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Announcement — Tim de Faramond appointed as the new Editor of BBC Newshour | March 11, 2022

Tim de Faramond

We are pleased to announce that Tim de Faramond will be the new Editor of Newshour starting April 8, 2022.

Tim is currently a Front Page Editor for the international editions of the BBC News website, and has worked with BBC Minute, Today and Outside Source on TV and Radio. After a competitive set of interviews, Tim set out a clear vision for how to build on the programme’s great editorial strengths and deliver greater impact with audiences across all platforms.

“I’m delighted to welcome Tim de Faramond to this role,” shared Jon Zilkha, Controller, BBC WSE. “Newshour is carried on more than 350 US public radio stations and we know how important the program is for US audiences. We look forward to continuing to develop that service under Tim’s leadership and using his digital expertise on behalf of Newshour. As we continue to work with our partners at APM, Tim’s background and vision are well-aligned with our shared goals of reaching younger listeners and engaging all listeners on more platforms.”

“I’m honoured to return to Newshour, where I got my first ever job as a journalist, to work with one of the best teams in the business,” said Tim. “The programme’s coverage of the invasion of Ukraine has been unparalleled, and a reminder of the importance of the team’s work trying to make sense of the world every day. I look forward to empowering our journalists to keep asking the tough questions, uncovering the facts where they are obscured, and bringing you the best reporting from across the BBC. I’m a passionate believer in the power of radio and its place in today’s world to connect us, pull us out of our echo chambers and help us understand people and places we will never visit. For these reasons, Newshour is and should remain, an unmissable listen.”

Tim will fill the role currently held by Jo Floto. As previously announced, Jo has accepted a new role within the BBC as Middle East Bureau Chief and will be ending his tenure with Newshour at the end of March.

Please join us in re-welcoming Tim to Newshour!

Featured post

Announcement — Sabrina Tavernise Joins “The Daily” as a Host | March 3, 2022

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past week, Sabrina Tavernise has brought listeners of “The Daily” inside the Ukraine crisis with a steady string of urgent dispatches from the front lines. Drawing on her fluent Russian and her experience covering previous conflicts in Ukraine, as well as her years reporting in Russia, Sabrina has made the upheaval of war feel visceral and real. She has interviewed civilians receiving guns and mothers sheltering in subway tunnels. With tireless dedication, she has helped maintain “The Daily” as a home for the world’s best audio journalism, a magnet for innovation and essential listening for millions of people. 

Her reporting in Ukraine is only the latest example of her successful collaborations with the audio team, which stretch back to the early days of “The Daily” and include reporting trips across the country, from Baltimore to Oklahoma, as well as weeks spent filling in for Michael Barbaro in the host’s chair. 

All of that is why we are thrilled to announce that Sabrina will become the second host of “The Daily,” sharing hosting duties with Michael. They will take the reins on different episodes each week and allow the show to further its ambitions and reach.

Having a second host will make “The Daily” even stronger. It will allow both Michael and Sabrina to dig deeper into stories and share responsibility for The Times’s flagship show, which — as Michael himself has told us— has grown too big for one person.

It’s hard to imagine someone better suited than Sabrina. She’s an exemplary Times journalist who shares Michael’s depth and breadth of reporting experience, passion for storytelling and deep commitment to the medium of audio. Since joining The Times in 2000, she has covered major stories, from the war in Iraq to the battles over abortion to the Jan. 6 insurrection.

Sabrina has already worked on many successful projects on “The Daily,” including The Battle for Missouri, The Abortion Wars, Roe v. Wade Part One and Part Two and a five-part series on race and policing in Baltimore. Prior to her work in audio, Sabrina spent 10 years as a foreign correspondent, based in Russia, Pakistan and Turkey, where she was the Istanbul bureau chief. 

“I’m thrilled that Sabrina is joining me as a host and a full-time member of ‘The Daily’ family,” said Michael. “My admiration for her began a decade ago as a reader, when I marveled at the creativity and humanity of her journalism. When we started ‘The Daily,’ that admiration deepened as I watched her adapt those same skills to audio to create some of the most distinctive episodes we’ve ever run. Her nose for news, empathy, fair-mindedness and collegiality will all make her a fantastic host and partner.”

Sabrina is joining a show with big ambitions and enormous reach. In just the past year, more than 130 journalists have appeared as guests on the show, including a number of exemplary guest hosts. Since the show launched five years ago, “The Daily” has been downloaded more than three billion times. It’s carried on 265 public radio stations in the U.S. through our partnership with American Public Media. It has built an original music library of 230 compositions, has won a duPont Award and has been part of two Pulitzer Prize-winning lines of coverage, appeared on countless best-of lists and remains the most-listened-to news podcast in the country. 

“I fell in love with audio when I first worked with ‘The Daily’ and its brilliant creators a few years ago,” said Sabrina. “The emotional power of hearing people’s voices — and the music and the drums — took storytelling to a whole new level. I felt like I was suddenly seeing colors, after a lifetime in black and white. I am so excited at the thought of joining this incredible team.”

We’ll give the final word to our listeners. Here’s one from Biddeford, Maine: “It’s easy to think of events like the invasion of Ukraine as something that is happening far away and that has little to do with us here safe in the U.S.  Through her exceptional reporting, Sabrina makes this harder to do.”

Dean Baquet, Lisa Chow, Sam Dolnick and Paula Szuchman

Your week at a glance: February 6 – 12, 2023

Below you will find the latest upcoming program updates for the week ahead. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace


Marketplace (PM)

Week of February 6

  • Kai talks to Meredith Bagby about her book, The New Guys: The Historic Class of Astronauts that Broke Barriers and Changed the Face of Space Travel.
  • Directors, producers and actors have gotten used to an unappreciated boon from the streaming world: Unlike linear TV, your work lives on a platform well past the last episode’s air date, possibly forever. But recent cost-cutting moves from streaming platforms like HBO Max and Showtime have led entire shows to be “disappeared” from the platform. Marketplace’s Matt Levin reports.

