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Announcement — Tim de Faramond appointed as the new Editor of BBC Newshour | March 11, 2022

Tim de Faramond

We are pleased to announce that Tim de Faramond will be the new Editor of Newshour starting April 8, 2022.

Tim is currently a Front Page Editor for the international editions of the BBC News website, and has worked with BBC Minute, Today and Outside Source on TV and Radio. After a competitive set of interviews, Tim set out a clear vision for how to build on the programme’s great editorial strengths and deliver greater impact with audiences across all platforms.

“I’m delighted to welcome Tim de Faramond to this role,” shared Jon Zilkha, Controller, BBC WSE. “Newshour is carried on more than 350 US public radio stations and we know how important the program is for US audiences. We look forward to continuing to develop that service under Tim’s leadership and using his digital expertise on behalf of Newshour. As we continue to work with our partners at APM, Tim’s background and vision are well-aligned with our shared goals of reaching younger listeners and engaging all listeners on more platforms.”

“I’m honoured to return to Newshour, where I got my first ever job as a journalist, to work with one of the best teams in the business,” said Tim. “The programme’s coverage of the invasion of Ukraine has been unparalleled, and a reminder of the importance of the team’s work trying to make sense of the world every day. I look forward to empowering our journalists to keep asking the tough questions, uncovering the facts where they are obscured, and bringing you the best reporting from across the BBC. I’m a passionate believer in the power of radio and its place in today’s world to connect us, pull us out of our echo chambers and help us understand people and places we will never visit. For these reasons, Newshour is and should remain, an unmissable listen.”

Tim will fill the role currently held by Jo Floto. As previously announced, Jo has accepted a new role within the BBC as Middle East Bureau Chief and will be ending his tenure with Newshour at the end of March.

Please join us in re-welcoming Tim to Newshour!

Featured post

Announcement — Sabrina Tavernise Joins “The Daily” as a Host | March 3, 2022

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past week, Sabrina Tavernise has brought listeners of “The Daily” inside the Ukraine crisis with a steady string of urgent dispatches from the front lines. Drawing on her fluent Russian and her experience covering previous conflicts in Ukraine, as well as her years reporting in Russia, Sabrina has made the upheaval of war feel visceral and real. She has interviewed civilians receiving guns and mothers sheltering in subway tunnels. With tireless dedication, she has helped maintain “The Daily” as a home for the world’s best audio journalism, a magnet for innovation and essential listening for millions of people. 

Her reporting in Ukraine is only the latest example of her successful collaborations with the audio team, which stretch back to the early days of “The Daily” and include reporting trips across the country, from Baltimore to Oklahoma, as well as weeks spent filling in for Michael Barbaro in the host’s chair. 

All of that is why we are thrilled to announce that Sabrina will become the second host of “The Daily,” sharing hosting duties with Michael. They will take the reins on different episodes each week and allow the show to further its ambitions and reach.

Having a second host will make “The Daily” even stronger. It will allow both Michael and Sabrina to dig deeper into stories and share responsibility for The Times’s flagship show, which — as Michael himself has told us— has grown too big for one person.

It’s hard to imagine someone better suited than Sabrina. She’s an exemplary Times journalist who shares Michael’s depth and breadth of reporting experience, passion for storytelling and deep commitment to the medium of audio. Since joining The Times in 2000, she has covered major stories, from the war in Iraq to the battles over abortion to the Jan. 6 insurrection.

Sabrina has already worked on many successful projects on “The Daily,” including The Battle for Missouri, The Abortion Wars, Roe v. Wade Part One and Part Two and a five-part series on race and policing in Baltimore. Prior to her work in audio, Sabrina spent 10 years as a foreign correspondent, based in Russia, Pakistan and Turkey, where she was the Istanbul bureau chief. 

“I’m thrilled that Sabrina is joining me as a host and a full-time member of ‘The Daily’ family,” said Michael. “My admiration for her began a decade ago as a reader, when I marveled at the creativity and humanity of her journalism. When we started ‘The Daily,’ that admiration deepened as I watched her adapt those same skills to audio to create some of the most distinctive episodes we’ve ever run. Her nose for news, empathy, fair-mindedness and collegiality will all make her a fantastic host and partner.”

