On Point Quarterly Newsletter May/June 2024

Greetings,

My (not exactly) quarterly newsletter from the On Point EP’s desk is dropping into your inbox a little later than intended because I have been waiting for the ink to dry on a really exciting new editorial partnership that I want to share with you. More on that in a moment.

Before that, more exciting news to share with you. First we were delighted to learn that in the latest Nielson audience survey (Fall 2023), On Point’s total national audience (cume) went up by a whopping 49% to more than 2.1 million weekly listeners. That audience growth is primarily driven by carriage, meaning that more stations are choosing to add On Point to their schedules. On Point is now on more stations than ever in the show’s history and that involves choices you have made. We know such decisions are not taken lightly — Meghna, me and all of us at On Point are hugely grateful for the trust you have taken in On Point to deliver compelling stories and conversations for your audience.

And so it’s doubly gratifying that the kind of editorial choices we make at On Point, the kind that we think make us distinct, have again been recognised by the RTDNA. If you haven’t heard already, On Point is the 2024 recipient of a Regional Murrow award for best news documentary. In the winning episode of On Point“The border crisis arrives in Chicago,” we brought national attention to how the border crisis has been impacting historically blue Chicago, as the city planned to house and care for migrants being bused from the border in historically Black neighborhoods. The episode demonstrated, with passionate but informed voices, how the so-called crisis at the southern border is impacting communities far away and pitting neighbor against neighbor.

It is the fourth straight year that On Point has won a Murrow award in the best news documentary category. That would be a huge achievement for any show, let alone one that goes to air five days a week as a daily, live show. I think it speaks to the value of On Point, with its premium on depth and understanding of complex stories, especially when they involve a breakdown in public trust.

And maybe that is something the folks at the investigative journalism website ProPublica recognized when they reached out to us to ask if we would consider producing some episodes of On Point shaped by their original journalism. We were intrigued by the shared idea of crafting jointly produced editions of On Point that could go beyond just interviewing their reporters. After a little deliberation about what that might look like and what it would take, of course we said yes. This is the editorial partnership — which will run until the end of the year — that I have been itching to tell you about. We have hired a full-time dedicated producer, Katelyn Harrop, who will work to craft these new special episodes of On Point. Katelyn started just this week and I think it’s fair to say that she, On Point and ProPublica are enthusiastic for the potential of this partnership to deliver truly outstanding journalism for your listeners

One other thing I should mention before I sign off – and with summer vacations right around the corner! We heard from many enthusiastic listeners last year about how much they enjoyed and appreciated our Week of Wonder in which we let awe inspire us. It was the perfect summer break listening people were hungry for…so we’re doing it again. We’re working now to bring you a week of shows dedicated to exploring what captivates our mind, illuminates our humanity and both delights and confounds us. It might just be the break we all need, whether or not we are actually on vacation. Listen out for that starting July 22.

And I hope that’s not the only break you get this summer.

Best wishes from all of us at On Point,Jonathan Dyer
Executive Producer, On Point

BBC Monthly – Coming in July 2024

BBC Wimbledon Update
The Wimbledon tennis tournament kicks off on Monday July 1. The BBC has a five-minute short available daily throughout the tournament that can be delivered to stations via email or download from the Media Partners Centre.

If you are interested in carrying this module, please contact your Station Rep by June 28 and they can get the files to you. **You must sign up ahead of time in order to gain access to the files**.

Broadcast Details:
Available daily Monday 1st July to Sunday 14th July.
Duration: 5 minutes
Broadcast window: daily from 20:00 GMT until 11:00 GMT the following day

Wimbledon is the oldest tennis tournament in the world and widely considered the most prestigious. It has been held at the All England Club in Wimbledon, south-west London since 1877. It is the only one of the four Grand Slam events to be played on grass. In BBC Wimbledon Update Delyth Lloyd and Lee James will present a daily five minute round-up of all the action.


July Documentaries

The full list of available BBC documentaries can be found here. Look for these specials and their promos on Content Depot.  

World Book Club: Kevin Kwan
July 6 – August 9, 2024
One hour

Kevin Kwan discusses his internationally best-selling novel, Crazy Rich Asians, with readers from around the world. Chinese-American academic Rachel Chu lives a modest and happy life with her boyfriend and fellow academic Nick. But when Nick invites her home to Singapore to meet the family, everything changes – starting with the first class flights. Saturated with wildly wealthy and deliciously dysfunctional super-elites, this ironic and funny rom-com makes a perfect escapist summer read.

The Evidence: Salt
July 20 – August 16, 2024
One hour

For eons, salt has been crucial to human health, culture, and diet. On this episode of The Evidence, we explore the strange science of salt taste – why it can be sweet, salty, or even a flavour enhancer. We look at how salt keeps our bodies running, and what happens if we have too little of it. And while too little salt may be bad, too much is also a problem. What does the science say about how much salt is optimal, and what can we do to make sure we’re eating the right amount? Claudia Hammond is joined by a panel of salty experts who will help find the answers to these questions and more.