Marketplace Tech

Meghan McCarty Carino hosts all week.

  • Feb 6: We’ll feature a 2022 lookback AND look forward on the state of the companies that advertised during last year’s Super Bowl – among the most high profile being FTX. We’ll bring on Jacob Silverman, book author and journalist for a conversation about companies in the ecosystem, and we’ll get a visceral sense of how much has changed in just a year.
  • Feb 7: A story about how laid off tech workers who now have to search for other work could face entirely different workplace cultures in the transition. What does it mean for your identity to go from the tech industry with its fridge freebies, art installations and slickly designed conference rooms, to a more traditional work environment?
  • Feb 8: We’ll have Marketplace’s Stephanie Hughes on the show, talking about how school districts are grappling with the rise of Chat GPT as students use the AI tool to write papers, craft quiz answers, and more.

On Point

  • Feb 6: One in five Americans live in multigenerational households — grandparents with grandchildren, adult children with their parents. That’s a remarkable change from a few generations ago. We explore why more and more Americans live in multigenerational housing.
  • Feb 7: The Taliban promised they would honor Afghan women’s rights. Instead, they have banned women from universities, even required covering the faces of female mannequins. We find out what life is like for Afghan women now.
  • Feb 8: Florida governor Ron DeSantis has made changes to public education a cornerstone of his policy agenda. We investigate how legislation is changing classrooms, featuring an in-depth interview with a Florida school superintendent.

Arts and Culture

The Splendid Table

February 10

  • We’re getting inspiration for the winter kitchen this week! Francis will be taking your cooking questions with Hetty McKinnon, author of To Asia With Love, and chef Amanda Cohen of the vegetable-focused restaurant, Dirt Candy, in New York City. (Rebroadcast)

Classical 24


Beginning February 2, the Rhapsody in Black feature will have a new host, Vernon Neal. Vernon brings with him a passion for music and a commitment to building community and uplifting underrepresented groups. We are thrilled to have him host this weekly feature.

Performance Today

  • David Korevaar performs Florence Price’s Sonata in E minor.
  • Imani Winds performs Jason Moran’s “Cane” at Chamber Music Northwest in Portland.
  • Camarata Pacifica performs Beethoven’s “Archduke” Trio.
  • Catalyst Quartet performs Libby Larsen’s “Sorrow Song and Jubilee.”
  • James Ehnes performs Samuel Barber’s Violin Concerto at the Grand Teton Music Festival.
  • Simin Ganatra and John Novacek perform Charles Cameron White’s Levee Dance Op. 6, No. 2 at Music in the Vineyards Festival, in Napa, CA.
  • We explore a new recording of William Walton’s Facades with JoAnn Falletta, conducting Virginia Arts Festival Chamber Players.
  • Dorian Wind Quintet performs Elliott Carter’s Wind Quintet at the Skaneateles Festival.

Timely Selections

Shareable video of the week


All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and explore the library of videos!

Need some additional assistance to learn how to utilize these videos? Please contact your station relations representative.

People Fixing The World: The dads spreading love to stop fights in school

dads on duty

  • Description: Dads on Duty are a team of fathers who patrol Southwood High School in Shreveport, Louisiana. They got together after more than twenty students had been arrested for fighting. With a friendly face and a few dad jokes they’ve helped to reduce the level of violence. For more positive solutions, download the People Fixing the World podcast Reporter/producer: Ben Wyatt Camera: Lisa Janae
  • Suggested social copy: Dads on Duty are a team of fathers who patrol Southwood High School in Shreveport, Louisiana.
  • Duration: 2 minutes 38 seconds

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

APM Presents special of the week

How We Survive: The Rising Sea

Broadcast Window: Feb 1 – Apr 30, 2023

Length: One hour

The climate crisis is here. Time is slipping away to stop the worst effects of global warming, and the world is looking for solutions. In “How We Survive: The Rising Sea,” Amy Scott follows the money to the end of the world. In this case, South Florida. Miami is one of the most vulnerable coastal cities in the world because of climate change. Billions of dollars are pouring into the region to help it adapt to hotter temperatures, fierce storms and rising waters. But will it be enough? Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

A Word from The Daily | January 31, 2023

Dear Colleagues,

Happy New Year! We hope you’ve enjoyed the winter holidays with your friends and family.

As we’re jumping into 2023, we’d like to give you a rundown of what we’ve been up to these past few weeks.

Our Special Holiday Episode: Talking Turkey

Recognizing one of the most daunting Thanksgiving tasks, cooking a turkey, The Daily released a special episode dedicated to the notoriously difficult bird. Kim Serverson, a food correspondent for The New York Times, takes us through some historical tips, tricks, and gimmicks that have attempted to make the annual exercise easier. The episode ends with Food Columnist J. Kenji López-Alt’s “foolproof” secret for cooking a turkey, which involves a dry-brine and mayo-rub.

A Tribute to Child Victims of Gun Violence

In recent years, gun violence has become the leading cause of death for American children. The New York Times Magazine devoted its end-of-year issue, which traditionally focuses on those who have died in the past year, to these victims.

With this harrowing reporting, The Daily released an episode honoring three lives that were taken far too soon: Shiway Barry, Elijah Gomez, and Lavonte’e Williams. Their stories are told not through their deaths, but through the lives that they lived.

The New York Times Magazine writers and contributors read their essays and shared snippets of interviews with loved ones and family. The essay on Shiway Barry was read by Susan Dominus and features the voice of Cheese, Shiway’s best friend. The essay on Elijah Gomez was read by Dwayne Betts and features the voices of Elijah’s Aunt, Crystal Cathcart, and mother, Jennifer Cathcart. Lastly, the essay on LaVonte’e Williams was read by Linda Villarosa and features the voices of LaVonte’e ‘s mother, Miracle Jones, and grandparents Michael and Tanika Jone.