Sabrina is joining a show with big ambitions and enormous reach. In just the past year, more than 130 journalists have appeared as guests on the show, including a number of exemplary guest hosts. Since the show launched five years ago, “The Daily” has been downloaded more than three billion times. It’s carried on 265 public radio stations in the U.S. through our partnership with American Public Media. It has built an original music library of 230 compositions, has won a duPont Award and has been part of two Pulitzer Prize-winning lines of coverage, appeared on countless best-of lists and remains the most-listened-to news podcast in the country. 

“I fell in love with audio when I first worked with ‘The Daily’ and its brilliant creators a few years ago,” said Sabrina. “The emotional power of hearing people’s voices — and the music and the drums — took storytelling to a whole new level. I felt like I was suddenly seeing colors, after a lifetime in black and white. I am so excited at the thought of joining this incredible team.”

We’ll give the final word to our listeners. Here’s one from Biddeford, Maine: “It’s easy to think of events like the invasion of Ukraine as something that is happening far away and that has little to do with us here safe in the U.S.  Through her exceptional reporting, Sabrina makes this harder to do.”

Dean Baquet, Lisa Chow, Sam Dolnick and Paula Szuchman

Your week at a glance: August 15-21, 2022

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

Week of August 15

  • Kai talks with Harvard researcher Emily Weinstein about her research into technology use by adolescents and new book she co-authored Behind their Screens: What Teens are Facing (and Adults are Missing). This will be published by Aug 16.

Marketplace Tech

  • In the next few days Marketplace Tech will have Levar Burton as a special guest. Kimberly Adams will be speaking with the actor and literacy activist about his new work with Osmo to advance literacy and education using tech. We’ll talk to Burton about how technology can help with literacy, and what lessons he’s learned in his decades-long journey of promoting reading.
  • Aug 15: A story about a weapons detection technology innovation that can quickly identify firearms in a crowd.
  • Aug 16: A conversation about how the FEC has approved Google’s spam filter program for political campaign emails.
  • Aug 18: We’ll hear from the tech creators of an artificial intelligence model that can create realistic images from text commands. One safe street activist who is using the model will share how they utilize the tech to show how streets could become more walkable, bikeable, and community centric.

On Point

  • Aug 15: One year ago today the Taliban seized the Afghan capital Kabul. On Point speaks with a Marine and an Afghan who was his interpreter. They share their story of fighting a war through military red tape, about the interpreter’s escape days after the fall of Kabul and about the cost of two decades of war.
  • Aug 16: Do you think you’re exercising enough? Think again. A new study finds that the previous recommendation of at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity exercise a week might not be enough–and that we actually should be exercising twice as much. On Point explores the latest in exercise science and why you may need to work out more to get the maximum benefit for your health.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Aug 19 – 1992

  • The Time Machine surveys 1992 this time. R.E.M. continued their early 90’s roll with the stellar Automatic For The People album. KD Lang released Ingenue which has become Lang’s best-selling album, so far. Blind Melon song No Rain was everywhere and still is. Thanks to Dr Dre’s The Chronic album, we first learned of Snoop Dog. Tori Amos and the Twin Cities’ band Soul Asylum both had breakout years. There was no sophomore slump for The Black Crowes. Neil Young was in a sentimental mood for his Harvest Moon album. Whitney Houston was everywhere with the film and the soundtrack to The Bodyguard.
  • Beyond the World of Music: Larry Bird retired from The Celtics, meanwhile, Jordan and The Chicago Bulls won another title. Compact discs surpassed cassette tapes as the preferred median for recorded music and Bill Clinton was elected President of the United States. It’s all 1992, our year on this episode of Time Machine from The Current.

The Splendid Table

Repeat episode – August 19

  • This week is devoted to the spicy nightshade, the chili. We have a lesson in chiles rellenos from Bricia Lopez of Guelaguetza Restaurant in Los Angeles. Francis heads to Heatonist in NYC for a taste test of hot sauces, John “Doc” Willoughby introduces us to a delicious ground chili powder from France, Piment d’Espelette and America’s Test Kitchen explains the nuance between the raw and the cooked.
  • Please note, Francis and friends will be taking your culinary questions! Record your question or comment on your phone using your voice memo app and send it to us at contact@splendidtable.org or leave us a voice message at 800-537-5252. Be creative! Record with your friends!

Timely Selections

Shareable video of the week

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and explore the library of videos!