The Forum: History of mountaineering
July 27 – August 23, 2024
One hour

Humans have always co-existed with mountains, as ancient remains found in glaciers prove. But our interest in them may have been more spiritual or religiously motivated, rather than as a place to go to improve our health and wellbeing. In some cultures today mountains are still considered to be the home of deities. So when did mountaineering become a popular pastime and how did the obsession with bagging summits start? Iszi Lawrence investigates our evolving relationship with the planet’s highest peaks.

APM Weekly June 24 – 28, 2024

BBC

BBC Wimbledon Update

The Wimbledon tennis tournament kicks off on Monday July 1. The BBC has a five-minute short available daily throughout the tournament that can be delivered to stations via email or download from the Media Partners Centre.

If you are interested in carrying this module, please contact your Station Rep by June 28 and they can get the files to you. **You must sign up ahead of time in order to gain access to the files**.

Broadcast Details:
Available daily Monday 1st July to Sunday 14th July.
Duration: 5 minutes
Broadcast window: daily from 20:00 GMT until 11:00 GMT the following day

Wimbledon is the oldest tennis tournament in the world and widely considered the most prestigious. It has been held at the All England Club in Wimbledon, south-west London since 1877. It is the only one of the four Grand Slam events to be played on grass. In BBC Wimbledon Update Delyth Lloyd and Lee James will present a daily five minute round-up of all the action.

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

  • Our next installment of Breaking Ground goes to Minnesota–The Inflation Reduction Act reserves $722 million for Tribal and Indigenous communities, including specific programs to grow renewable energy on Tribal lands. Kai visits Red Lake Nation in northern Minnesota with a profile of Minnesota’s only Native-owned solar installation company.
  • Kai talks to Sam Wallace, owner of From Field and Flower, a honey stall in London’s Borough Market, about how business has been of late.

Marketplace Morning Report

Marketplace Morning Report hots David Brancaccio speaks with Emily Nussbaum, staff writer at The New Yorker and author of the forthcoming book, Cue the Sun! on the origins of reality TV.

On Point

*** Meghna is away this week, Deborah Becker hosts Monday to Friday. ***

  • Monday, June 24: A former IRS agent says the agency goes easy on wealthy people and corporations when investigating possible tax crimes. We look into allegations of class bias at the IRS.
  • Wednesday, June 26: The last time a new organ transplant drug was approved was over 20 years ago. Experts in the field say the major reason is the FDA is complacent with the current drugs and risk averse to changing the current end points of clinical trials and without that drug companies are not incentivized to spend tens to hundreds of millions of dollars on finding new and better drugs. What are the consequences of that and what would it take to change it.
  • Friday, June 28: Jon Favreau, Jon Lovett, and Tommy Vietor from the hit podcast Pod Save America join Deborah to talk about their new book Democracy or Else: How to Save America in 10 Easy Steps.

The Splendid Table

June 28 – Repeat episode

We’re looking at women and beermaking this week. First, Theresa McCulla, former curator of the American Brewing History Initiative at The Smithsonian, explains why beer is a great lens for examining American history. Then Atinuke Akintola Diver talks about her feature-length documentary This Belongs to Us, chronicling Black women brewers in the American south. And finally, we get beer and food pairings from Stephanie Grant of Good Beer Hunting.


Classical

Performance Today

  • June 24: Roderick Cox, conducts the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande in a performance of Samuel Barber’s Symphony No. 1 from Victory Hall, Geneva, Switzerland.
  • June 25: Juilliard String Quartet performs Eleanor Alberga’s String Quartet No. 2 at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Syracuse, NY
  • June 26: Imani Winds perform Julio Medaglia’s Belle Epoque en Sud-America at the University of Georgia Performing Arts Center in Athens, GA
  • June 27: Christian Reif, conductors the Lakes Area Music Festival Orchestra in a performance of Anna Clyne’s ‘This Midnight Hour’ from Brainerd, MN
  • June 28: Sabine Meyer performs Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto with the Basel Chamber Orchestra conducted by Giovanni Antonini in Salzburg, Austria

Classical 24

Proud to Be, 9:06 am and 6:06 pm, June 24 – June 28, 2024
In celebration of Pride Month, LGBTQIA+ classical musicians describe what Pride means to them.

  • 6/24: Sharon Isbin, guitarist
  • 6/25: Jonathan Biss, pianist
  • 6/26: Jennifer Higdon, composer
  • 6/27: Meg Rohrer, violinist/violist and advocate
  • 6/28: Stephen Hough, pianist

Extra Ecclectic with Steve Seel
Wed 10pm-12am CT

  • American contemporary symphonic works: Justin Dello Joio’s Piano Concerto “Oceans Apart,” Lou Harrison’s “The Sweetness of Epicurus,” and Kevin Puts’s Symphony No. 4.

