memory.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

On Point Quarterly Newsletter – February 2024

Greetings,
At On Point we relish digging deeper into stories. It’s an opportunity that our format of one topic per hour uniquely offers in weekday programming. And that’s why I’m excited to start this newsletter with details about an upcoming series that is about digging deeper both figuratively and literally.

It’s inspired by the Biden administration’s push to tackle climate change by speeding up the transition away from fossil fuels to clean energy technologies. The Inflation Reduction Act, signed into law 18 months ago, boosted investment in the production of electric vehicles across the US. The Administration is also spending billions of dollars to boost domestic production of materials like lithium and nickel, essential components in the batteries that will power those EVs.

We are going to spend a week’s worth of shows telling the story of some of the minerals and elements essential to the production of those batteries and the motors that will power the clean energy future – where they come from, how we get them, how we use them, and of course the environmental and humanitarian challenges that come along with them.

Part One will tell the story of lithium. We’ll learn why the US has a quarter of the world’s lithium deposits but produces just 3% of the world’s supply, how all that could be about to change, and what that could mean for the community of Kings Mountain, North Carolina.

Part Two takes us to a copper mine in South Africa where we find out about the environmental devastation that mining has caused and what can be done to make mining less destructive.

In Part Three, we turn our attention to the Democratic Republic of Congo, which has more cobalt deposits than the rest of the word combined. Hundreds of thousands of people, including tens of thousands of children, work in these mines in what is effectively modern day slavery. We will hear first-hand from a mine-worker leading a grassroots movement to reform conditions.

Part Four takes us to Indonesia which now produces more than half of the world’s nickel and hopes to be the Saudi Arabia of the electric age, raising the living standards of tens of millions of its citizens. But can it escape China’s clutches?

The week wraps up by returning to the US to look at the challenges the US faces in boosting domestic mineral production and what it can do to break China’s dominance in the production of these battery-grade minerals.

We’re calling the series Elements of Energy: Mining for a Green Future. It will run the week of March 11, Monday through Friday. As you know these special series are a signature element of On Point’s programming and a demonstration of the editorial ambition we deliver for you and, most importantly, your listeners.

Before I sign off, as excited as I am to share our upcoming series plans with you, I can’t ignore the fact that this is 2024 and later this year there will be a hugely consequential election — one that may determine the future path of American democracy. Please know that we at On Point will waste no time horse-race tracking of who’s up or down each day. In our signature deep dive full-hour conversations On Point will explore the fragility of our democracy, the seen and unseen forces shaping that, and what is really at stake in this election. Expect to hear complexity and nuance.

More on that in my next newsletter. Thanks for reading this far!

Jonathan Dyer
Executive Producer, On Point

APM Weekly February 26 – March 1, 2024

News

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

  • Consumer Indexes: Kai talks with Prof. Sasha Indarte, UPenn, and Prof. Karthik Sastry, Princeton, about the difference between the consumer confidence and consumer sentiment indexes, their strengths, and weaknesses, and why we measure consumer feelings at all.
  • Restaurants and Credit Card Fees: There is a simmering conflict between the restaurant industry and the credit card industry. Restaurants say credit card fees have been rising and are becoming more confusing. Credit card fees are their third largest expense after food and labor, and the fees have doubled in the past 10 years, with more fee increases coming next year. They complain that Visa and Mastercard are operating a duopoly. Marketplace’s Sabri Ben Achour looks at the duopoly in credit cards generally, and the fight between these two industries as an example.
  • Feb 28: New York City Office Conversions: Marketplace’s Samantha Fields looks at what it actually takes – and costs – to turn offices into apartments. There’s a lot of talk these days about what to do with all the vacant office space around the country, and whether it could be turned into much-needed housing, especially in big city centers. New York City just announced that 46 buildings in the city have signed up so far to participate in its new “office conversion accelerator,” which is designed to help what can be a lengthy, cumbersome process move more quickly. Four projects are already underway that the city says will create more than 2,000 apartments. Marketplace’s Samantha Fields looks at one of these projects, takes a tour, and tries to get a sense of what it actually takes – and costs – to turn offices into apartments.

Marketplace Morning ReportNew Series: “Democracy in the Desert”

Several counties in Super Tuesday states have been defined by academic researchers as local news “deserts,” where residents have little to no coverage of what’s happening in their region – or how they might be affected by government policies. Voters need reliable local news to inform their decisions on election day: why have those local news business models failed, where are voters getting information now, and what are business models that can help solve this dilemma for democracy? “Marketplace Morning Report’s” David Brancaccio explores these questions in counties in South Texas, North Carolina, and Virginia.