Wellness: Seoul’s over-65s like disco ‘like medicine’ for seniors

disco

  • Description: A daytime disco for over-65s in the Korean capital Seoul is giving seniors a new lease of life. The event is the first of its kind organised by the local government and aims to tackle loneliness and dementia in the rapidly ageing country. Produced by Olivia Lang and Julie Yoonnyung Lee. Filmed by Youjin Do and Olivia Lang Image: elderly dancers wearing neon, credit BBC.
  • Suggested social copy: A daytime disco for over-65s in the Korean capital Seoul is giving seniors a new lease of life.
  • Duration: 2 minutes 29 seconds

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

APM Presents special of the week

Witness History: Virus Outbreaks and Breakthroughs

Broadcast Window: Aug 1 – 30, 2022

Length: One hour

From the Spanish influenza of 1918, to the SARs epidemic of the early 2000s – accounts from people who have suffered from viral diseases and those who have worked to find a cure. We’ll hear first-person accounts of major moments in the battle against infectious disease, as told by the people who were there. Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

BBC Monthly: September Docs, Specials and Video Selections | August 10, 2022

Coming in September 2022

Featuring voices from across the U.S. and around the globe, connect your audience to the world with these unique stories and perspectives. This month, we evaluate the future of Hip Hop, learn about political instability and souring food prices with Pakistani activists and academics, and discover a video that that helps people spot misinformation about Covid-19. See below for details and more unique stories.

Visit our website to learn more, and find links to ContentDepot for programs, promos and billboards.

As a BBC affiliate, you have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Visit the BBC Media Partner Centre to take advantage of this opportunity and increase your social media presence with consistent, shareable videos centering topics aligned with your audience’s interests.

See below for a curated selection of high performing videos.


Docs and Specials

*If you would like to request an air window extension, please contact your station representative. Extensions are considered on a case-by-case basis and may be granted subject to rights.

The Documentary: The Future of Hip Hop

Two one-hour documentaries
Episode 1: Sep 10 – 30, 2022
Episode 2: Sep 17 – Oct 7, 2022

Will Hip Hop be less homophobic and misogynistic in the future? Cakes Da Killa has paved the way as an openly gay rapper and in this two-part series, based in New York and Atlanta, he meets queer artists and females to discuss how far they’ve come – and where they want to go.

World Questions – Pakistan

One hour
Sep 10 – Oct 7, 2022

A panel of young Pakistani activists, academics and journalists answer questions put to them by Pakistani youth across the country and across the world. Political instability, soaring food prices, migration, foreign policy and the role of the army will likely be up for discussion, in a virtual debate hosted by the BBC’s Jonny Dymond.


Monthly BBC Video Selections:

View the instructional guide and social media best practices resource available on our website. Click the links and images below to preview and download these videos.

People Fixing the World: The game that shows people how to spot fake news

  • Description: Researchers at Cambridge University have developed a video game that helps people to spot misinformation about Covid-19. Go Viral! shows players the methods used to spread fake news so they can identify it in future.
  • Suggested social copy: Researchers have developed a game which shows players how fake news is spread.
  • Duration: 2 minute 53 seconds
Fake News



Why is that?: Yeast – An unlikely hero in the fight against climate change?

  • Description: Like us, yeast produce carbon dioxide – but scientists have found a way to modify one species to suck the greenhouse gas out of the air instead. They are now working to scale it up and hope to see huge tanks of yeast built next to factories, so it can capture their carbon dioxide emissions before they enter the atmosphere.
  • Suggested social copy: Scientists in Austria have modified yeast to suck CO2 out of the air.
  • Duration: 2 minutes
yeast



Health: How much should we eat?

  • Description: Keeping a balance diet and eating the right amount of food isn’t always easy, particularly with the temptation of junk food. Some people count calories, others follow a strict meal plan, but is there an easier way to work out how much to eat? Turns out, the answer is in our hands.
  • Suggested social copy: Is there an easy way to work out how much to eat?
  • Duration: 2 minutes 3 seconds
food

Your week at a glance: August 8-14, 2022

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

Week of August 8

  • Companies that do brush-clearing work for property owners are in high demand as wildfire seasons grow longer and stronger in the West. We tag along with one company on the job.
  • The cost of housing has risen significantly in the last year — as have the costs of gas, food, and utilities. All of which means homelessness is on the rise, as well, according to the National Low Income Housing Coalition. Meanwhile, a number of cities and states have been cracking down on homeless people sleeping outside. This summer, Missouri and Tennessee made it a crime to sleep outside on public property (a felony in Tennessee). The state of Missouri can sue city and town governments that don’t enforce the law. Other states are considering similar laws. Marketplace’s Samantha Fields reports.

