What’s coming up from APM January 25-31

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.

News 

Marketplace 

Week of January 25 

Marketplace (PM) 

  • Kai talks with truck driver Kearsey Rothlander about what makes a good truck stop, and how life on the road has been in this pandemic. We also hear from managers at two of her favorite stops, ASAP’s travel plaza in Oklahoma and Traveler’s Oasis in Idaho about what COVID-19 has meant for their businesses and foot traffic. 
  • Unemployed Americans whose benefits were running out are now receiving the extra $300/wk in benefits provided by the most recent relief bill. Marketplace’s Sam Fields reports on what difference that added income is making in the lives of people who’ve lost jobs in the pandemic economy. 

Marketplace Tech 

  • We’ll speak with Jay Koh, managing director of the private equity firm Lightsmith Group, about how investment in climate tech will be affected by new policies from the Biden administration. 

On Point 

Week of January 25 

  • The administration’s push for economic relief during Covid-19 was unveiled in the form of President Biden’s $1.9 trillion stimulus plan. What is he proposing, and will it pass Congress?  
  • The Pentagon is intensifying efforts to combat a surge of extremism in the military. Out of the suspects that the FBI has identified so far in the Capitol insurrection, at least six have links to the military. We’ll dive into the years-long problem and what it will take to confront it.  

Classical 

Performance Today 

In the next six weeks, Performance Today listeners will hear a major musical work composed or performed by a Black artist each hour of the show, every day in the month of February.

The program regularly features BIPOC composers, conductors and performers, but this will be a special celebration of the contribution of Black artists in honor of Black History Month. 

Arts and Culture 

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes you back to the sounds of a specific year with a carefully curated list of the best songs. Plus, he’ll invite you to reexamine some deeper cuts as we look back on what happened that year in music, pop culture and the world. 

January 29 – 1997:

A year of transition in music. Radiohead dropped a masterpiece with Ok Computer, Notorious BIG released Life After Death just days after his own death, neo soul artists like Erykah Badu gained a following, and there were Britpop classics from The Verve, Blur, and Oasis. Prodigy and Chemical Brothers brought Electronica up from the underground, and pop music was on the rise with NSync, Hanson and Spice Girls ruling Top 40.

Bob Dylan put out a classic, Foo Fighters saluted their hero, and Buena Vista Social Club introduced a generation to Cuban music. Outside the world of music, Titanic and Jurassic Park dominated the box office, Bill Clinton began his second term and the world mourned the loss of Princess Diana. 

The Splendid Table 

As The Splendid Table continues to take listener home cooking questions, please follow the program’s updates on Twitter and encourage listeners to send in their questions as voice memos to contact@splendidtable.org, or via phone at 800-537-5252.  

Encore episode – January 29:  

  • This week, we are bringing you a show recorded live at the 2019 Hot Docs Podcast Festival in Toronto. Francis and his team of intrepid eaters will tackle an enticing question: what makes Toronto so delicious?
  • Guests include former host of Viceland’s It’s Suppertime, Matty “Canadian Legend” Matheson, Toronto food, drink and travel writer Suresh Doss and New York Times food columnist and host of Weeknight Kitchen podcast Melissa Clark.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Black History Month with APM

We have several specials available to help stations commemorate Black History Month this February. You can find more information at our website, or contact your station representative for more information.

Selected Shorts: Celebrating James Baldwin

LeVar Burton, known for his work on the award-winning series Roots, Reading Rainbow, and Star Trek: The Next Generation

Guest host LeVar Burton presents a program celebrating the author he calls “potent and polemical.” Christopher Jackson reads an excerpt from Baldwin’s famous letter The Fire Next Time: in “My Dungeon Shook,” he addresses internalized racism.

Next, Anthony Rapp performs an excerpt from Giovanni’s Room, in which an expat comes to terms with his sexuality and loneliness in Paris. And Baldwin contemplates The Great Migration in his novel Go Tell It On The Mountain. We hear an excerpt performed by Charlayne Woodard.

Broadcast Window: January 5, 2021 – February 28, 2021

Note: This program originally aired in 2019.

Lift Every Voice: A Musical Story from Sorrow to Justice

A collection of powerful songs, stories and interviews with some of today’s most acclaimed Black Artists and Scholars.