  • Monday, February 26: They say all politics is local. So where’s the local news coverage this election year? David Brancaccio has been traveling to “news deserts” in Super Tuesday states to look at the business models that are failing or informing voters as they make their choices on Tuesday. Coverage begins in Val Verde County, Texas, where Mexico is just across the river.
  • Tuesday February 27: Yesterday we heard about the last daily newspaper in Val Verde county that folded more than 3 years ago. Who’s covering things now?
  • Wednesday February 28: North Carolina, where some experts say a news desert may have played a role in a Congressional election so fouled up, there was a do-over.
  • Thursday February 29: Voices from a news desert less than an hour’s drive from the center of American politics.
  • Friday March 1: Q &A: As we wrap up our weeklong coverage, a conversation with a man in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley who had to pull the plug on the local newspaper he published for years and now gets by printing campus newspapers.

Marketplace Tech

Tuesday Feb 27: Marketplace’s Lily Jamali speaks with Vox senior correspondent Rebecca Jennings about “trendbait” language on TikTok.

Thursday Feb 29: Lily Jamali speaks with Sarah Myers West, AI Now Institute, about the National AI Research Resource and what she sees as the dangers of private-public AI partnerships.

On Point

  • Monday, Feb 26: The Authoritarian Playbook for 2025 is a new report by the bipartisan group Protect Democracy. Using the former president’s own words, it outlines in details the “promises, powers, and plans” of Donald Trumps as he seeks to return to the White House. We speak with two of its authors.
  • Tuesday, Feb 27: Is “color blindness” the best way to achieve equality? Meghna speaks with Coleman Hughes about his provocative new book, in which he contends that race-conscious policy-making has only deepened divides in America.
  • Wednesday, Feb 28: Hot flashes. Sleep problems. Brain fog. More than one million women in the U.S. experience menopause each year. What’s happening in our brains during these hormonal changes?
  • Thursday, Feb 29: Last September, the U.S. Government Accountability Office published a damning report about the poor living conditions at military barracks — mold, broken windows, nonexistent HVAC systems and more. What has been done to fix those issues? Spoiler alert: very little. So what will it take to fix them?

The Splendid Table

March 1 – Repeat episode

This week we’re learning about tea with East Asian tea authority Theresa Wong of NYC’s T Shop. Theresa leads Francis through a tasting from black, thru oolong all the way to green. Then we talk about the surprising history of chai with food and culture writer Leena Trevedi- Grenier who also shares an uber personalized masala chai recipe.


Classical

Performance Today

  • Feb 26: Brandon Patrick’s George’s second album, “Twofold” is featured on PT
  • Feb 27: Yunchan Lim performs Ludwig van Beethoven’s Variations and Fugue in E-flat Major, op. 35 “Eroica” at the most recent Van Cliburn International Piano Competition
  • Feb 28: Gabriela Montero performs Frederic Chopin’s Polonaise – Fantaisie in A-flat Major from a recital in Lisbon
  • Feb 29: Featuring music by leap-year baby Giochino Rossini performed by Lawrence Brownlee and Martin Katz; The Knights, conducted by Eric Jacobsen and Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century conducted by Giancarlo Andretta
  • Mar 1: A performance of David Ludwig’s Concerto for Violin and Orchestra featuring Bella Hristova and the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by JoAnn Falletta

Classical 24

New Classical Tracks with Julie Amacher
Wed 7:15am/5pm CT & Sat 9am CT

  • Featuring new album BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL by the Eugene Concert Choir & Orchestra and EXIGENCE: A Sphinx Vocal Ensemble.

Extra Ecclectic with Steve Seel
Wed 10pm-12am CT

  • For the last episode of Black History Month, we’ll sample music by Julia perry, Derrick Skye, Wynton Marsalis, Errolyn Wallen, and Daniel Bernard Roumain.

Euro Classic
Thurs 12am CT & Sat 8pm CT

  • Feb 29: Our first 2024 concert has arrived! We’ll head to the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam to hear pianist Javier Perianes and the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra play Manuel de Falla’s “Nights in the Gardens of Spain.”
  • Mar 2: We kick of a full month of Euro Classics featuring female composers for Women’s History Month. Tonight we’ll hear the Concerto for String Orchestra by Polish composer Graznya Bacewicz in a concert from Riga, Latvia.

Saturday Cinema
Sat 10am – 12pm CT

  • Join Lynne as she starts the countdown to the Oscars on March 10th.

Your Classical Discoveries
Sat 4-7pm CT

  • Large Czechs: As we celebrate the 200th birthday of Bedrich Smetana, we’ll hear his complete Ma Vlast (My Fatherland): 4 pm hour: Vyserhad and The Moldau; 5 pm hour: Sarka and From Bohemia’s Forests and Fields; 6 pm hour: Tabor and Blanik. Also, plenty of other Czech composers from the baroque to the 20th century, featuring some names you may not know!

200th birthday of Bedrich Smetana: On Saturday March 2, each shift will feature a selection by Smetana, including a complete survey of his most famous work, Ma Vlast (My Fatherland), during YourClassical Discoveries.