Euro Classic
Thurs 12am CT & Sat 8pm CT

  • June 27: Max Reger’s variations on variations! His Variations on a Theme of Mozart (which Mozart himself wrote variations on, but apparently Reger didn’t think were enough), in concert from Dresden in April 2024 with the Dresden State Orchestra.
  • June 29: The Scottish Chamber Orchestra plays Felix Mendelssohn’s “Scottish” Symphony, in concert from May 2024.

Your Classical Discoveries
Sat 4-7pm CT

  • June birthdays: Grieg, Stravinsky, Elgar, Nielsen, and Richard Strauss are just a few of the big-name composers who were born in June. We’ll hear from them and many others.

APM Presents special of the week

Early Risers: Breaking Silence

Air Window: Now – September 4, 2024

In this hour, early childhood experts from around the country talk about the reasons many caregivers are not venturing into conversations about race, racism and cultural diversity and we look at the impact that has on our children, other BIPOC adults, and our early childhood programs. Finally, we explore ways to break down those barriers for the benefit of our children. We will answer the question- what is needed in our early childhood spaces to encourage the vulnerability and exploration caregivers need to enter into these essential conversations with young children?

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

APM Weekly June 17 – 21, 2024

BBC

BBC Wimbledon Update

The Wimbledon tennis tournament kicks off on Monday July 1. The BBC has a five-minute short available daily throughout the tournament that can be delivered to stations via email or download from the Media Partners Centre.

If you are interested in carrying this module, please contact your Station Rep by June 28 and they can get the files to you. **You must sign up ahead of time in order to gain access to the files**.

Broadcast Details:
Available daily Monday 1st July to Sunday 14th July.
Duration: 5 minutes
Broadcast window: daily from 20:00 GMT until 11:00 GMT the following day

Wimbledon is the oldest tennis tournament in the world and widely considered the most prestigious. It has been held at the All England Club in Wimbledon, south-west London since 1877. It is the only one of the four Grand Slam events to be played on grass. In BBC Wimbledon Update Delyth Lloyd and Lee James will present a daily five minute round-up of all the action.

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

  • Kai talks to Sarah McCusker, president of the Connecticut Library Association, about expanding access to E-Books.
  • It’s been a tough handful of years for Chinatown, which faced more hate crimes, received fewer PPP loans, and recovered more slowly compared to other parts of the city since the pandemic. Now, Chinatown is facing a succession plan problem. One of the only working-class neighborhoods left in Manhattan, the number of seniors in Chinatown has increased more than 20 percent in the last decade, according to the nonprofit Welcome to Chinatown. The stakes are high: Investors are waiting to buy out the real estate, which will inevitably change it (the Asian population has already declined more than 20% in the last decade). And a big reason why succession planning is so difficult is because Asian-Americans are still a comparatively new population in the US, most of the business owners are immigrants who have raised more educated kids who don’t want to take over. Marketplace’s Kristin Schwab reports.

Marketplace Tech

Tuesday June 18: Marketplace’s Lily Jamali visits Nautilus Biotechnology in San Carlos, CA to speak with co-founder Parag Mallick about a new era of health, ag and climate solutions.

Thursday June 20: Lily Jamali speaks with Steffi Cao, internet culture writer, about her piece in The Ringer about 2014 being the year that launched the internet as we know it today.

On Point

  • Monday, June 17: In this year’s European Union elections, far-right parties made gains across many of the EU’s 27 countries, including in France, Germany and Italy. What’s driving this shift?
  • Tuesday, June 18: Indian prime minister Narendra Modi has been elected for a third term but not by the “thumping majority” that some analysts feared might threaten democracy in India. Modi failed to win a majority and will now need to govern with the help of coalition partners. What happened and what does it tell us about the strength of democracy in India?
  • Wednesday, June 19: From Roots to the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, to Abbott Elementary. A second chance to hear Meghna’s conversation from earlier this year with Bethonie Butler. Her book, Black TV, shows how TV series centered on Black characters have evolved over the past 50 years.
  • Thursday, June 20: The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service now has a backlog of more than a million asylum cases. The wait for a hearing lasts years. We look into how America’s broken asylum system has become what some are calling a de facto immigration system and what it would take to fix it.

The Splendid Table

June 21 – New episode

This week we look at the modern world of Korean food with Deuki Hong and Matt Rodbard, authors of Koreaworld: A Cookbook and talk to acclaimed food writer Khushbu Shah about her debut cookbook Amrikan, 125 Recipes From the American Diaspora.


Classical

Performance Today

  • June 17: Saxophonist Steven Banks and pianist Pedja Muzijevic perform at the Spoleto Festival in Charleston, SC
  • June 18: Anthony McGill performs Mozart’s Clarinet Quintet in A Major with Tessa Lark, Jun Iwasaki, Jonathan Vinocour and Alisa Weilerstein at La Jolla Music Society’s Summerfest in La Jolla, California.
  • June 19: Music commemorating Juneteenth, including a performance by Sphinx Virtuosi of Michael Dudley’s “Prayer for Our Times” from Clemson University in Clemson, SC
  • June 20: Lara Downes performs excerpts of Harry T. Burleigh’s “From the Southland” from the Brevard Music Center in Brevard, NC
  • June 21: Jessica Horsley conducts the Basel Sinfonietta in a performance of Florence Price’s “Ethiopia’s Shadow in America” from Bern, Switzerland

Classical 24

Juneteenth, June 19, 2024
Listen throughout the day for music by Black composers as well as traditional spirituals.Proud to Be, 9:06 am and 6:06 pm, June 17 – June 21, 2024
In celebration of Pride Month, LGBTQIA+ classical musicians describe what Pride means to them.