This program was curated with the intent of creating awareness around the African American musical past, while inspiring listeners to cling to the hopefulness of our musical future together as every voice is heard and celebrated.

Broadcast Window: January 28, 2021 – February 28, 2021

Witness History: Black History Month Special

This special features eyewitness accounts of important moments in recent African American history.

Professor Gloria Browne-Marshall; Image courtesy of Professor Browne-Marshall’s website.

We hear from the daughter of the man named in the court case which became a turning point in the battle for civil rights, plus the sister of a teenage girl killed in a racist bomb attack. We learn how the winning performance of an all-Black basketball team helped change White American’s attitude to segregation in sport.

Later, hear about Rodney King, whose attack by police in 1991 was caught on camera and seen by millions – the later acquittal of the officers sparked days of rioting. Finally we hear from Bilal Chatman, who was sentenced to 150 years in prison under the 1994 ‘three strikes law’ which disproportionately affected Black Americans.

Presenter Max Pearson talks to Professor Gloria Browne-Marshall of John Jay College of Criminal Justice to help put it all into context.

Broadcast Window: February 1 – 28, 2021
Length: One hour

Performance Today: Black History Month

Performance Today listeners will hear a major musical work composed or performed by a Black artist each hour of the show, every day in the month of February.

The program regularly features BIPOC composers, conductors, and performers, but this will be a special celebration of the contribution of Black artists in honor of Black History Month. 

Broadcast Window: February 1 – 28, 2021

Questions? Reach out to your station representative here.

What’s coming up from APM January 18-24

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.

News

BBC World Service

The BBC World Service will be covering the events of the Inauguration of President-Elect Joe Biden on January 20. Look for ContentDepot updates next week for any schedule and clock changes.

Marketplace

Week of January 18

Marketplace (PM) 

  • Before the inauguration, we’ll take a look at three states – Nebraska, Florida and Hawaii – with different unemployment rates.  Nebraska has the lowest, Florida matches the national number and Hawaii has the highest. Kai will interview small business owners across those states to show the complicated recovery path for this economy. 

Kai talks to Reshma Saujani, founder and CEO of Girls Who Code.     

On Point 

Week of January 18 

  • Meghna talks with public health workers and community members in LA County who are facing one of the world’s worst coronavirus surges. UCLA epidemiologist Anne Rimoin shares how Los Angeles can get control of the virus.   
  • On the eve of President-Elect Joe Biden’s inauguration, photographer Matt Mendelsohn looks back to 2008 – when he took President Obama’s favorite photograph of that historic election night. 

The Daily 

January 18

 The Life of John Lewis (encore): A look at the extraordinary life of the civil rights icon, Representative John Lewis.

Classical 

Performance Today 

January 18

The show will be dedicated to the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Listeners will hear pieces of music that were meaningful to him, music that was written about him and music inspired by his commitment to social justice.

The first hour of the show will also include the world premiere of a composition written in response to the killing of George Floyd.

Arts and Culture 

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes you back to the sounds of a specific year with a carefully curated list of the best songs. Plus, he’ll invite you to reexamine some deeper cuts as we look back on what happened that year in music, pop culture and the world. 

January 22 – 1981:  

A year of new artists emerging like Stray Cats and The Go Go’s and second albums from Pretenders and Psychedelic Furs. It was a big year for Prince, who opened for the Rolling Stones and issued Controversy. Earth Wind and Fire were the biggest R&B band around, David Bowie and Queen collaborated on a song that has aged nicely, Journey made a song for the ages, and reggae legend Bob Marley died of cancer at the age of 36. 

Outside the world of music, Ronald Reagan became President and was shot in the same year, there was a royal wedding as Prince Charles & Lady Diana tied the knot, Sandra Day O’Connor became the first woman on the U.S Supreme Court, and Major League baseball lost 38% of its games due to a strike. 

The Splendid Table 

As The Splendid Table continues to take listener home cooking questions, please follow the program’s updates on Twitter and encourage listeners to send in their questions as voice memos to contact@splendidtable.org, or via phone at 800-537-5252.  

New episode – January 22: Cooking by feel 

  • Nik Sharma, author of The Flavor Equation wants us to think about texture when we cook at home. 
  • Chef and author Vivian Howard will be in-house to take listener calls. Her latest book is This Will Make it Taste Good.    