APM Presents special of the week

AeroEspacial: Latino People and Stories at the Heart of Aerospace

Air Window: now – April 30, 2024

This special program explores the history, and future, of Latino influence and representation in aviation and space exploration. Based on “AeroEspacial,” a limited series from the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, this show spotlights Latino voices and introduces listeners to the diversity of people working in and around aerospace across the United States. We hear from scientists, scholars, historians, and artists..

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

2024 BBC Spring Interim and Summer Schedules Now Available

Schedule Changes Coming Soon

Given the differences in daylight saving time between the US and the UK, the BBC World Service will be on a three-week interim schedule prior to the 2024 summer schedule. Please watch ContentDepot for additional reminders.

The 2024 spring interim schedule is effective Sunday, March 10, 2024 through Saturday, March 30, 2024.

Spring Interim Schedule Highlights

  • Newshour
    • Weekday editions remain the same with an extra edition at 5pm ET
    • Weekend 8am ET editions shift one hour to 9am ET. This change impacts scheduling on March 10, March 16 – 17, March 23 – 24, and March 30.
    • Weekend 4pm ET editions remain consistent during the interim schedule, with an extra edition at 5pm ET.
  • BBC OS
    • Editions move forward one hour to 12 PM ET and 1 PM ET
  • The Newsroom
    • There will be no 2 PM ET edition Sunday – Friday

The 2024 summer schedule is effective Sunday, March 31, 2024 through Saturday, October 26, 2024.

Summer Schedule Highlights

  • Core news programs (Newshour, Newsday, BBC OS) remain consistent with previous (non-interim) schedules.
  • The Newsroom
    • The Monday – Sunday edition returns to 6 pm ET for the summer as usual.
  • Other Programs
    • Two new programs join the schedule, The Global Story (Mon – Fri 6:30 a.m. ET) and The Media Show (Thursday 3 a.m. and 7 p.m. ET)
    • Outlook Weekend and The Real Story will be sunset.
    • Outlook will add a Friday edition so it will now broadcast Monday – Friday.
    • Unexpected Elements moves from Thursday to Friday.
    • The Documentary (Tue) moves later in the week and becomes The Documentary (Thu), with Assignment moving to take the Tuesday slot.

Find these schedules on our website. Please review them carefully and contact your Station Representative with any questions.

APM Weekly February 12 – 16, 2024

News

BBC World of Secrets

Episode Six: Man of God
Wednesday February 14

The secret daughter of TB Joshua, who dared to rebel against her “prophet” father. Ajoke was born to a different mother than her sisters, and disciples have told us how she fought back against him. Two years ago, we tracked her down but we weren’t able to use the recording – until now. She tells us her story.

**This episode contains descriptions and references to suicide, physical and sexual violence, including sexual assault, rape and the language associated with it.**

Broadcast times: Wed 06:32-07:00, Wed 18:32-19:00, Fri 21:32-22:00, Sat 04:32-05:00, Sat 12:32-13:00 EST

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

Kai talks to Adam Posen, president of the Peterson Institute for International Economics, about the headwinds facing China’s economy.

It’s been nearly four years since we went into pandemic lockdowns, which means it’s been four years since people tried to buy their way through incredible lifestyle shifts. Some of those big-ticket purchases have come with regrets. Used home gym equipment has flooded the market at dirt cheap prices. There are pizza ovens and outdoor heaters for everyone’s outdoor gatherings. And some people who fled cities now regret the big lifestyle change they made to buy a home. Now with mortgage rates the way they are, they’re stuck. Marketplace’s Kristin Schwab looks at the stuff, big or small, that people regret buying long ago

Marketplace Morning Report

The New York Federal Reserve just reported that 70% of all household debt is mortgage debt. Credit card debt is 6%. Next week the Marketplace Morning Report looks at the economic benefits of cheap mortgage debt right now — if it’s a big concern, and how it might actually be a stimulus for the economy right now.

Marketplace Tech

Monday Feb 12: Marketplace’s Lily Jamali speaks with Tamir Kalifa, photojournalist about the role social media plays in the Uvalde, Texas community in the wake of the Robb Elementary shooting.

Tuesday Feb 13: Lily Jamali speaks with Rolfe Winkler, WSJ, about their recent reporting about how 23andMe is struggling to be profitable.

On Point

  • Monday, Feb 12: We’ve all seen the annoying pop-ups that show up every time we’re online. Now, Google is planning to phase out those third-party cookies on its Chrome browser by the end of the year. We explore how that’s frustrating advertisers and helping Google grow its ad monopoly power.
  • Tuesday, Feb 13: Hospitals are required by law to post their prices online, but only about 36 percent of hospitals are fully complying. When hospitals hide prices, it enables them to charge different prices to different people. We hear why Congress and now even employers are saying, no more.
  • Friday, Feb 16: What happens when you’re charged with being a witch? There was the 17th century trial of an indigenous Sámi woman accused of murder on Vardø island, Norway, in the 1620s. And the case against a young religious zealot named Marie-Catherine Cadière in 18th century France. We’ll explore some lesser-known witch trials with Marion Gibson, professor of Renaissance and magical literature and author of “Witchcraft: A History in Thirteen Trials.” What can these accused women’s stories tell us about fear, conspiracy, gender and power — even today?