  • 6/17: Brandon Patrick George, flutist with Imani Winds
  • 6/18: Mark Adamo, composer and librettist
  • 6/19: Seth Parker Woods, cellist
  • 6/20: Sara Davis Buechner, pianist
  • 6/21: Thomas Sondergaard, conductor

Extra Ecclectic with Steve Seel
Wed 10pm-12am CT

  • Fantastic Flutes: Catherine Gregory, Gareth Davies, Mary Stolper, and more play contemporary music for flute. Plus, Kojiro Umezaki play the shakuhachi, a Japanese bamboo flute, in excerpts from the album “a distance, intertwined.”

Euro Classic
Thurs 12am CT & Sat 8pm CT

  • June 20: Beethoven’s Clarinet Trio with Joë Christophe, clarinet, Maxime Quennesson, cello, and Julia Hamos, piano from a November 2023 concert in Aix-en-Provence, France.
  • June 22: Max Reger’s variations on variations! His Variations on a Theme of Mozart (which Mozart himself wrote variations on, but apparently Reger didn’t think were enough), in concert from Dresden in April 2024 with the Dresden State Orchestra.

Your Classical Discoveries
Sat 4-7pm CT

  • Summer Music: With the solstice just behind us, we’ll enjoy music for the season including the incidental music from Mendelssohn’s Midsummer Night’s Dream, Beethoven’s Pastoral Symphony, and some lesser-known surprises.

APM Presents special of the week

Witness History: Pride Month

Air Window: Now – June 30, 2024

An all-new special edition of Witness History from the BBC World Service. Remarkable stories of LGBT+ rights, told by the people who were there.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

APM Presents July – September 2024

Classical

I Hear America Singing

  • Broadcast Window: August 23, 2024 – September 30, 2024
  • Duration: One hour
  • Description: The view of one’s life’s work has taken on different meanings in societies and eras across the world. From servant and slavery systems of old, to the industrial revolution, to labor unions and the gig economy, our idea of work is ever-changing. As in all aspects of our culture, music has been a part of work every step of the way. Today, both the advent of remote-work and the emerging question of universal basic income are creating new paradigms and discussions about the meaning of work. Join Cantus for I Hear America Singing, a joyful examination of the role work has played in our lives in years past and how work might evolve into the future. Encore from 2023

Music for the Days of Awe: An Observance of the Jewish High Holidays

  • Broadcast Window: September 27, 2024 – October 31, 2024
  • Duration: One hour
  • Description: At this time of year, Jews around the world gather together to celebrate new beginnings. Host Mindy Ratner guides us in a musical observance of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, and Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, known in Hebrew as Yamim Noraim, the Days of Awe. Encore from 2023

And don’t forget to check out these specials continuing from last quarter…

A Passion for Bach and Coltrane with Imani Winds

  • Broadcast Window: Now – June 30, 2024
  • Duration: Two hours
  • Description: Jeff Scott’s new Grammy winning oratorio is full of inspiration from two giants of music – Johann Sebastian Bach and John Coltrane. Passion for Bach and Coltrane with Imani Winds is an innovative and surprising confluence of classical and jazz. Scott is the founding horn player of Imani Winds, and along with the Harlem Jazz Quartet, jazz soloists, and spoken word by AB Spellman, Passion for Bach and Coltrane offers an intimate perspective on Imani Wind’s most personal recording in their 25 year history.

Proud to Be

  • Broadcast Window: Now – June 30, 2024
  • Duration: One hour
  • Description: Pride Month is a wonderful time to celebrate our unique identities and to reflect on how pride and authenticity show up in our lives. We asked classical musicians in the LGBTQIA community about their thoughts on Pride. The answers we got were incredibly diverse and thought-provoking. This one-hour special brings all of those thoughts to you punctuated with music performed, conducted or composed by these featured artists.

APM Presents Specials July – September, 2024

News / Talk

Inheriting: Nicole & The Third Liberation Front

  • Broadcast Window: July 15 – September 30, 2024
  • Description: Nicole Salaver’s uncle, Patrick Salaver, was one of the leaders of the Third World Liberation Front at San Francisco State University in the late 1960s. This movement not only led to the recognition of the term “Asian American,” but also brought ethnic studies to colleges nationwide. She calls Pat “the Forest Gump of Filipino American history,” a significant, yet still largely unknown, Filipino civil rights leader who made a difference in the world. Now, Nicole wants to set the record straight and honor her uncle’s legacy, while building her own.