Marketplace Tech

  • Meghan McCarty Carino and Marielle Segarra split hosting next week. Kimberly Adams is back 8/16.
  • Aug 8: In a conversation with Prof. Josephine Wolff at Tufts University, Tech will ask, “Why is cryptocurrency so hackable?”
  • Aug 10: We’ll hear from a number of experts and voices about the rise of female protagonists in video games, and remaining challenges of representation of women in the gaming space more broadly.
  • Aug 11: A conversation about how an AI tool that maps proteins has been used to help with a malaria vaccine with Matthew Higgins, Prof. of Molecular Parasitology at the University of Oxford.
  • Aug 12: We’ll dig into the pros and cons of AI-driven dynamic pricing, with Prof. Catherine Tucker at MIT.

On Point

  • Aug 9: All 50 states plus Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia have submitted plans for their share of $5 billion for a national network of 500,000 electrical vehicle charging stations. The USDOT has published a framework for what this should look like, creating designated alternative fuel corridors, and proposed minimum standards. What do these proposals tell us about what a network of EV charging stations will look like, how we will scale up to it, and what that will mean for the take up of EV’s in the US?
  • Aug 11: A government investigation has revealed that at the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, meatpacking companies were able to skirt Covid safety regulations with help – from as high as the White House. As a result, tens of thousands of workers got sick, and hundreds died. On Point looks into how meatpacking conglomerated chose profit over protecting their workers and got away with it. This episode was postponed from last week.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Aug 12 – 1974

  • The Time Machine pays a visit to 1974 this time. Dolly Parton made perhaps her best album, which featured two of her greatest songs. Stevie Wonder wrote probably his most political song yet, and its funky toon & he wrote a song for the band Rufus. Barry White pulled double duty with his Love Unlimited Orchestra and his own music. Joni Mitchell recorded her most successful album of her long-storied career. Bob Dylan recorded his final album with the band and stayed “Forever Young.” The Rolling Stones proclaimed, “It’s Only Rock and Roll” & they still liked it! And Bonnie Raitt brought an old John Prine song to the masses.
  • Beyond the World of Music: Richard Nixon became the first president to resign from office. Happy Days began its eleven-year run. There was laughter at movie theatres, with films like Blazing Saddles & Young Frankenstein. It is all 1974, our year on this episode of Time Machine from the Current.

The Splendid Table

Repeat episode – August 12

  • This week we’re looking at one crazy career–catering! Matt and Ted Lee join us with tales from their book Hot Box: Inside Catering, the Food World’s Riskiest Business. Then, America’s Test Kitchen brings us the tools and recipes we need to cook for a real crowd and chef Kwame Onwuachi, author of Notes from a Young Black Chef, swaps catering horror stories with our own Francis.
  • Please note, Francis and friends will be taking your culinary questions! Record your question or comment on your phone using your voice memo app and send it to us at contact@splendidtable.org or leave us a voice message at 800-537-5252. Be creative! Record with your friends!

Timely Selections

Shareable video of the week

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and explore the library of videos!

People Fixing the World: Forests the size of tennis courts

forest the size of a tennis court

  • Description: Hundreds of tiny forests are being planted in towns and cities around the world. The British government has announced funding for 12 of them in the UK. But what’s the point of a forest the size of a tennis court? A film for People Fixing the World by Richard Kenny and Anna Holligan.
  • Suggested social copy: How can a forest the size of a tennis court make an impact?
  • Duration: 3 minutes 1 second

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

APM Presents special of the week

Early Risers: Waking up to Racial Equity in Early Childhood

Broadcast Window: May 25 – Sep 6, 2022

Length: One hour

George Floyd’s death was a tragedy and a wake-up call that sparked a global racial reckoning. And for more than two years, our young children have been watching it all. So how do we help them make sense of what they’re seeing and hearing?

In this one-hour special, listeners will hear practical tips and insights from a variety of early childhood experts about how to talk with very young children about race and racism. Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Your week at a glance: August 1-7, 2022

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

Week of August 1

  • Kai talks with James McCall, Chief Sustainability Officer at HP, at the HP/Sims ink cartridge recycling plant in Lavergne, TN.
  • Marketplace’s Andy Uhler visits West Texas’s Permian Basin to talk to oil companies that are sitting on permits to drill that they haven’t used. What’s the hold up?