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Regarding APM, The New York Times, Caliphate and The Daily

In pursuit of transparency, APM wanted to bring to light how we’ve been collaborating with PRPD, our station partners, and The New York Times over the course of the last few weeks.

In collaboration with the Public Radio Program Directors Association and affiliate station leadership, APM sent a letter to our partners at The New York Times last night to inform them of the public radio network’s concerns concerning Caliphate and The Daily.

We deliver trusted programming to listeners across the country, and when that trust is shaken, we have a responsibility to ensure it is addressed. We are optimistic that our communication between The New York Times, PRPD, and our station partners continues a dialogue so that we further our collective work addressing journalistic principles and inequities in the workplace while serving audiences.

You can view The New York Times’ response to the open letter at this link.

If you have any questions, do not hesitate to reach out to your APM Station Relations Representative.

What’s coming up from APM January 11-17

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.

News

Marketplace


Week of January 11

Marketplace (PM)


• Kai interviews FCC Chairman Ajit Pai about the future of net neutrality and his role as Chairman during the Trump administration.
• Kai talks to Cornelius Blanding, executive director of the Federation of Southern Cooperatives/Land Assistance Fund about how COVID-19 aid for farmers has and hasn’t been working for members of the Federation.

Marketplace Tech


• January 11: Could there be and equivalent of the Geneva Convention for disinformation? We talk with former General Bob Latiff, who believes there could be and that now is the moment for the Biden administration to lead the charge. 
• January 12: One thing that’s expected from the incoming Biden administration is a big stimulus plan. One company that was saved by the last one in 2009 was Tesla. What climate tech company could a big stimulus save this time—and what climate tech is going to be funded?  Guest: Jay Koh, of Lightsmith Partners, which focuses on climate adaptation tech.
• January 13: Can we expect a major privacy bill from the Democratically controlled Senate, with support from the Biden administration?  Guest: Jessica Lee, privacy lawyer at Loeb & Loeb.
• January 14: What will President Biden’s approach to surveillance be, specifically around facial recognition and encryption?

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes you back to the sounds of a specific year with a carefully curated list of the best songs. Plus, he’ll invite you to reexamine some deeper cuts as we look back on what happened that year in music, pop culture and the world. 

January 15 – 1971:  

  • A year of classic rock albums from across the pond like The Who’s Who’s Next, Led Zeppelin 4 and The Rolling Stones’ Sticky Fingers. There were funk & soul classics from Marvin Gaye, who issued his masterpiece “What’s Going On ” the same year as There’s a Riot Going On from Sly and the Family Stone & Funkadelic dropped Maggot Brain. There were folk classics from Joni Mitchell & Carole King and former Chicago postman John Prine issued his fabulous debut. Outside the world of music, Apollo 14 lands on the moon, Gene Hackman starred in The French Connection and Joe Frazier defeated Muhammed Ali to claim the heavyweight title. 

The Splendid Table

As The Splendid Table continues to take listener home cooking questions, please follow the program’s updates on Twitter and encourage listeners to send in their questions as voice memos to contact@splendidtable.org, or via phone at 800-537-5252.  

Encore episode – January 15: Cooking in the cold 

  • We talk about Siberian cuisine with Alissa Timoshkina author of, Salt & Time. 
  • The YouTube Korean cooking star Maangchi, author of Maangchi’s Big Book of Korean Cooking, tells us about Korean bone broth.  
  • Tyler Kord, the author of Dynamite Chicken from Food 52, invites Francis into his kitchen to give him a family food lesson, a recipe for Spicy Chocolate Milk -Simmered Chicken.   

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

In the Dark – How a Podcast Helped Save Curtis Flowers From Death Row

In the Dark is a podcast hosted and narrated by Madeleine Baran and produced by Samara Freemar. This podcast features investigative journalism by APM Reports and is the recipient of the Peabody, Polk and duPont awards.

Curtis Flowers is cleared of all charges after 23 years

CBS’ primetime news program 60 Minutes featured the acclaimed podcast In the Dark in its Sunday, Jan. 3, episode. The segment tells the story of Curtis Flowers, a man tried six times for the same crime, and the remarkable role of the APM Reports’ investigative podcast, which brought the case to national attention.