Off the Path

  • Broadcast Window: August 5, 2024 – September 30, 2024
  • Description: For years, Off the Path has explored spots from New York to Boston and beyond — everything from quirky roadside attractions to eccentric oddities to places with deep historical significance. This year, host Davis Dunavin is going to sea. We’re telling stories of submarines, lighthouses, white whales, sea monsters, and — of course — pirates. From old sailing ships to lighthouses, there’s just something special about the places that have nautical history and home to famous pirates — Captain Kidd, Black Sam Bellamy, William Fly. We experience their traditions through sea shanties and ballads of adventures at sea.

Love Across the Divide

  • Broadcast Window: August 23, 2024 – November 15, 2024
  • Description: Older singles are more likely than their younger counterparts to say it’s very important that online dating profiles include a potential partner’s ideology. Indeed, romantic relationships are built on shared values. But does this mean two people need to be aligned politically to have a deep connection and strong bond? Can one truly be considered liberal if they habitually swipe left on conservatives? In this special, Dating While Gray host Laura Stassi talks to older Americans about ideological differences and their role in making and maintaining romantic connections. She also taps expert voices to help all of us decide how and why to navigate political differences in the pursuit of love.

And don’t forget these specials that will be continuing through the summer…

How Does the Russian Propaganda Machine Work? Are There Lessons for the United States?

  • Broadcast Window: Now – July 31, 2024
  • Description: From Audible podcast, In the Room with Peter Bergen, a new special about that state of journalism in Russia. Objective reporting about the war in Ukraine is now against the law in Russia and journalists can’t even use the word “war” in their stories. But it wasn’t always like this. Two veteran Russian journalists, who’ve experienced the changes firsthand, explain what’s happened and how “fake news” has helped solidify authoritarian rule in Russia.

Early Risers: Breaking Silence

  • Broadcast Window: Now – September 4, 2024
  • Description: In this hour, early childhood experts from around the country talk about the reasons many caregivers are not venturing into conversations about race, racism and cultural diversity and we look at the impact that has on our children, other BIPOC adults, and our early childhood programs. Finally, we explore ways to break down those barriers for the benefit of our children. We will answer the question- what is needed in our early childhood spaces to encourage the vulnerability and exploration caregivers need to enter into these essential conversations with young children?

Selected Shorts: Wishful Thinking

  • Broadcast Window: Now – August 31, 2024
  • Description: Summertime, and the living is easy, and if it isn’t, all you need is a charming trio of works curated by the producers of Selected Shorts about summer wishes and wishful thinking. Hear works from Zadie Smith (performed by the author), Carys Davies, and Ray Bradbury performed by Jane Kaczmarek and Sean Astin.

APM Weekly June 10 -14, 2024

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

  • The Biden administration has pinned much of its renewable energy ambition on a single resource: offshore wind. But the one-two punch of inflation and rising interest rates means more proposed wind farms have been canceled than built. States/utilities (energy buyers) and project developers (the sellers) both say they’re still committed to standing up an offshore wind industry in the U.S. Marketplace’s Dan Ackerman reports on how do they plan to make that happen amid turbulent economic waters?

Marketplace Morning Report

IRL Series

The statistics are everywhere: AI is poised to replace X number of jobs in Y number of years. But even if AI takes over the digital nine to five, there will still be jobs in the physical world. Our question next week: who gets the skills to get those jobs? Marketplace Morning Report host David Brancaccio traveled to Georgia to look at pipelines of people from all walks of life who will have the skills to work and create in real life, for a series we’re calling: Jobs IRL: In Real Life.

Monday, June 10: “That’s show business”
Episode one focuses in on Georgia’s burgeoning film industry. Aspiring directors and screenwriters can go to college for their education. But for all the other folks in film credits and on film sets, where do they find their training? David Brancaccio spent time with the state-backed Georgia Film Academy to learn how they get people from community and technical colleges onto film sets. He also visits the set of Kevin Bacon’s latest TV show and gets a lesson on how training programs like the Georgia Film Academy figure into the economic calculus of where filming happens.

Tuesday, June 11: “A unique apprenticeship”
Episode two takes the listener to the border between Georgia and South Carolina, where one hundred apprentices are hard at work performing a number of tasks they can only talk about in the vaguest notions. They’re working at the Savannah River Site, which was first set up in the Cold War to make materials like plutonium for nuclear weapons. Nowadays, the site focuses on things like processing spent fuel rods pulled from nuclear reactors and storing nuclear materials to support nonproliferation efforts. David Brancaccio spent time at the site, learning about how a massive need for local talent led to this unique apprenticeship being born.

Wednesday June 12: “EVs meet the road”
Episode three sees David Brancaccio travel to just outside the city of Savannah, where car maker Hyundai is betting big on electric vehicles by building a “Metaplant” factory capable of pumping out 300,000 EVs per year. To build those EVs, Hyundai and its suppliers have partnered with the state’s Quickstart program, which is helping train their workers so that on day one of the Metaplant going live, they’ll be on the assembly line and ready to go. David Brancaccio spoke with trainees, trainers, and decision makers on both sides to learn about how a place with a scant history of making cars is gearing up to make a truckload of them.