Each of these stories offer a glimpse into the passions, interests, and personalities of the children. From an environmental cleanup dedication to a friendship forged inside a video game, this episode holds intimate memories of the three victims and reminds listeners how grave the issue of gun violence is to our nation.

Until next time,

-The Daily Team

Your week at a glance: Jan 30 – Feb 5, 2023

Below you will find the latest upcoming program updates for the week ahead. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

Week of January 30

  • Kai explains what it means when firms forecast a recession in 2023 — what data do they look at…how do they factor in economic trends and history.

Marketplace Tech

  • Jan 30: The federal government wants to increase the number of public charging stations for electric cars tenfold by the end of the decade. It’s part of the Biden Administration’s a larger plan to decarbonize the transportation sector by the year 2050. We’ll take a look at how rural areas fit into the broader electrification plan.
  • Feb 1: Laid off tech workers who now have to search for other work could face entirely different workplace cultures in the transition. What does it mean for your identity to go from the tech industry with its fridge freebies, art installations and slickly designed conference rooms, to a more traditional work environment? Meghan McCarty Carino takes a look.
  • Feb 2: We’ll speak with journalist and book author Jacob Silverman with a lookback at the crypto ads in the 2022 Super Bowl and given the crypto crashes and scandals of the past 12 months– where those companies are now.

On Point

  • Jan 30: In 1985 scientists raised the alarm. A group of chemicals known as chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs were destroying the ozone layer – essential for protecting the planet from harmful ultraviolet radiation from the sun. Even though CFCs were widely used in everyday products action was swift. Just two years later the world came together to pass the Montreal Protocol, banning CFCs. And now a UN backed report has confirmed that initiative is working. On Point speaks with those involved in that effort and asks if there are lessons from forty years ago in how we could be tackling climate change now.
  • Feb 2: On Point asks what tech platforms and lawmakers could and should be doing to combat the increasing amount of child sexual abuse material being found on line. One child abuse prosecutor we have spoken with calls it ‘an epidemic’.

BBC World Service

  • Program Change: Because this series contains adult themes and strong language, Love Janessa will NOT broadcast in the usual The Documentary (Wednesday) APM broadcast but will be available to interested stations on the BBC Media Partners site as an 8-part series of half-hour episodes.

    Love Janessa– Behind every catfish, there’s a bait. Who is Janessa Brazil? Stolen images of an adult entertainment star are being used to con victims out of thousands of dollars, breaking hearts in the process. Journalist Hannah Ajala embarks on a quest to find Janessa, in this 8-part true crime series. And who is responsible for catfishing scams?

Arts and Culture

The Splendid Table

February 3

  • We are diving into the local food scene in Hawai‘i with a show we recorded with Hawai‘i Public Radio. Guests include chef Sheldon Simeon of Tin Roof Maui , chef Robynne Mai‘i of Fête, Emma Bello of Sweet Land Farm, Christopher Kanemura of Fujiya Hawai‘i, chef Ed Kenney of public television’s Family Ingredients, Jayna Omaye, Hawai‘i Public Radio’s culture and arts reporter and Kevin Yim, VP of Marketing & Communications for Zippy’s Restaurants.

Performance Today

  • Gabriela Montero performs Sergei Rachmaninoff’s Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 36.
  • A performance from the Lakes Festival in Brainerd, MN of Erich Wolfgang Korngold’s Piano Quintet in E Major, Op. 15.
  • William Wolfram performing Franz Liszt’s Dante Sonata from the Colorado College Summer Music Festival.
  • Karen Gomyo performing Joseph Bologne Chevalier de Saint-Georges’s Concerto in D Major for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 3, No. 1 with Minnesota Orchestra.
  • Roman Rabinovich performs George Walker’s Piano Sonata No. 5 at ChamberFest Cleveland.
  • Excerpt of the Danish String Quartet’s performance of Franz Schubert’s Death and the Maiden at The Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga, TN.

Timely Selections

Shareable video of the week

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and explore the library of videos!

Need some additional assistance to learn how to utilize these videos? Please contact your station relations representative.

People Fixing The World: How eating oysters could help protect the coast

oyster

  • Description: The Louisiana coastal wetlands are being washed away, leaving the region more vulnerable to hurricanes and flooding. Now, restaurants in New Orleans are recycling their oyster shells so they can be used to build sea walls. A video for People Fixing the World by Anna Adams and Richard Kenny.
  • Suggested social copy: With Louisiana’s coastal wetlands washing away, local New Orleans restaurants are using oyster shells to build sea walls.
  • Duration: 1 minute 58 seconds

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

APM Presents special of the week

Witness: Black History Month

Broadcast Window: Feb 1 – Feb 28, 2023

Length: One hour

A special hour-long edition of Witness History from the BBC World Service, bringing together some incredible interviews looking at the African-American experience. Told by people who were there, we hear stories that are fascinating, harrowing, and inspiring.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Your week at a glance: Jan 23-29, 2023

Below you will find the latest upcoming program updates for the week ahead. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace


Marketplace (PM)

Week of January 23

  • What are bankers who work with small businesses hearing from their clients — and what appetite for loans do small businesses have heading into the new year? Marketplace’s Justin Ho reports.
  • Kai talks with Liquid Death CEO Mike Cessario at Liquid Death’s HQ.

Marketplace Tech

  • Jan 23: We’ll have a freelance feature that explores one idea that’s gaining traction in California: putting solar panels on top of exposed water canals. A study last year from UC Merced says it could save 63 billion gallons of water each year (enough to satisfy water needs of 2 million homes) and create 13 megawatts of solar energy (enough to get the state halfway to its 2030 renewable energy targets). Turlock Irrigation district is breaking ground early next year on the state’s first ever pilot project. Los Angeles just voted to essentially copy the idea for the LA Aqueduct. What’s the tech involved?
  • Jan 25: Meghan McCarty Carino speaks with Aniruddh Mohan, a distinguished postdoctoral fellow in the Adlinger Center for Energy and the Environment at Princeton University, to discuss the latest developments and scalability of carbon capture technology.