The Jan. 3 episode features interviews with members of the In the Dark team, as well as a deep look at the Flowers case and the podcast’s impact. APM Reports’ journalism in the second season of its hit investigative podcast contributed to the overturning of Flowers’ death row conviction.

In the Dark’s powerful investigative reporting and riveting storytelling in Season Two spurred nationwide interest in the case and has been downloaded more than 40 million times.

Watch the full segment here.

Performance Today Overview as shared by Fred Child

We spoke with Fred Child, host of Performance Today, to learn more about the popular classical music program including its origin, mission, and the processes applied in selecting music and artists to highlight. Fred has hosted Performance Today since 2000 and is a lifelong lover of music. 

Fred Child has hosted Performance Today since 2000

What is the origin of the show? Performance Today was founded in 1987 by NPR, National Public Radio.  It was initially conceived as a bridge between the morning news program, Morning Edition, and midday music (then in vogue on many stations that carried both news and music.

How has its mission/focus evolved?  Performance Today is a music program with a clear focus on classical music and those two words:  Performance Today.  In the beginning, and still, the focus is on music in PERFORMANCE – i.e., the presence and vitality found in concert recordings.  And TODAY: the current state of the music scene – contemporary music, diverse talent and the most inventive and enthralling of today’s interpreters of the great works of the past. 

What is your philosophy as host?  To convey a true love of music, to share that joy in an accessible way with listeners and to be an exclusive home for recordings and concert highlights not heard anywhere else – all while providing a certain degree of musical insight and occasional education tidbit for those interested, while not hectoring those who aren’t.

Share the talk:music Ratios:   9.5 minutes of talk and 49.5 minutes of music each hour. (1/0 billboard; .5/4.5 cutaway; 3/18 seg003; 0/1 seg004; 2/18 seg005; 0/1 seg006;  3/9 seg007) Episodes that include a performance interview typically have more talk, but the talk segment in those cases does not exceed 3.5 minutes.

How much “new/contemporary” classical is played per program/per year?   Generally, a new piece of classical music broadcasts on Performance Today once per program, a couple of times each week – or roughly 100-150 contemporary pieces annually of the approximately 1600 featured pieces of music on our show each year (about 5-10% of our music).


How are the new pieces introduced on PT selected?  Our producers listen to live concert recordings after the year 2000 that we receive from around the world.  From those we chose compositions that are musically interesting, have fascinating stories behind them and fit in our programming principle to ‘delight and surprise.’

How are the traditional pieces played on PT chosen?  Producers choose familiar classical pieces to broadcast on the show when the performance is exceptionally outstanding or inclusive or rare performance nuances.

How are the artists/composers highlighted selected?   We feature performers and composers whose artistry we find captivating.

Tell us more about the available ::30 Imaging Spots:  These ::30 second daily promo spots are available to stations to help to encourage listeners who aren’t familiar with PT to familiarize themselves with the show.  In addition, the spots also work to promote specific pieces of music or stories coming up on the next program so as to underscore the program’s capacity for discovery, access and the storytelling within the genre of contemporary classical music.

What’s coming up from APM January 4-10

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.

News

Marketplace

Week of January 4

Marketplace (PM)

  • Kai talks with Koa Beck about her new book White Feminism: From the Suffragettes to Influencers and Who they Leave Behind.
  • Marketplace is following three small biz retailers throughout the holidays – what they are facing in terms of selling & shipping. We check back in with Irene Kesselman (Ali Cat toys in Carrboro, NC), Rue Newby (Label by Three in Phoenix, AZ), and Annie Lang Hartman (Compass Paper, Co in Lealanau County, Michigan).

Marketplace Tech

  • January 4: Telehealth has spiked dramatically since the start of the pandemic. PwC’s Health Research Institute put out a report in December, saying telehealth will be huge in 2021, but there are roadblocks, especially around racial equity.
  • January 5: This is the first time that AI could be playing a role in creating our congressional districts. What does that mean, will it actually help, and which companies stand to benefit?

Arts and Culture

NEW: Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes you back to the sounds of a specific year with a carefully curated list of the best songs. Plus, he’ll invite you to reexamine some deeper cuts as we look back on what happened that year in music, pop culture and the world.