The Splendid Table

February 16 – Repeat episode

This week it’s a conversation about how to ramp up your home cooking with award-winning chef Gavin Kaysen author of At Home.


Classical

Performance Today

  • Feb 12: Lara Downes performs a brand new arrangement of Rhapsody in Blue with San Francisco Conservatory of Music Orchestra
  • Feb 13: Nashville Symphony-Giancarlo Guerrero conducts The Nashville Symphony in a performance of Ravel’s Mother Goose Suite, from Schermerhorn Symphony Center in Nashville, TN
  • Feb 14: A special Valentine’s Day version of the piano puzzler- with our first ever video to accompany it. Also, violinist Hannah White of Sphinx Virtuosi performs “Between Worlds” by Carlos Simon, from a concert at the Brooks Center for the Performing Arts at Clemson University in Clemson, SC
  • Feb 15: James Ehnes performs Erich Korngold’s Concerto for Violin and Orchestra with the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by JoAnn Falletta at the Kleinhans Music Hall in Buffalo, NY
  • Feb 16: Pianist Stewart Goodyear performs Hummel’s Piano Quintet in E-flat minor with an all-star string quartet at Festival Mozaic in San Luis Obispo, CA

Classical 24

New Classical Tracks with Julie Amacher
Wed 7:15am/5pm CT & Sat 9am CT

  • Osmo Vänskä talks with Julie Amacher about his new album with the Minnesota Orchestra called Mahler Symphony No. 8.

Extra Ecclectic with Steve Seel
Wed 10pm-12am CT

  • More music for Black History Month from Valerie Capers, Lara Downes, and more…. plus music both in the spirit of AND completely antithetical to Valentine’s Day, including Peteris Vasks’s “Voice of Love,” Missy Mazzoli’s “Heartbreaker,” and David Lang’s “love fail.”

Euro Classic
Thurs 12am CT & Sat 8pm CT

  • Feb 15: It’s off to the Baltic Sea to hear Miecyzslaw Karlowicz’s “Lithuanian Rhapsody” played by the Warsaw Philharmonic.
  • Feb 17: For those waiting until the weekend for their Valentine’s Day activities, we’ll hear Scriabin’s “The Poem of Ecstasy” in concert from December 2023 in beautiful Torino, Italy.

Rhapsody in Black
Thurs 9pm CT & Sun 4pm CT

  • Where we turn up the voices of Black artists in the world of classical music. This week focuses on Scotland-based American conductor Kellen Gray.

Your Classical Discoveries
Sat 4-7pm CT

  • Variations on variations: Composers have been writing variations on themes for centuries, and we’ll hear all sorts of familiar and unfamiliar examples, including Tchaikovsky’s Rococo Variations, Rachmaninoff’s Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, and Margaret Bonds’s Montgomery Variations.

Celebrating 100 years of George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue:
Monday February 12 is the 100th anniversary of the premiere of George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue. C24 will celebrate this anniversary all week long. All times listed below are CT.

February 12

  • Each C24 host will have a recording of Rhapsody in their shift
  • 5 am: Simone Dinnerstein
  • 8 am: Paul Whiteman Orchestra/Gershwin at piano (mono recording)
  • 12 pm: Benjamin Grosvenor
  • 5 pm: Leonard Bernstein
  • 10 pm: Wayne Marshall (original jazz band arrangement)

February 13

  • 9 am: Gershwin’s Second Rhapsody
  • 6 pm: Lara Downes Rhapsody Reimagined*

February 14

  • 8 am: ‘I Got Rhythm’ Variations
  • Plus Gershwin love songs throughout the day for Valentine’s Day

February 15

  • 9 am: Ravel Concerto in G
  • 12 pm: Ireland Piano Concerto 
  • 6 pm: Ravel Concerto for the Left Hand
  • 8 pm: Bernstein “The Age of Anxiety”

February 16

  • 9 am: Gershwin Concerto in F

APM Presents special of the week

Take Me to the Water

Air Window: February 12 – March 31, 2024

A one-hour special, hosted by Vernon Neal, focusing on harpist Ashley Jackson’s program Take Me to the Water recorded at American Public Medias studios. Take Me to the Water, is an immersive audio experience that touches on themes from African mythology, the antebellum spiritual tradition and water’s transportive, transmogrifying nature

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

APM Weekly February 5 – February 9, 2024

News

BBC World of Secrets

Episode Five: Collapse
Wednesday February 7

People are trapped under rubble in the Lagos church compound. The eyes of the world are now on TB Joshua. Beneath the collapsed building is 23-year-old Princess, from South Africa. Her mother says she’s told: “just pray”. Disciple Emmanuel goes to the scene. “You could hear people, and their voices are fading. From louder, it’s getting weaker.” As suspicion about the cause of the collapse intensifies, Nigeria’s president, Goodluck Jonathan, flies in to offer his condolences to TB Joshua and the bereaved families. Meanwhile, the “prophet” gives a bizarre explanation. Presenters Charlie Northcott and Yemisi Adegoke investigate the cult of TB Joshua, a story of miracles, manipulation and abuse.