Marketplace Tech

Monday June 10: Marketplace’s Lily Jamali sits down with Reddit CEO Steve Huffman to talk about the company post-IPO and the future of Reddit.

Tuesday June 11: Lily Jamali meets with California Attorney General Rob Bonta to talk about data privacy and protections for young users of the internet.

On Point

  • Monday, June 10: Etsy used to be the place to shop for quirky, handmade items from independent crafters all over the world. Now, it’s flooded with mass-produced products. What happened to Etsy?
  • Tuesday, June 11: Infinite value on saving a life and zero value on “whether [lockdowns] totally disrupts people’s lives, ruins the economy, and has many kids kept out of school.” That’s what the former head of the National Institutes of Health said in 2023 about public health priorities during COVID. We talk to public health experts now about what we now know went wrong in the pandemic and what we can do better when another pandemic hits.
  • Wednesday, June 12: Dreams have long held cultural significance in society, but what do we know about the science behind our nocturnal fantasies? After studying years of research and thousands of dream reports, neuroscientist Dr. Rahul Jandial tells Meghna that dreams can benefit us: from helping regulate emotions to even processing trauma.
  • Friday, June 15: History tells us how humans will treat each other – but the past 75 years have been an anomaly. That’s according to British historian Simon Sebag Montefiore who studied the past one thousand years. Another chance to hear Meghna’s conversation with Montefiore about human behavior since 1945 and where he thinks we are headed next.

The Splendid Table

June 14 – Repeat episode

Francis is taking your vegetarian summer cooking questions this week with our friend, the award-winning writer Hetty Lui McKinnon. Her new book Tenderheart, A Cookbook About Vegetables and Unbreakable Family Bonds. Then we turn to the art of leftovers with Tamar Adler author of The Everlasting Meal Cookbook.


Classical

Performance Today

  • June 10: Anthony McGill and the Catalyst Quartet perform Samuel Coleridge-Taylor’s Clarinet Quintet in F-sharp minor at Chamber Music Northwest from Reed College in Portland, OR
  • June 11: Jaime Martin conducts the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra in a performance of Alberto Ginastera’s Variaciones Concertantes, from Los Angeles, CA
  • June 12: Wolfgang Amadeus Apollo’s Fire performs Mozart’s Overture to Don Giovanni from the Severance Music Center in Cleveland, OH
  • June 13: Harlem Quartet performs excerpts from William Grant Still’s Lyric Quartet from the Maverick Concert Hall in Woodstock, NY
  • June 14: Nikki Chooi, Timothy Chooi and Clayton Stephenson perform Moritz Moszkowski’s Suite For Two Violins & Piano in G minor from Hayden’s Ferry Chamber Music Series in Tempe, AZ

Classical 24

New Classical Tracks with Julie Amacher
Wed 7:15am/5pm CT & Sat 9am CT

  • Julie Amacher speaks with cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason, violinist Nicola Benedetti and pianist Benjamin Grosvenor and their new album Beethoven Triple Concerto.

Extra Ecclectic with Steve Seel
Wed 10pm-12am CT

  • Summer Festival Preview! Tune in to hear where and when some of today’s most influential musicians are performing this summer, including Julien Brocal, Jennifer Koh, Clarice Assad, Connor Chee, Awadagin Pratt, Sterling Elliott, and more.

Euro Classic
Thurs 12am CT & Sat 8pm CT

  • June 13: Cellist Santiago Cañón-Valencia joins the Spanish Radio and TV Orchestra for Shostakovich’s Cello Concerto No. 1, in concert from October in Madrid.
  • June 15: Thomas Adès is known as one of today’s most famous composers, but we’ll hear him conducting Leos Janacek’s Sinfonietta, in concert from Leipzig’s Gewandhaus last September.

Rhapsody in Black
Thurs 9pm CT & Sun 4pm CT

  • Where we turn up the voices of Black artists in the world of classical music. This week focuses on American composer and pianist Scott Joplin.

Saturday Cinema
Sat 10am – 12pm CT

  • Tony Awards and the Movies: films that have been made from Broadway plays (and musicals)

Your Classical Discoveries
Sat 4-7pm CT

  • Fathers and Sons: As we celebrate Father’s Day weekend, we’ll hear some great father/son duos (and some in-laws as well), including Dmitri and Maxim Shostakovich, Franz Liszt and Richard Wagner, Leopold and Wolfgang Mozart, Antonin Dvorak and Josef Suk, and naturally – lots of Bachs.