January 8: 1996

  • The Fugees scored big with the album The Score, Beck dropped his best yet and 2PAC released his first ever rap double album – the same year he was gunned down. Sublime & Rage Against the Machine both issued debut albums, The Wallflowers featuring Bob Dylan’s son Jacob had their biggest year, and there were phenomena like The Spice Girls and the Macarena. Outside the world of music, Clinton and Gore won a 2nd term, over 12 million Americans tuned in to watch the final episode of Murder, She Wrote, AOL was the biggest website around and Dolly the Sheep became the first mammal ever cloned. Brett Favre and the Green Bay Packers were on their way to winning the Super Bowl, Michael Jordan and the Bulls won their 4th NBA title and the New York Yankees won their 1st world series in 18 years.

The Splendid Table

As The Splendid Table continues to take listener home cooking questions, please follow the program’s updates on Twitter and encourage listeners to send in their questions as voice memos to contact@splendidtable.org, or via phone at 800-537-5252.

NEW episode – January 8:

  • Soup is on this week with award-winning chef Jenn Louis and her new book The Chicken Soup Manifesto. Jenn answers listener questions and brings us her uniquely global take on chicken soup. She’s collected recipes from all over the world, from Algeria to Columbia to Panama.
  • Then, the Splendid Table staff holds a taste-off of store-bought chicken stock. Make sure you tune in to find out who the winner is.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

What’s coming up from APM December 28-January 3

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.

News

Marketplace

Week of December 28

Marketplace (PM)

  • Kimberly Adams talks to Lynzee Loveridge, executive editor at the Anime News Network, about the anime industry in 2020.
  • Some people have started receiving COVID-19 vaccines. But the clinical trials roll on. In fact, as Blake Farmer of WPLN in Nashville reports, they’re still recruiting participants – and they’re particularly focused on signing up people who tend not to be part of clinical trials.

Marketplace Tech

  • December 28: Technology will be key to helping us adapt to climate change.  But who will have access and what if some solutions make the problem worse for others? An excerpt of our special, “How We Survive”.
  • December 29: There are laws around data collection, kids’ privacy, and online learning – but some are lifted when there is an emergency, and many school districts and teachers aren’t aware of the laws.  What does that mean for data collection around our kids, as many learn in a virtual classroom? Our guest is Amelia Vance, Director of Youth and Education Privacy at the non-profit Future of Privacy Forum.
  • December 30: As millions of students are asked to learn from home, there’s been an enrollment spike in for-profit virtual schools. Our guest is Jennifer King Rice, a professor of education at the University of Maryland.
  • December 31: The FCC is spending billions to increase broadband availability but is relying on faulty maps. We’ll talk with our guest Nicol Turner Lee of Brookings about broadband speeds, access and how little we really know about coverage.
  • January 1: Bill Gates, on the role of his foundation in deciding what gets funded.

The Daily

Over the holiday season, from December 24 – January 1, The Daily will feature a series of encore episodes that look back over some of the most compelling stories from this past year. Please note that many of these episodes have been updated to keep the content current or to share new information, and all are subject to change based on breaking news.

Classical

Performance Today

  • January 1: Listeners will hear “Dance of the Hours” played by the U.S. Marine Band and the most anticipated New Year’s musical debut perhaps ever… of 1879. Violinist Julia Fischer performs the Brahms Violin Concerto which debuted in a big, splashy concert event on New Year’s Day in 1879.

Arts and Culture

NEW: Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes you back to the sounds of a specific year with a carefully curated list of the best songs. Plus, he’ll invite you to reexamine some deeper cuts as we look back on what happened that year in music, pop culture and the world.

January 1: 1989

  • The year that the Berlin Wall Came Down & Neil Young was Rocking in the Free World. Veteran artist like Tom Petty, Lou Reed and Bonnie Raitt all had big albums, the B-52’s and Fine Young Cannibals both issued their most successful works, and there was hip-hop albums from De La Soul and Beastie Boys. Madonna and Janet Jackson had big selling albums, new alternative bands were emerging like Pixies and Nirvana – who dropped its debut – and across the pond the Manchester scene was buzzing with the debut from Stone Roses. Outside the world of music, a massive earthquake hit the San Francisco Bay area minutes before the World Series between the Giants and A’s. The largest oil spill in U.S. history occurred after the Exxon Valdez strikes Bligh Reef in Alaska’s Prince William Sound, the Bad Boys of Detroit swept the Lakers for the NBA title, and both Seinfeld and The Simpsons began long, successful runs.