Broadcast times: Wed 06:32-07:00, Wed 18:32-19:00, Fri 21:32-22:00, Sat 04:32-05:00, Sat 12:32-13:00 EST

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

Kai talks with Ben Zhao, a computer science professor at University of Chicago and leader of the Nightshade and Glaze projects which help artists alter their art to protect them from data scraping.

Thursday, February 8: Episode two of our ongoing series – Breaking Ground—about federal investment in the economy – Kai has the story of one street in one neighborhood in one city…..the story of a $23.9 million grant from the Department of Transportation in East Las Vegas. Note that there will be no numbers segment in this episode.

Marketplace Tech

Monday Feb 5: Marketplace’s Lily Jamali speaks with Lance Ulanoff, TechRadar, about the Apple Vision Pro and the headsets that have tried and failed before it.

Thursday Feb 6: Lily Jamali speaks with Meredith Broussard, NYU Data Journalism Professor, about AI mammogram integration

On Point

  • Monday, Feb 5: Should Donald Trump be disqualified from the presidency? This week, the justices hear a blockbuster case that could profoundly shape not only the 2024 election, but American democracy, too.
  • Wednesday, Feb 7: The US is reported to have approved plans for a series of strikes on Iranian targets in Syria and Iraq. This follows an attack by Iranian backed militia on its base in Jordan that killed three troops and injured dozens of others. How should the US respond militarily and what else can it do to contain Iran’s seeming determination to provoke the US into a wider war?
  • Friday, Feb 9: The Northeast has lost a month of annual snow cover since 2000. Ski resorts in the Northwest are shifting their focus toward mountain biking. 17th-century Dutch masterpieces–depicting winter merrymaking on frozen canals–appear almost laughable today. In many places, snow and ice are functionally gone. Forever. What does this mean for the culture and economies of once-cold places?

The Splendid Table

February 9 – New episode

This week we talk to the NYT’s award – winning columnist Melissa Clark about her deep dive into the world of salt and she takes your cooking questions with Francis. Then we introduce you to Kentucky’s former poet laureate and award- winning author Crystal Wilkinson about her new memoir, Praise Song for the Kitchen Ghosts, Stories and Recipes from Five Generations of Black Country Cooks.


Classical

Performance Today

  • Feb 5: Inna Faliks performs a solo work for piano by Billy Childs
  • Feb 6: Todd Palmer and Ayane Kozasa perform music by Rebecca Clarke at the Spoleto Festival in Charleston, SC
  • Feb 7: Johannes Debus conducts ROCO in a performance of Clarice Assad’s “Ode to Carmen Miranda”
  • Feb 8: Anna Geniushene performs Brahms at the most recent Van Cliburn International Piano Competition
  • Feb 9: PT celebrates Lunar New Year and Fred talks with Hilary Hahn about her Ysaye Sonatas release

Classical 24

New Classical Tracks with Julie Amacher
Wed 7:15am/5pm CT & Sat 9am CT

  • Lara Downes talks with Julie Amacher about her new album Gershwin Reimagined just in time to celebrate Rhapsody in Blue’s 100th anniversary on Feb 12th.

Extra Ecclectic with Steve Seel
Wed 10pm-12am CT

  • Extra Eclectic’s first episode of Black History Month features composers like Michael Abels, Julius Eastman, Carlos Simon, deVon Russell Gray, and Julia Perry.

Euro Classic
Thurs 12am CT & Sat 8pm CT

  • Feb 8: We head to last fall’s Bratislava Music Festival to hear the rarely-heard Violin Concerto by Jan Zimmer, with violinist Milan Pal’a and the Slovak Sinfonietta
  • Feb 11: Hannah Kendall’s “The Spark Catchers” was written in 2017, inspired by a poem about women who worked in match factories in the 1800s. We’ll hear it in a concert from December in Bangor, Wales, from the BBC National Symphony Orchestra of Wales.

Rhapsody in Black
Thurs 9pm CT & Sun 4pm CT

  • Where we turn up the voices of Black artists in the world of classical music. This week focuses on when Dr. Martin Luther King met Maestro Paul Freeman.

Saturday Cinema
Sat 10am – 12pm CT

  • In celebration of Valentine’s Day Saturday Cinema will feature the great love themes from the movies.

Your Classical Discoveries
Sat 4-7pm CT

  • LUNAR NEW YEAR: Join Mindy Ratner for a celebration of Lunar New Year, featuring music by Chinese composers, musical evocations of the moon, and tunes for good luck and good fortune.