On Point

  • Jan 23: For the past two years, journalist Chris Whipple has had insider access to the deliberations and operations of the Biden Whitehouse. He chronicles what he saw and heard in his new book, The Fight of His Life. Whipple speaks with host Anthony Brooks, in for Meghna for a few days, about Bidens’s successes, failures, and the challenges ahead.
  • Jan 24: Anthony Brooks hosts.
  • Jan 25: Meghna speaks with the former mayor of Del Rio, Texas, Bruno Lozano. Not only was he the youngest mayor in the city’s history, he’s also its first openly gay one. On the national stage he’s known for calling out his own party, the Democrats, for their handling of the southern border.
  • Jan 26: According to the American Psychological Association, the rate of anxiety among adults in the U.S. quadrupled between 2019 and 2021. And it wasn’t just the pandemic driving that. On Point takes a closer look at anxiety in the U.S. and asks if some level of anxiety can also be good for us.

Arts and Culture

The Splendid Table

January 27

  • We’re spending an hour with Culinary Historian Jessica B. Harris. Jessica has spent much of her life researching the food and foodways of the African Diaspora. She is the author of twelve books including, Iron Pots and Wooden Spoon: Africa’s Gifts to New World Cooking, her memoir, My Soul Looks Back, and High on the Hog: A Culinary Journey from Africa to America. High on the Hog was made into a Netflix documentary in 2021. (Rebroadcast)

Performance Today

  • The Manhattan Chamber Players perform Libby Larsen’s String Quartet No. 4.
  • Anthony McGill and the Pacifica Quartet perform Brahms Clarinet Quartet in b minor
  • World premiere of Edgar Meyer’s Concertino for 14 Strings and Bass with the Scottish Ensemble.
  • Minnesota Orchestra performs Haydn’s Surprise Symphony.
  • St. Lawrence String Quartet performs at Spoleto.
  • Basel Sinfonietta performs Florence Price’s Ethiopia’s Shadow in America conducted by Jessica Horsley.
  • Andrew Joyce performs Elgar’s Cello Concerto with the New Zealand Symphony, conducted by Gemma New.

Timely Selections

Shareable video of the week


All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and explore the library of videos!

Need some additional assistance to learn how to utilize these videos? Please contact your station relations representative.

Wellness: How puppetry can help with trauma

puppetry

  • Description: As a child, Raven Kaliana was trafficked by her own parents. She survived and now works as a puppeteer. Raven wants to show people, through her art, that healing is possible. Her latest show is called Love vs Trauma. Filmed and edited by Britt Yip Produced by Vibeke Venema.
  • Suggested social copy: After Raven Kaliana’s survival from being trafficked, she wants to show how healing is possible through puppetry.
  • Duration: 4 minutes 11 seconds

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

APM Presents special of the week

Justin Holland: The Guitar’s Black Pioneer

Broadcast Window: Jan 1 – Feb 28, 2023

Length: One hour

Justin Holland was a Black guitar virtuoso, educator, and activist in the 19th century who did intricate transcriptions of popular operas, songs, and compositions of his own. Holland was born free and worked to help other enslaved Black people on the Underground Railroad. In this special Professor Ernie Jackson, a Holland expert, talks about his experience as a guitar student and how Holland’s music gave him hope and inspiration. (Rebroadcast from 2022) Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

BBC Monthly: February Docs, Specials and Video Selections | January 19, 2023

Coming in February 2023

Featuring voices from across the U.S. and around the globe, connect your audience to the world with these unique stories and perspectives. This month, we learn about the history of sadness, celebrate World Radio Day, and discover the science behind being hangry. See below for details and more unique stories.

Visit our website to learn more, and find links to ContentDepot for programs, promos and billboards.

As a BBC affiliate, you have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Visit the BBC Media Partner Centre to take advantage of this opportunity and increase your social media presence with consistent, shareable videos centering topics aligned with your audience’s interests.

See below for a curated selection of high-performing videos.


Docs and Specials


*If you would like to request an air window extension, please contact your station representative. Extensions are considered on a case-by-case basis and may be granted subject to rights.

The Documentary: A Short History of Sadness

One hour
Jan 28 – Feb 3, 2023

Author Helen Russell explores humanity’s history of gloom, and the cultural differences in our approach to tackling it.

The Documentary: World Wide Waves ‘23

One hour
Feb 11 – 17, 2023

For World Radio Day on Feb 13 we celebrate the power of radio to change lives through profiles of small community radio stations around the world – from northern Malawi to northern Canada.

The Documentary: No Place Like ‘Nam

One hour
Feb 25 – Mar 3, 2023

March 2023 marks the 50th anniversary of the departure of the last American troops from Vietnam. This programme tells the surprising story of US veterans who’ve since returned to Vietnam and made the country their home. We meet both US and Vietnamese vets and learn about the legacy of the war in the country today.


Monthly BBC Video Selections:

View the instructional guide and social media best practices resource available on our website. Click the links and images below to preview and download these videos.