Marketplace Tech

  • Marielle Segarra hosts Aug 1, Kimberly Adams on Aug 2, and Meghan McCarty Carino hosts Aug 3-5.
  • Aug 1: Marketplace reporter, Matt Levin investigates Apple’s expansion of its Car Play function with new software that will essentially serve as the operating systems of vehicle… if car manufacturers go for it.
  • Aug 2: A conversation with Brennan Center for Justice’s Rachel Levinson-Waldman, about automated license plate readers, and how law enforcement (and potentially other institutions) can use them to track criminals and others in a post-Roe environment.
  • Aug 3: We will dig into the details of a new Senate proposal that would devote $369 billion to fighting climate change, and how that influx of federal funding could boost climate tech (guest TBD).

On Point

  • Aug 1: Millions of people in the US take daily anti-depressants to regulate the amount of serotonin in their brains. It has been commonly understood by those millions of people that low levels of serotonin, a neurotransmitter, is a leading cause of depression. But a new large-scale review of studies looking at the connection between serotonin levels and depression has made the public aware of something that the scientific community has long known –the connection between serotonin and depression doesn’t exist. On Point explores the ongoing debate over mental health medication and what this review tells us about how we should be treating depression
  • Aug 4: A government investigation has revealed that at the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, meatpacking companies were able to skirt Covid safety regulations with help – from as high as the White House. As a result, tens of thousands of workers got sick, and hundreds died. On Point looks into how meatpacking conglomerated chose profit over protecting their workers and got away with it.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

August 5 – 2000

  • I’m Bill DeVille. The Time Machine heads backward to the year 2000 this time. Y2K went off without a hitch. You probably had no real use for that tub full of water, except for maybe a cold bath! U2 entered the new millennium w/a return to the old U2 sound. Coldplay dropped their debut album, which was all over the radio. Electronic music was gaining steam. Madonna recorded another savvy electronic dance album. Radiohead ditched their guitars in favor of a more electronic sound. Mixmaster Fatboy Slim released another big seller, thanks in part to Christopher Walken. Sade came back strong after an 8-year absence to raise her child. The film and soundtrack to O, Brother Where Art Thou breathed new life into older American sounds.
  • Beyond the world of music: Shaq & Kobe and the LA Lakers win their first NBA title in 12 years. It was the Subway series in New York with the Yankee’s defeating the Mets in 6. The U.S. presidential election was the closest in decades; Ultimately George W. Bush defeated Al Gore. We also learned what a chad and a dimpled ballot actually was. It’s the year 2000 on this episode of Time Machine from the Current.

The Splendid Table

Repeat episode – August 5

  • We are bringing you real-world stories of street vendors and other low-income food entrepreneurs starting their businesses. We visit alums of La Cocina, a groundbreaking kitchen incubator in San Francisco. Then, we look at culinary empowerment from another angle as we head to NYC for a lesson in chiles rellenos from an instructor from The League of Kitchens, an organization of women from around the world who welcome you into their homes and teach you their family recipes.
  • Please note, Francis and friends will be taking your culinary questions! Record your question or comment on your phone using your voice memo app and send it to us at contact@splendidtable.org or leave us a voice message at 800-537-5252. Be creative! Record with your friends!

Timely Selections

Shareable video of the week

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and explore the library of videos!

People Fixing the World: The game that shows people
how to spread fake news

fake news

  • Description: Researchers at Cambridge University have developed a video game that helps people to spot misinformation about Covid-19. Go Viral! shows players the methods used to spread fake news so they can identify it in future. A video for People Fixing the World by Mark Sedgwick.
  • Suggested social copy: The game that helps people spot misinformation about Covid-19.
  • Duration: 2 minutes 53 seconds

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative

APM Presents special of the week

Witness History: Virus Outbreaks and Breakthroughs

Broadcast Window: Aug 1 – 31, 2022

Length: One hour

From the Spanish influenza of 1918, to the SARs epidemic of the early 2000s – accounts from people who have suffered from viral diseases and those who have worked to find a cure. We’ll hear first-person accounts of major moments in the battle against infectious disease, as told by the people who were there. Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Your week at a glance: July 25-31, 2022

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

Week of July 25

  • Kai speaks with Steve Swartz, Hearst CEO.
  • At the end of this month (July 30th), Airbnb is leaving China’s market. It says it will retain some services though, like helping Chinese travelers go abroad. Amazon has also announced it will close its Kindle e-bookstore in June of next year. Our China correspondent Jennifer Pak spoke to Chinese fans who will miss these U-S companies.