APM Presents special of the week

Beyond ‘Reality’ TV: Inside the Lives of Older Singles

Air Window: now – March 31, 2024

ABC’s “The Golden Bachelor” brought long-overdue attention to the dating lives of older singles. But how much of the reality TV show actually rang true? In this special, Dating While Gray host Laura Stassi sifts through research and talks to older singles about our dating lives, including tools and strategies to make love connections, ways we’re incorporating – and discarding – traditional arrangements for marriage and living together 24/7, and how we’re navigating new romance around already established family commitments.

APM Weekly January 29 – February 2, 2024

News

BBC World of Secrets

Episode Four: The Maze
Wednesday January 31

Anneka confronts TB Joshua. What really happened in his fifth-floor apartment at the top of the Lagos church compound? After she flees, TB Joshua sends one of his most trusted disciples to bring her back. “I knew she’d been sent to take me,” Anneka says. Meanwhile, behind the miracles is a secret machine run by TB Joshua’s most trusted disciples, and some of them are turning whistleblowers. Presenters Charlie Northcott and Yemisi Adegoke investigate the cult of TB Joshua, a story of miracles, manipulation and abuse.

**This episode contains descriptions and references to sexual and physical violence, including sexual assault, rape and forced abortions, and the language associated with it.**

Broadcast times: Wed 06:32-07:00, Wed 18:32-19:00, Fri 21:32-22:00, Sat 04:32-05:00, Sat 12:32-13:00 EST

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

Kai speaks with Aallyah Wright, reporter for Capital B News, about how internet access is restricted from Black Southerners, and how a federal program aimed to solve this issue is running out of funds.

Marketplace Tech

Monday Jan 29: Marketplace’s Lily Jamali speaks with Catherine McKenna, CEO of Climate and Nature Solutions and former Canadian climate change minister, about carbon capture issues.

Wednesday Jan 31: Lily Jamali speaks with Reuters journalist Ernest Scheyder about his new book called “THE WAR BELOW: Lithium, Copper, and the Global Battle to Power Our Lives.” And the reckoning brought on by the hunt for minerals, which are considered vital to a fossil-fuel future.

Thursday Feb 1: Lily Jamali speaks with Mihika Agarwal, culture journalist, about technology designed to optimize grief.

On Point

  • Monday, Jan 29: Florida is putting together a new program that aims to lower prescription drug prices by importing drugs from Canada. We hear why some are looking abroad to lower prescription drug costs at home.
  • Tuesday, Jan 30: Many of us learned how to do our jobs and connect with colleagues at our first workplace. But after the pandemic normalized remote work, are entry-level office workers today missing out on that professional coming-of-age experience?
  • Wednesday, Jan 31: In Eagle Pass,Texas,the Texas National Guard has taken over a 47-acre park in the town in order to arrest incoming migrants. Technically speaking, immigration law is the purview of the federal government, but the state has “banned” Border Patrol agents from even entering the park. We explore what this standoff means for the local community, immigration policy, and federal jurisdiction in a border crisis.
  • Thursday, Feb 1: The COVID-19 pandemic led to a surge in chronic absenteeism among school students and new federal data indicates that it still persists, with ten percent of students routinely not showing up to school. We examine the consequences of that and what can and is being done to address it.

The Splendid Table

February 2 – Repeat episode

We are diving into the local food scene in Hawai‘i with a show we recorded with Hawai‘i Public Radio. Guests include chef Sheldon Simeon of Tin Roof Maui , chef Robynne Mai‘i of Fête, Emma Bello of Sweet Land Farm, Christopher Kanemura of Fujiya Hawai‘i, chef Ed Kenney of public television’s Family Ingredients, Jayna Omaye, Hawai‘i Public Radio’s culture and arts reporter and Kevin Yim, VP of Marketing & Communications for Zippy’s Restaurants.


Classical

Performance Today

  • Jan 29: ROCO performs work by Richard Danielpour from the Asia Society Texas Center in Houston TX
  • Jan 30: Imani Winds performs work by Nathalie Joachim from the Alberta Rose Theatre, Portland, OR
  • Jan 31: Johannes Moser and Marc-Andre Hamelin perform work by Nadia Boulanger from Spivey Hall at Clayton State University in Morrow, GA
  • Feb 1: Sarah Willis performs Jose White Lafitte’s composition La Bella Cubano with the Havana Lyceum Orchestra, conducted by Jose Mendez Padron from the Rheingau Music Festival, in Wiesbaden, Germany
  • Feb 2: Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Jaime Martin performs Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 4 at Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles, CA

APM Presents special of the week

Blue Centennial from YourClassical: Celebrating a Century of Gershwin’s Rhapsody

Air Window: February 5 – February 29, 2024

Exploring Gershwin’s jazz-age showstopper with interviews and performances by the artists who’ve brought it to life over the last 100 years.