The Splendid Table

As The Splendid Table continues to take listener home cooking questions, please follow the program’s updates on Twitter and encourage listeners to send in their questions as voice memos to contact@splendidtable.org, or via phone at 800-537-5252.

Encore episode – January 1:

  • We’re spending an hour with one of the great champions of Southern foodways, award-winning chef Sean Brock. Raised in rural Virginia, Sean has spent 20 years highlighting the unique culinary characteristics of the South. He is the author of the bestselling book Heritage and his latest book, South.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

What’s coming up from APM December 21-27

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.

News

Marketplace

Week of December 21

Marketplace (PM)

  • Kai talks with Kathy Baughman-McLeod, SVP and director of the Adrienne Arsht-Rockefeller Foundation at the Atlantic Council about coral reef insurance and climate risk more broadly.
  • Kai talks to Tawney Brunsch, executive director of the Lakota Funds in Kyle, SD, about the economy and credit desert on the Pine Ridge Reservation. 

Marketplace Tech

  • December 21: Shopify. Facebook Shop. Etsy. There are lots of ways to take a small business online. How are these platforms competing for brick-and-mortar retailers?
  • December 24: AI-based tools like computer vision and voice interfaces have the potential to be life-changing for people with disabilities, but the truth is those AI models are usually built with very little data sourced from those people. Now, Microsoft has a new initiative to fill the data desert.

The Daily

Over the holiday season, from December 24 – January 1, The Daily will feature a series of encore episodes that look back over some of the most compelling stories from this past year. Please note that many of these episodes have been updated to keep the content current or to share new information, and all are subject to change based on breaking news.

  • December 21: A profile of radio star Delilah Rene, and the power of pop music
  • December 22: The Year in Good News – celebrating the personal milestones and little victories of a difficult year
  • December 23: The Lives They Lived – reflecting on some of the lives lost in 2020
  • December 24: The Song that Found Me (encore)
  • December 25: The Long Distance Chorus (encore)

Classical

Performance Today

  • December 21: Performance Today will spend an hour reflecting on those who have died in 2020.  We’ll hear from performers Ryan Anthony, Julian Bream and Leon Fleisher who passed away in 2020, and we’ll broadcast highlights from Maurice Durufle’s Requiem to honor the over 300,000 Americans who have died from COVID-19.
  • December 22: Fred Child spends the hour doing a dramatic retelling—with music—of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.
  • December 24 and 25: Features of Performance Today staff’s favorite performance of Christmas carols. Audiences will hear reflective and somber music on Dec. 24, with sparkly, joyous pieces on Dec. 25.

Arts and Culture

NEW: Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes you back to the sounds of a specific year with a carefully curated list of the best songs. Plus, he’ll invite you to reexamine some deeper cuts as we look back on what happened that year in music, pop culture and the world.

December 25: 1964

  • The British invasion was in full swing as bands like the Beatles, The Rolling Stones and The Who ruled the airwaves. The sound of young America was happening on the Motown label in Detroit with hits from The Supremes, The Temptations & Four Tops. There were girl groups like Dixie Cups and Ronettes, Phil Spector’s “wall of sound” production was featured on several hits. Outside the world of music, The Warren Commission said Oswald acted alone in the killing of JFK, LBJ defeats Goldwater in a landslide in the run for Presidency, and the US Surgeon General links smoking to cancer. Pitcher Bob Gibson dominated baseball and his St. Louis Cardinals defeated the Yankees to win the World Series, where Gibson was the MVP. If you went to the movies you probably saw a James Bond film, there were two James Bond releases in the same year, Goldfinger & From Russia With Love both staring the late Sean Connery.

The Splendid Table

As The Splendid Table continues to take listener home cooking questions, please follow the program’s updates on Twitter and encourage listeners to send in their questions as voice memos to contact@splendidtable.org, or via phone at 800-537-5252.

Encore episode – December 25:

  • We’re getting ready for the holidays with Toni Tipton-Martin, author of Jubilee: Recipes from Two Generations of African American Cooking.
  • We get some insights on entertaining from Questlove, his new book is Mix-Tape Pot-Luck Cookbook.
  • And Melissa Clark re-unites with pastry wizard, Claudia Fleming about the classic book they penned together nearly 20 years ago, The Last Course.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.