People Fixing the World: The ‘life-changing’ electric suit


electric suit

  • Description: A special body suit for people with cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and strokes has had some remarkable results. It sends electrical stimulation to muscles which can reduce pain and make movement easier. Join Myra Anubi to find out more.
  • Suggested social copy: A special body suit for people with cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and strokes has had some remarkable results.
  • Duration: 2 minutes 27 seconds

People Fixing the World: The ‘window’ saving families from domestic violence


safety in Iceland

  • Description: Police in Iceland have an innovative approach to tackle domestic violence. They target a 24-hour window after an attack is reported. Maddy Savage learns more about the initiative.     
  • Suggested social copy: How Iceland uses a 24-hour window to tackle domestic violence.
  • Duration: 4 minutes 31 seconds

Health: What is hangry?


hangry

  • Description: Hangry, a term made up of the two words hungry and angry, has been used to describe the irritable feeling as a result of hunger. It was officially recognised as a word by the Oxford English Dictionary in January 2018 but what is the science behind this physiological state?   
  • Suggested social copy: Hangry, a term made up of the two words hungry and angry, has been used to describe the irritable feeling as a result of hunger.
  • Duration: 2 minutes 29 seconds

Your week at a glance: Jan 16-22, 2023

Below you will find the latest upcoming program updates for the week ahead. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace


Marketplace (PM)

Week of January 16

  • In continuation of our Buffalo series, Kai checks in with Johanna Dominguez about how Elmwood small businesses weathered Buffalo’s winter storm during the all-important holiday shopping season.
  • We hear from three real estate agents in three different markets about how the housing market is shifting.
  • After Hurricane Andrew hit south of Miami in 1992, many insurance companies went bust. The industry had to come up with creative ways to spread around risk. And so, the catastrophe bond was created. “Cat bonds” are basically bets that investors make against storms. If no storm hits, they get their money back plus a nice return. If a big storm does hit, they could lose it all. It’s been heralded as the ultimate way to diversify catastrophe risk and a solution to the high cost of insurance. But in a world where more climate catastrophes hit every year, how risky are these bets? Marketplace’s Amy Scott reports.

Marketplace Tech

Meghan McCarty Carino hosts all week.

  • Jan 16: We’ll rebroadcast a feature from Meghan McCarty Carino about unbiased AI used in hiring. AI is commonly used in automated recruitment programs. It helps narrow down a large pool of applicants – using algorithms to match job-seekers to open positions. But there are growing concerns this technology is disproportionately excluding some groups – like women, people of color or those who don’t have college degrees … even when they’re perfectly qualified.
  • Jan 17: A conversation about the technology that powers gas versus electric stoves, and what it might take to transition more households to electric.
  • Jan 20: We’ll feature a conversation with artist Steven Zapata, about what the future holds for artists and artistic copyrights as generative AI art competes in the field.

The Daily

On Point

  • Jan 16: A decade ago, after the Sandy Hook school shooting, Shannon Watts founded the advocacy group Moms Demand Action. It has since grown into one of the largest anti-gun violence groups in the nation and Watts is now a nationally recognized gun safety activist. In conversation with Meghna, Shannon Watts talks about why she has decided to step away from the organizations she founded later this year.
  • Jan 17: The American Academy of Pediatrics has issued new guidance on childhood obesity that calls for much more aggressive intervention than had been recommended for the past fifteen years. On Point looks at why that is and assesses the challenges to its success.
  • Jan 18: We all lie a bit, whether it’s to hide a secret, avoid hurting someone’s feelings, or shirk responsibility. But New York GOP Rep. George Santos appears to be lying about pretty much everything. Why do we lie? And why do some people end up living a lie while others can barely fib?
  • Jan 20: Anthony Brooks hosts.

Arts and Culture

The Splendid Table

January 20

  • This week we are checking in on Lunar New Year celebrations with Andrea Nguyen author of Vietnamese Food Any Day, Simple Recipes for True Fresh Flavors, Hooni Kim, author of My Korea, Traditional Flavors, Modern Recipes and the sister team behind the blog and new book The Woks of Life, Sarah and Kaitlin Leung.

Performance Today

  • Music to honor Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. from Lara Downes, Davone Tines, Cantus, Quinn Mason, Valerie Coleman and the Eastman Philharmonia.
  • Johnny Gandelsman, Michael Nicolas and Conrad Tao perform Arnold Schoenberg’s Verklarte Nacht from the Rockport Opera House in Rockport, Maine.
  • Guitarist Rafael Aguirre performs from Concentus Moraviae in the Czech Republic.
  • Seattle Chamber Music Society presents Tai Murray, Mark Kosower and Stewart Goodyear performing Beethoven’s Trio for Violin, Cello and Piano in E-flat Major.
  • The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center presents an all-star performance of Anton Reicha’s Quintet in D major for Winds.

Timely Selections

Shareable video staff pick


All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and explore the library of videos!

Need some additional assistance to learn how to utilize these videos? Please contact your station relations representative.

People Fixing The World: The app that stops truck drivers falling asleep at the wheel

app for truck drivers

  • Description: Truck drivers in India are using a new app which encourages them to drive safely. HumSafer rewards good driving and tells you if you need a break. For more solutions follow the People Fixing the World podcast. Reporter: Chhavi Sachdev Camera: Rajesh Sharma.
  • Suggested social copy: Truck drivers in India are using a new app which encourages them to drive safely.
  • Duration: 2 minutes 29 seconds

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

APM Presents special staff pick

Higher Ground

Broadcast Window: Jan 18 – Apr 30, 2023

Length: One hour

In this installment, Higher Ground puts the microphone in the hands of a classroom of student scientists as they come to grips with the global crisis in their city. Hosts J.D. Allen and Sabrina Garone explore with them solutions that might give their home the best chance at survival and help save coastal places beyond their city, where millions of people call home. Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Your week at a glance: Jan 9 – 15, 2023

Below you will find the latest upcoming program updates for the week ahead. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace


Marketplace (PM)

Week of January 9

  • Kai talks to Bree Jenkins and Francesca LeBaron about their Conflict Lab course at the UC Berkeley Haas School.
  • China has always been challenging for western firms to do business, but many multinational firms are willing to do it because of the size of the Chinese market and growth potentials … particularly its consumers. But over the past three years, and repeated lockdowns under the zero-COVID policy, consumers are more hesitant. Last November retail sales dropped 5.9%. Ahead of China releasing its economic data for 2022 on January 17th, Jennifer Pak’s look at what’s weighing on consumers’ minds.