APM Presents special of the week

Selected Shorts: Wishful Thinking

Air Window: Now – June 30, 2024

Summertime, and the living is easy, and if it isn’t, all you need is a charming trio of works curated by the producers of Selected Shorts about summer wishes and wishful thinking. Hear works from Zadie Smith (performed by the author), Carys Davies, and Ray Bradbury performed by Jane Kaczmarek and Sean Astin.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

APM Weekly June 3 – June 7, 2024

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

  • Kai talks to Ruchir Sharma about his new book “What Wrong With Capitialism?”
  • Much is being said about how airfares over the past several decades have become cheaper if you factor in inflation. It’s true that a trip to, say Paris, in the 1980s was only within reach to a small group of people in America. Now it’s more and more affordable. But does that really balance out with the sorry state of air travel these days? In other words, if you take away all the perks people had—bigger seats, better (and free) meals, checked luggage, an overall superior experience—are passengers really better off now? Marketplace’s Meghan McCerty Carino reports.

Marketplace Morning Report

Week of June 3: Marketplace Morning Report is spending part of the week looking at some of the ways cities are adapting for the future of how we work and live. A lot of these changes were sped up by the pandemic and the work-from-home revolution it ushered in. But many were also long-time coming – such as the shift toward electrification and automation taking place in the auto industry. In Detroit, the shift to high-tech has meant evolving to attract a new workforce.

Marketplace’s Nova Safo begins our coverage on Monday, June 3rd with a visit to a gleaming example of that evolution: Detroit’s long-abandoned train station, which has been brought back to life by the Ford Motor Company, as a new center for tech innovation.

Marketplace Tech

Monday June 3: Marketplace’s Lily Jamali speaks with Adam Riess, Johns Hopkins University, about his latest research working with the James Webb Space Telescope.

Wednesday June 5: Lily Jamali speaks with Antoaneta Roussi, cybersecurity reporter for POLITICO, about cyberattacks and the Paris 2024 Olympics.

On Point

  • Monday, June 3: Being alone often gets a bad rap. But research shows that alone time can actually boost overall well-being from increasing our emotional regulation, contentment to creativity. We explore the power of solitude with Thuy-vy Nguyen, co-author of Solitude: the science and power of being alone.
  • Friday, June 7: The US army has officially deployed a pair of high energy lasers to blast incoming enemy drones out of the sky. It’s the first publicly known deployment of a ‘directed energy’ system for air defense in military history and could mark a tipping point for the use of laser weapons more broadly by militaries around the world. What does the future of laser warfare look like?

The Splendid Table

June 7 – Repeat episode

This week we spend the hour with Martin Yan, a man whose impact on Chinese cooking in America is immeasurable. At the age of 33 in 1978 he became one of the first people of Asian descent to host a cooking show in the United States. Yan Can Cook was seen on public television alongside the likes of Julia Child and Jacque Pepin. He is the author of over 20 books, a successful restaurateur and is currently the host of Martin Yan, Quick and Easy.


Classical

Performance Today

  • June 3: PT Young Artist in Residence: harpist Jane Yoo joins Fred Child for music and conversation at our Saint Paul studio.
  • June 4: Violinist Bella Hristova performs David Ludwig’s Concerto for Violin and Orchestra with the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, from Buffalo, NY
  • June 5: Williamsburg Symphony Orchestra performs “For Justice and Peace” by Xavier Foley, featuring soloists Xavier Foley and Eunice Kim. Conducted by Michael Butterman, from Williamsburg, VA.
  • June 6: Pekka Kuusisto, conducts the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra in a performance of Louise Farrenc’s Symphony No. 3 in G minor, from the Ordway Concert Hall, in Saint Paul, MN
  • June 7: Pianist Marc-Andre Hamelin performs Florence Price’s Piano Quintet No. 2 in A minor with the Takacs Quartet at the University of Georgia in Athens, GA.

Classical 24

Extra Ecclectic with Steve Seel
Wed 10pm-12am CT

  • Great pianists of new music: Michael Harrison plays his own music, as does Timo Andres in his Pulitzer-nominated concerto “The Blind Banister.” Also, pianist Inna Faliks plays composer and pianist Fazil Say’s “Black Earth,” and the Bowed Piano Ensemble manipulates the grand piano’s innards in the late Stephen Scott’s “Music One for Bowed Strings.”

Euro Classic
Thurs 12am CT & Sat 8pm CT

  • June 6: Though in our hearts and minds, we’re all in summer mode, it’s still technically spring for a few more weeks! We’ll hear an overture from Johann Fischer’s “Le Journal du Printemps” in concert from May 7, 2024, in Copenhagen with the baroque ensemble Concerto Copenhagen.
  • June 8: We head to Stockholm to hear the Swedish Chamber Orchestra play Schubert’s 4th Symphony, in concert from March 2024.

Your Classical Discoveries
Sat 4-7pm CT

  • Summer Travel Season! We explore music about travel, exotic and beautiful places, and the warmth of summertime.