A Word from The Daily – January 2024

Dear Colleagues,

Happy New Year! We hope you had a wonderful wrap-up to 2023 and enjoyed time with friends and family. As we’re settling into 2024, we wanted to give you a rundown of what we’ve been up to these past few months.

Covering The War in Gaza

After the Hamas attack on October 7th and the subsequent war that followed, “The Daily” has dedicated much of its coverage to not only the tragic events, but the voices behind the conflict. In an October episode titled ‘Voices from Gaza’, host Sabrina Tavernise speaks with Abdallah Hasaneen, a young man in southern Gaza, and Wafa Elsaka, a Palestinian-American who was visiting her mother-in-law in Gaza City during the start of the war. Both separately share their stories and describe the dark realities of daily life during a war.

In ‘Hamas Took Her Son’, Tavernise interviews Rachel Goldberg, a mother in Jerusalem, whose son was taken hostage by Hamas. Goldberg takes us through the events that transpired while her son was at the musical festival in the Negev desert and describes the horror and uncertainty she faces while waiting for his release.

Other noteworthy episodes centered around these stories include Golan’s StoryThe Doctors of Gaza and A Reporter’s Journey Into Gaza.A Successful Year for “The Daily”

2023 was another year of growth for our program on public radio – with increased carriage on stations. The year saw steady growth, and we ended the year with 305 broadcast partners whom we look forward to serving and working with.

Covering the 2024 Election

With the presidential election already under way, so is our coverage. We’ve spent the last several months setting our feet to cover the dual storylines of the race: the campaign itself, and former President Trump in criminal court. We plan to bring our radio listeners the reporting and expertise of the veteran New York Times reporters, including Maggie Haberman, Mike Schmidt, Jonathan Swan, Reid Epstein, Jennifer Medina, Maya King, Shane Goldmacher, Nate Cohn, and many, many others.

In the coming months, we will mark the big news moments and tackle larger thematic stepback questions: how the electorate is changing, voters’ faith in our democracy, the threat of political violence, economic inequity, among others. In February and March, stations can expect us to feature the reporting of Maggie Haberman, Jonathan Swan and Charlie Savage, who have been reporting for months on what a second Trump Administration might look like.

Until next time,

-The Daily Team

BBC Monthly – February 2024

Coming in February 2024

Doc picks

The full list of available BBC documentaries can be found here. Look for these specials and their promos on Content Depot.  

We recommend combining this month’s picks to form an hour about climate change.  

World Book Café – Madrid
February 10 – March 8
One hour

World Book Café heads to Madrid to talk to writers about a new boom in feminist fiction.

World Questions: Poland
February 10 – March 8
One hour

After eight years of right-wing rule in Poland, a new government has taken power. But are the new government’s robust actions strengthening the law or undermining it? With February marking two years since the start of a war in Ukraine that has affected Poland so deeply, there is much to debate.

World Wide Waves ‘24
February 17 – March 15
One hour

Radio is a perfect medium for women: intimate, direct and, if need be, anonymous. For World Radio Day, we hear from community radio stations around the world that put female voices first: from Afghanistan, the Palestinian territories, the Ecuadorian Amazon, and among migrant farmworkers in the US.

APM Weekly January 22 – 26, 2024

News

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

The first episode of Marketplace’s federal spending series, “Breaking Ground,” will air Wednesday, January 24, looking at the history of the New Deal and its impact today.

The American economy is having a moment: the most significant influx of government investment in decades. Historically, investments of this magnitude — think the New Deal and the War on Poverty — reimagined and reshaped the way Americans interacted with this economy and the federal government. Is this one of those inflection points?

Congress and the Biden Administration have authorized more than a trillion dollars of spending with the Inflation Reduction Act, Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, and CHIPS Act — and the money is starting to go out in complicated, often invisible ways.

Beginning mid-January, Marketplace’s Kai Ryssdal will follow this money into neighborhoods, towns, cities, and companies to explore whether this investment will change the way we live, work, and interact with each other — revealing the complex, slow nature of this spending, the relationships between government and companies, and the uncertainty over how these projects will ultimately pan out.

The series, which will consist of six to eight parts depending on where our reporting leads us, is anticipated to run through the first half of the calendar year and will include field reporting and conversations within communities from across the country.

The series is currently slated to include the history of the New Deal and its impact today; an infrastructure project in east Las Vegas; the support for and impact of sustainable aviation fuel; IRA spending in a Tribal community in Minnesota; a planned TSMC chip plant in Phoenix; the lobbying industrial complex; and more. Since reporting is still in progress, all topics are subject to change.

Marketplace Morning Report

Now that the big banks have reported quarterly results, we’re about to get a wave of earnings reports from smaller, regional banks. Those banks’ balance sheets were thrust into the spotlight last August when Moody’s downgraded several of their credit ratings. Marketplace Morning Report looks at whether regional banks are still struggling, and what ongoing problems they still face.

Marketplace Tech

Monday Jan 22: Marketplace’s Lily Jamali speaks with Joel Khalili at Wired about bitcoin ETFs and how “bitcoin purists” feel about them.