Marketplace Tech

  • Jan 9: Kimberly Adams interviews Marketplace’s Matt Levin, about how social media managers are dealing with the changes at Twitter and facing awkward decisions about how and where to promote their content.
  • Jan 11: We’ll feature a conversation with Jordan Taylor with the Human-Computer Interactive Institute about Louisiana’s new law, HB 142, which now requires online users visiting porn websites to provide verification of age by uploading a copy of their digital ID.

On Point

  • Jan 9: According to a recent report, a third of last year’s executions went wrong yet research shows that a majority of Americans still support the death penalty. Some Americans who support the death penalty also think it carries the risk of an innocent person being executed. On Point unpacks support for the death penalty in the US.
  • Jan 11: There’s been a lot of buzz about the new artificial intelligence-powered chatbot, ChatGPT, and the speed with which it can deliver text that mimics human writing. The chatbot has been banned by New York City schools over fears that it could be used to write essays. We look into the ethics of AI language tools and explore safeguards and potential regulation.

Arts and Culture

The Splendid Table

January 13

  • This week, we have a show devoted to mushrooms with Eugenia Bone. She is the editor of the Fantastic Fungi Community Cookbook, and we talk to Anna Lowenhaupt Tsing about the revered matsutake mushroom which she chronicles in her book The Mushroom at the End of the World. (Rebroadcast)

Timely Selections

Shareable video staff pick


All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and explore the library of videos!

Need some additional assistance to learn how to utilize these videos? Please contact your station relations representative.

People Fixing The World: The town giving sober teens free beer

free beer

  • Description: Balen in Belgium noticed more young people getting drunk. So they invented ‘sobercoin’. It encourages people to be more sober – by rewarding them with free drinks. Video by Richard Kenny.
  • Suggested social copy: How Belgium is encouraging sobriety… by rewarding them with free drinks?
  • Duration: 2 minutes 21 seconds

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

APM Presents special staff pick

Justin Holland: The Guitar’s Black Pioneer

Broadcast Window: Jan 1 – Feb 28, 2023

Length: One hour

Justin Holland was a Black guitar virtuoso, educator, and activist in the 19th century who did intricate transcriptions of popular operas, songs, and compositions of his own. Holland was born free and worked to help other enslaved Black people on the Underground Railroad. In this special Professor Ernie Jackson, a Holland expert, talks about his experience as a guitar student and how Holland’s music gave him hope and inspiration. (Rebroadcast from 2022) Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Your week at a glance: Jan 2 – 8, 2023

Below you will find the latest upcoming program updates for the week ahead. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace


Marketplace (PM)

Week of January 2

  • Kai talks with Edgar Dworsky, a consumer protections expert, about his work cataloging shrinkflation for years.
  • A new law will go into effect next year in California aimed at promoting worker-owned businesses. Worker cooperatives and similar models have been found to be beneficial for both workers and businesses, creating a virtuous cycle where workers have a stake in improving the productivity of the business because they’ll get a share in its success. The model could also offer an avenue for succession for the hundreds of thousands of businesses in the state with owners nearing retirement. Marketplace’s Meghan McCarty Carino reports.

Marketplace Tech

  • Jan 2: Tech presents an encore of our show about NFTs and copyright, in a Q with Aram Sinnreich of American University.
  • Jan 3: A conversation between Kimberly Adams and author Karen Levy, on her new book, Data Driven: Truckers, Technology, and the New Workplace Surveillance, about the future of trucking with AI.
  • Jan 4: A conversation between Meghan McCarty Carino and Alexander Rose with the Long Now Foundation, about a 10,000-year clock being built inside a mountain in Texas….a project which is funded by Jeff Bezos.
  • Jan 5: We’ll present a conversation about what comes next for the crypto industry and investors in 2023, in a conversation between McCarty Carino and Unchained podcast host Laura Shin.

Arts and Culture

The Splendid Table

January 6

  • This week, we’re spending an hour with an Indian icon, Raghavan Iyer. Raghavan is the author of many books on Indian food including Betty Crocker’s Indian Home Cooking, The Turmeric Trail and the seminal 660 Curries. Raghavan was once named cooking teacher of the year by the International Association of Culinary Professionals, and he is one of the people who have laid the foundation for the blooming proliferation of wonderful Indian food in the US.

Timely Selections

Shareable video staff pick


All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and explore the library of videos!

Need some additional assistance to learn how to utilize these videos? Please contact your station relations representative.

Wellness: Seoul’s over-65s like disco ‘like medicine’ for seniors

disco

  • Description: A daytime disco for over-65s in the Korean capital Seoul is giving seniors a new lease of life. The event is the first of its kind organised by the local government and aims to tackle loneliness and dementia in the rapidly ageing country. Produced by Olivia Lang and Julie Yoonnyung Lee. Filmed by Youjin Do and Olivia Lang Image: elderly dancers wearing neon, credit BBC.
  • Suggested social copy: A daytime disco for over-65s in the Korean capital Seoul is giving seniors a new lease of life.
  • Duration: 2 minutes 29 seconds

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

APM Presents special staff pick

Sobered: More than Dry January

Broadcast Window: Jan 1 – Feb 28, 2023

Length: One hour

Embodied host Anita Rao examines the tenets and experiences of sober curiosity through a conversation with two people who collectively have close to two decades of sobriety experience. The two reflect on how their sobriety journeys have shaped everything from their romantic and platonic relationships to their careers and thoughts about the future. Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Your week at a glance: Dec 26 – Jan 1

Below you will find the latest upcoming program updates for the week ahead. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace


Marketplace (PM)

Week of December 26

  • Kimberly talks with Karen Levy, a science information professor at Cornell, about the future of transportation and trucking with AI.
  • When people come out of prison, they often have to start over from the ground up. Having a criminal conviction on your record can complicate basic things like finding a job or renting an apartment. Mothers coming out of prison have added challenges– finding childcare and buying formula that is affordable. A program in Indiana is trying to ease the way and make the future better for these women and their children. Alisa Roth reports.