APM Presents special of the week

Proud to Be

Air Window: May 31 – June 30, 2024

Pride Month is a wonderful time to celebrate our unique identities and to reflect on how pride and authenticity show up in our lives. We asked classical musicians in the LGBTQIA community about their thoughts on Pride. The answers we got were incredibly diverse and thought-provoking. This one-hour special brings all of those thoughts to you punctuated with music performed, conducted or composed by these featured artists.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

APM Weekly May 27 – May 31, 2024

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

  • Our Breaking Ground series from Phoenix continues—Kai looks at what the increase in government investment in semiconductors means for the city’s housing market. A story about one neighborhood.
  • Kai talks to economics writer and content creator Kyla Scanlon about her new book “In This Economy? How Money and Markets Really Work.”.

Marketplace Tech

Tuesday May 28: How do we talk to friends and family about mis and disinformation? On this episode of our series “Decoding Democracy,” Marketplace’s Lily Jamali and Kimberly Adams are joined by experts with tips on how to have these uncomfortable conversations.

Wednesday May 29: Lily Jamali speaks with Sharon Lerner, ProPublica, about her reporting on how scientists were made to believe that PFAS in human blood was actually safe.

On Point

  • Monday, May 27: A September 2023 report by the U.S. Government Accountability Office revealed poor living conditions inside military barracks – from mold and exposed sewage, to broken windows, and nonexistent HVAC systems. In fact, the Defense Department has been made aware of systemic and bureaucratic failures in its oversight of military housing for years. In this rebroadcast episode we hear why the D.O.D continues to have difficulty keeping track of housing conditions on its own domestic bases.
  • Tuesday, May 28: Stoicism has been having a moment.The ancient Greco-Roman philosophy professed that “the goal of all inquiry is to provide a mode of conduct characterized by tranquility of mind and certainty of moral worth.” Joe Rogan is an advocate. Silicon Valley tech bros have an annual conference about it. What is it about stoicism that is making so many people turn to it today to find a peaceful place and take control of their lives?
  • Wednesday, May 29: Oregon made history in 2020 when it became the first state in the nation to decriminalize possession of small amounts of hard drugs like cocaine, heroin, or meth amphetamine. But last month – the state repealed it. So, what happened? .
  • Friday, May 31: A roundtable of working class Democratic voters tell us how they hear the Democratic Party’s messaging and how that resonates – or not – with them.

The Splendid Table

May 31 – Repeat episode

This week we’re all about buying seafood when you’re doing the cooking at home. We talk to Jennifer Bushman, an aquaculture advocate and creator of Sea Pantry, a sustainable seafood initiative and resource for the home cook. And, since we know you have questions, we’ve invited Genevieve Ko, Senior Editor of The New York Times Cooking to help Francis take your fishy-related calls.


Classical

Performance Today

  • May 27: Music for Memorial Day, including performances from Lake Music Festival in Brainerd, MN; Jeremy Denk in Aspen, CO and Nicholas Canellakis and Jon Kimura Parker in Bridgehampton, NY
  • May 28: Kirill Gerstein performs Sergei Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No.2 in C minor with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Hannu Lintu
  • May 29: Timothy McAllister and Liz Ames perform Alexander Glazunov’s Saxophone Concerto in E-flat Major from Interlochen, MI
  • May 30: Joshua Bell and Peter Dugan perform Maurice Ravel’s Violin Sonata No. 2 in G major at the University of Georgia Performing Arts Center in Athens, GA
  • May 31: A performance from the Phoenix Chamber Music Festival of Charles Martin Loeffler’s once-lost Octet, arranged by Graeme Steele Johnson in Phoenix, AZ

APM Presents special of the week

Witness History: Pride Month

Air Window: June 1 – June 30, 2024

An all-new special edition of Witness History from the BBC World Service. Remarkable stories of LGBT+ rights, told by the people who were there.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

BBC Monthly – June 2024

June 2024

The full list of available BBC documentaries can be found here. Look for these specials and their promos on Content Depot.  

Witness History: Pride Month
June 1 – June 30, 2024
One hour

An all-new special edition of Witness History from the BBC World Service. Remarkable stories of LGBT+ rights, told by the people who were there.

World Questions: Michigan, USA
June 8 – July 5, 2024
One hour

A debate with leading lawmakers and campaigners in Michigan, USA. The cost of living, abortion laws, parental control in schools and an upcoming Presidential election – all will be up for debate in the swing state of Michigan, USA. Anu Anand will present the program, which will be recorded in front of a local audience in the state capital of Lansing.

The Forum: Music on the move
June 22 – July 19, 2024
One hour

A brief history of portable music. Most of us remember the first portable music gadget we owned; a transistor radio, a boombox, a Walkman or perhaps an iPod. We might even recall the songs we played on it. But we might be less aware of how profoundly audio technology developments from the 1950s to 2000s changed the ways in which we consume music outside of the home or concert venue.

Iszi Lawrence discusses the history of portable music with Dr. Annie Jamieson, curator of sound technologies at Bradford’s National Science and Media Museum, American drummer and poet Damon Krukowski, Jahnavi Phalkey, science historian and Founding Director of Science Gallery Bengaluru, and World Service listeners.