Tuesday Jan 23: Lily speaks with David Kroodsma, director of research and innovation at Global Fishing Watch, about their recent research into AI use in mapping human activity across the oceans.

On Point

  • Monday, Jan 22: Polls show Donald Trump dominating the race for the Republican presidential nomination. What is it that Republican Party elites don’t understand about Trump’s most passionate Republican voters and what that means for the Republican Party.
  • Wednesday, Jan 24: Over the past 25 years forty million Americans have stopped attending church. Jim Davis, a pastor at an evangelical church in Orlando, and Michael Graham, a writer with the Gospel Coalition, tell us that the problem isn’t that churches are asking too much of their congregants, it’s that they’re not asking enough. Davis and Graham are the authors of The Great Dechurching: Who’s Leaving, Why Are They Going, and What Will It Take to Bring Them Back?
  • Friday, Jan 26: According to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the average American is shorter than they were just a couple of decades ago. And in global rankings we’re sliding down the height charts. We explore what’s causing that, and why it might not necessarily be a bad thing.

The Splendid Table

January 26 – New episode

We’re all about soups and stews this week. We’re talking Hot Pot with Jing Gao, author of The Book of Sichuan Chili Crisp, Colombia’s Sancocho with Mariana Velásquez, author of Colombiana: A Rediscovery of Recipes and Rituals from the Soul of Colombia.


Classical

Performance Today

  • Jan 22: Jon Kimura Parker performs Florence Price’s Piano Quintet in E minor with an all-star group at the Geneva Music Festival in Geneva, NY
  • Jan 23: Eunice Kim and Xavier Foley perform Foley’s composition “For Justice and Peace” with the Williamsburg Symphony Orchestra in Williamsburg, VA
  • Jan 24: James Ehnes, Paul Watkins and Alessio Bax perform Johannes Brahms’ Trio for Violin, Cello and Piano in C minor at Benaroya Hall in Seattle, WA
  • Jan 25: St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Stephan Deneve, performs the John Adams composition “Short Ride in a Fast Machine” at Powell Hall in St. Louis, MO
  • Jan 26: A world premiere performance by the orchestra A Far Cry from the Rockport Chamber Music Festival , CA

Classical 24

Saturday, Jan. 27th is International Holocaust Remembrance Day

We will feature music for the day in each host’s shift:

  • 2 am hour CT: Sandor Kuti – Serenade No. 3
  • 6 am hour CT: Pavel Haas – Wind Quintet
  • 12 pm hour CT: Viktor Ullman – Concerto for Orchestra
  • 3 pm hour CT: Richard Danielpour – Kaddish
  • 7 pm hour CT: Marcel Tyberg – Symphony No. 3
  • 8 pm hour CT: Hans Krasa – Overture for Small Orchestra
  • 10 pm hour CT: Gideon Klein – Partita for Strings

New Classical Tracks with Julie Amacher
Wed 7:15am/5pm CT & Sat 9am CT

  • Weiss Kaplan Stumpf Trio with Beethoven: The Complete Piano Trios

Extra Ecclectic with Steve Seel
Wed 10pm-12am CT

  • Is it real or in your mind? Explore the blurred lines between imagination and reality with Paul Matthusen’s “of memory and minutae,” Sofia Gubaidulina’s “Fairytale Poem,” Nico Muhly’s “Seeing is Believing,” and more.

Euro Classic
Thurs 12am CT & Sat 8pm CT

  • Jan 25: Violist Tabea Zimmermann tackles one of the 20th century’s most famous works for the instrument: William Walton’s Viola Concerto, in a concert from Berlin last December.
  • Jan 27: Celebrate Mozart’s birthday with violinist Alina Ibragimova and the Basel Chamber Orchestra playing the ‘Turkish’ Violin Concerto No. 5, from a November concert at Wigmore Hall in London.

Rhapsody in Black
Thurs 9pm CT & Sun 4pm CT

  • Where we turn up the voices of Black artists in the world of classical music. This week focuses on Ahmed Alabaca, a Black Composer, Arranger, Conductor and Song-Writer/Pianist.

Saturday Cinema
Sat 10am – 12pm CT

  • It is all about Listener Requests on this upcoming episode of Saturday Cinema.

Your Classical Discoveries
Sat 4-7pm CT

  • A Mozart Birthday Bash: celebrate Mozart with some of his lesser-known works, alongside composers who were inspired by him, like Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, Liszt, Arvo Part, and more.

APM Presents special of the week

Community Science Unifies Us Around Climate Change

Air Window: January 19 – April 30, 2024

Climate change can feel apocalyptic and unsolvable. Yet, communities across the U.S. are finding ways to adapt and build resilience to its impacts. Higher Ground tells the stories of people engaging in community science to take control and find understanding in changes to their environment. Empowered with information, these communities are able to keep cool heads in the face of global warming. Hope and progress in the eye of the storm.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.