Marketplace Tech

  • Dec 26: A featured conversation with archaeologist Justin Dunnavant, about how tech is speeding up the search for ships—and stories—from the trans-Atlantic slave trade. (Rebroadcast)
  • Dec 27: We’ll have a conversation with Chris Impey, professor of astronomy at the University of Arizona, about a topic that the government hasn’t openly discussed in decades: unidentified flying objects. (Rebroadcast)
  • Dec 28: We’ll encore our summer story about the increase in the number of women protagonists in video games. (Rebroadcast)
  • Dec 29: We’ll revisit our conversation with futurist Amy Webb about the technologies that allow for a more “engineered life.” (Rebroadcast)

On Point

  • Dec 26: More than Money: The Monopoly on Meat – Corporate monopolies, or near monopolies, exercise a lot of power in U.S. markets. They dominate several business sectors like meat processing or entertainment ticket sales. Our special series More than Money kicks off with a conversation about monopolistic practices in meat processing. (Rebroadcast)
  • Dec 27: More than Money: Microsoft and the Big Tech Question – Microsoft has a long-standing bid to buy gaming company Activision-Blizzard for almost $70 billion dollars. It would be just one of Microsoft’s many recent acquisitions. Monopolies have always been defined as one big player in one market. But now, the tech sector has a few giant players, pushing in a lot of markets. In Part Two of our special series More than Money: Are these mega-mergers a new kind of monopoly? (Rebroadcast)
  • Dec 28: More than Money: Antitrust Lessons of the Gilded Age – The nineteenth century saw the rise of great monopolies. In Part Three of our special series More than Money, On Point looks at how Americans pushed back. From President Teddy Roosevelt to journalist Ida Tarbell to Justice Louis Brandeis, we hear about lessons learned from antitrust action in the Gilded Age. (Rebroadcast)
  • Dec 29: More than Money: Defining American Antitrust Law, from Bork to Khan – In 1978 legal scholar Robert Bork wrote a book called The Antitrust Paradox. Bork argued that economic efficiency and “consumer welfare” should be the unique goals of American antitrust law. Now, FTC chair Lina Khan says Bork’s consumer welfare standard is too narrow and wants regulators to ask whether monopolies hurt the welfare of democracies. In Part Four of our special series More than Money: understanding Robert Bork and Lina Khan. (Rebroadcast)
  • Dec 30: More than Money: Solutions for Reigning in Monopoly Power (Original Air Date: 2/18/22) – For antitrust reformers, the size and power of companies like Google and Facebook represent more than a threat to consumer welfare. Can vigorous antitrust regulation meaningfully reduce inequality, and bring about a stronger democracy? In the concluding episode of our special series More than Money, we discuss solutions for reigning in monopoly power. (Rebroadcast)

The Daily

  • Dec 26: On the Road with Ukraine’s Refugees: An Update on the status of refugees in the war.
  • Dec 27: How Two Friends Beat Amazon & Built a Union: A follow-up conversation with the union organizers, Chris & Derrick, on the progress of organizing efforts at Amazon
  • Dec 28: A View of the Beginning of Time: An Update on what the Webb telescope has captured during its time in orbit.
  • Dec 29: A Post-Roe America (originally pts 1 and 2): Follow-up conversations with one anti-abortion activist and one abortion provider we interviewed after the SCOTUS leak to find out what’s happened with them since Roe was officially overturned
  • Dec 30: One Man Flees Putin’s Draft: A follow-up conversation with a man who left Russia to avoid the draft.

Arts and Culture

The Splendid Table

December 30

  • Soup is on this week with award-winning chef Jenn Louis and her new book The Chicken Soup Manifesto. Jenn answers listener questions and brings us her uniquely global take on chicken soup. She’s collected recipes from all over the world, from Algeria to Columbia to Panama. And then, the Splendid Table staff holds a taste-off of store-bought chicken stock. Make sure you tune in to find out who the winner is. (Rebroadcast)

Classical 24

  • Saturday Cinema will not air in the C24 stream on Saturday, Dec 24. Instead, C24 will be broadcasting Christmas music from Dec 23 – 25.

Timely Selections

APM Presents special staff pick

Substance Use & New Paths to Recovery

Broadcast Window: Jan 1 – Feb 28, 2023

Length: One hour

What causes addiction? How do substance use disorders compromise our mental and physical health? And what new treatments are helping people recover from addiction, while making substance use disorders a manageable and treatable condition for those who can access help? Join Call to Mind host Kimberly Adams for a critical hour-long broadcast special exploring substance use disorders in the US. Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Your week at a glance: Dec 19 – 25 and Dec 26 – Jan 1

Below you will find the latest upcoming program updates for the next two weeks in light of the holiday season. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace


Marketplace (PM)

Week of December 19

  • Kai talks with Mohamed El-Erian about Fed policy, the state of the macroeconomy, and recession risks.
  • Kai talks to Avery Trufelman about her new podcast tracking the fashion aesthetic known as American Ivy.

Week of December 26

  • Kimberly talks with Karen Levy, a science information professor at Cornell, about the future of transportation and trucking with AI.
  • When people come out of prison, they often have to start over from the ground up. Having a criminal conviction on your record can complicate basic things like finding a job or renting an apartment. Mothers coming out of prison have added challenges– finding childcare and buying formula that is affordable. A program in Indiana is trying to ease the way and make the future better for these women and their children. Alisa Roth reports.

Marketplace Tech

  • Dec 19: Tech will feature a conversation about an Indigenous approach to AI, with Dr. Noelani Arista, Associate Professor at McGill University.
  • Dec 20: The transgender community has faced unprecedented violence in 2022. We’ll speak with Erin Reed, legislative researcher and activist, about how online misinformation and hate engenders real-world violence against the transgender community– and how this dialogue can lead to anti-trans state legislation.
  • Dec 21: A conversation with Michelle Huang, about her project creating her own “inner child” chatbot using GPT-3, using her childhood journal entries.
  • Dec 26: A featured conversation with archaeologist Justin Dunnavant, about how tech is speeding up the search for ships—and stories—from the trans-Atlantic slave trade. (Rebroadcast)
  • Dec 27: We’ll have a conversation with Chris Impey, professor of astronomy at the University of Arizona, about a topic that the government hasn’t openly discussed in decades: unidentified flying objects. (Rebroadcast)
  • Dec 28: We’ll encore our summer story about the increase in the number of women protagonists in video games. (Rebroadcast)
  • Dec 29: We’ll revisit our conversation with futurist Amy Webb about the technologies that allow for a more “engineered life.” (Rebroadcast)

On Point

  • Dec 19: Meghna speaks with Achut Deng. Originally from Sudan, she now lives in Sioux Falls, South Dakota where she’s raising three children. She thought she was protecting them and preserving their innocence by keeping her own harrowing childhood from them. She never told them how she escaped a bloody civil war — the trauma she suffered and the trauma she survived. But a near-death experience with COVID changed her mind about that and now she has shared her story in a new memoir for young readers, Don’t Look Back. (Episode rescheduled from 12/13 to 12/19 due to weather)
  • Dec 20: A Census Bureau / Bureau of Labor Statistics survey has found that Americans are spending four fewer hours each week with friends than we did a decade ago. While the trend may have been exacerbated by the pandemic, it started well before that. And Americans are not replacing that time with friends with time spent with family or loved ones. They are choosing to be alone. We explore the causes and consequences of that with psychologist and friendship expert, Marisa Franco.
  • Dec 26: More than Money: The Monopoly on Meat – Corporate monopolies, or near monopolies, exercise a lot of power in U.S. markets. They dominate several business sectors like meat processing or entertainment ticket sales. Our special series More than Money kicks off with a conversation about monopolistic practices in meat processing. (Rebroadcast)
  • Dec 27: More than Money: Microsoft and the Big Tech Question – Microsoft has a long-standing bid to buy gaming company Activision-Blizzard for almost $70 billion dollars. It would be just one of Microsoft’s many recent acquisitions. Monopolies have always been defined as one big player in one market. But now, the tech sector has a few giant players, pushing in a lot of markets. In Part Two of our special series More than Money: Are these mega-mergers a new kind of monopoly? (Rebroadcast)
  • Dec 28: More than Money: Antitrust Lessons of the Gilded Age – The nineteenth century saw the rise of great monopolies. In Part Three of our special series More than Money, On Point looks at how Americans pushed back. From President Teddy Roosevelt to journalist Ida Tarbell to Justice Louis Brandeis, we hear about lessons learned from antitrust action in the Gilded Age. (Rebroadcast)
  • Dec 29: More than Money: Defining American Antitrust Law, from Bork to Khan – In 1978 legal scholar Robert Bork wrote a book called The Antitrust Paradox. Bork argued that economic efficiency and “consumer welfare” should be the unique goals of American antitrust law. Now, FTC chair Lina Khan says Bork’s consumer welfare standard is too narrow and wants regulators to ask whether monopolies hurt the welfare of democracies. In Part Four of our special series More than Money: understanding Robert Bork and Lina Khan. (Rebroadcast)
  • Dec 30: More than Money: Solutions for Reigning in Monopoly Power (Original Air Date: 2/18/22) – For antitrust reformers, the size and power of companies like Google and Facebook represent more than a threat to consumer welfare. Can vigorous antitrust regulation meaningfully reduce inequality, and bring about a stronger democracy? In the concluding episode of our special series More than Money, we discuss solutions for reigning in monopoly power. (Rebroadcast)

The Daily

  • Dec 26: On the Road with Ukraine’s Refugees: An Update on the status of refugees in the war.
  • Dec 27: How Two Friends Beat Amazon & Built a Union: A follow-up conversation with the union organizers, Chris & Derrick, on the progress of organizing efforts at Amazon
  • Dec 28: A View of the Beginning of Time: An Update on what the Webb telescope has captured during its time in orbit.
  • Dec 29: A Post-Roe America (originally pts 1 and 2): Follow-up conversations with one anti-abortion activist and one abortion provider we interviewed after the SCOTUS leak to find out what’s happened with them since Roe was officially overturned
  • Dec 30: One Man Flees Putin’s Draft: A follow-up conversation with a man who left Russia to avoid the draft.

Arts and Culture

The Splendid Table

December 23

  • This year, we are digging into the holiday traditions of Puerto Rico with Von Diaz, author of Coconuts & Collards: Recipes and Stories from Puerto Rico to the Deep South. Vallery Lomas, author of Life is What You Bake It joins us to talk celebratory eating and traditions. (Rebroadcast)

December 30

  • Soup is on this week with award-winning chef Jenn Louis and her new book The Chicken Soup Manifesto. Jenn answers listener questions and brings us her uniquely global take on chicken soup. She’s collected recipes from all over the world, from Algeria to Columbia to Panama. And then, the Splendid Table staff holds a taste-off of store-bought chicken stock. Make sure you tune in to find out who the winner is. (Rebroadcast)

Timely Selections

Shareable video staff pick


All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and explore the library of videos!

Need some additional assistance to learn how to utilize these videos? Please contact your station relations representative.

Outliers: Graffiti art transforming Beirut’s neighborhood

graffiti

  • Description: Graffiti is often seen as a blight on a community. But street graffiti artists in Beirut have picked up where international culture has left off to restore pride and colour to one of the city’s toughest neighbourhoods, rebranding it as the Ouzville Project. [Photo: a mural of a child holding a toy gun Credit: BBC]
  • Suggested social copy: Learn how graffiti can restore pride and colour to community.
  • Duration: 2 minutes 12 seconds

APM Presents special staff pick

Selected Shorts: Holidays with Mom

Broadcast Window: Dec 1 – 31, 2022

Length: One hour

Guest host Meg Wolitzer presents our holiday show–two stories about being home for the holidays and how you can count on your Mom to be there for you—and possibly to complicate things. Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.