Marketplace Tech

  • Kimberly Adams continues to serve as the interim host of Marketplace Tech.
  • July 25: A conversation about STEM summer camp in Illinois with WBEZ’s Susie An. This early-learning opportunity will include classes about robotics and coding for those interested in building their STEM skills. Originally scheduled to air last week, this segment will now air on Monday.
  • July 26: An interview with Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo about the progress of the CHIPS Act, and moving semiconductor manufacturing to the U.S.
  • July 27: A conversation with the Brennan Center for Justice’s Rachel Levinson-Waldman, about automated license plate readers. It’s all about where they’re used, for what purpose, and how they might be used in a post-Roe environment.

On Point

  • July 26: Amanda Ripley has been a journalist for twenty years, and she has a confession to make: For the past few years, she has been avoiding the news for the sake of her mental health. And she’s not alone. According to a recent Reuters Institute survey, the US has one of the highest news avoidance rates in the world. Amanda Ripley joins host Meghna Chakrabarti to talk about what she thinks today’s journalism is missing and how it can be fixed.
  • July 27: Last year a federal judge ordered the Philadelphia Police Department to find ways to reduce racially biased and unconstitutional “stop and frisk” policing. But with violent crime rates at historic levels City Council President, Darrell Clarke, has urged the city look at reviving stop and frisk in a constitutionally compliant way. Mayor Jim Kenney thinks that’s a non-starter. On Point asks, is there such a thing as constitutional stop and frisk? What would that look like?

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

July 29 – 1986

  • The Time Machine pays a visit to 1986 this time. Paul Simon issued his Graceland effort, he later took home the Album of Year Grammy. Things were hoppin’ in Minneapolis. Prince had a big hit, meanwhile his protegee’s Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis produced Janet Jackson’s biggest album yet! Veteran recording artist Peter Gabriel became an MTV darling with his So release. Hip-hop was hitting the mainstream with albums from Beastie Boys and Run-D.M.C., who’s Raising Hell album was the first multimillion selling rap album. There were debuts from Bruce Hornsby and the Range, Crowded House & Steve Earle.
  • Beyond the world of music: The Space Shuttle Challenger exploded 73 seconds after take-off, killing all 7 aboard. Oprah’s talk show debuted. Top Gun was #1 at the box office. Your sport coat or power suit probably included shoulder pads. You may have been sporting parachute or stirrup pants. It’s all 1986 our year on this episode of Time Machine from the Current.

The Splendid Table

New episode – July 29

  • We’re cooking over fire this week with Sarit Packer and Itamar Srulovich authors of Chasing Smoke: Cooking Over Fire Around the Levant. Then, author of Life of Fire and BBQ genius, Pat Martin, joins us to talk about the disappearance of rural BBQ restaurants. And, finally, we get some sassy etiquette advice from the duo behind the award-winning podcast Were you Raised by Wolves, Nick Leighton and Leah Bonnema.
  • Please note, Francis and friends will be taking your culinary questions! Record your question or comment on your phone using your voice memo app and send it to us at contact@splendidtable.org or leave us a voice message at 800-537-5252. Be creative! Record with your friends!

Timely Selections

Shareable video of the week

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and explore the library of videos!

People Fixing the World: Writing a book in a day to get more kids reading

children's books

  • Description: A charity in South Africa is holding hackathons to write children’s books in just 12 hours. Book Dash is trying to tackle low levels of child literacy and it has distributed millions of books. For more innovative solutions listen to the People Fixing the World podcast Reporter – Myra Anubi Producer – Richard Kenny Camera – Wesley Fester.
  • Suggested social copy: A charity in South Africa is holding hackathons to write children’s books in just 12 hours.
  • Duration: 3 minutes 16 seconds

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

APM Presents special of the week

Wondrous Strange

Broadcast Window: July 1 – Aug 5, 2022

Length: One hour

Whether it’s the theremin, the octobass or the contrabass flute, this special will explore instruments that are off the beaten track and the musicians that play them. Audiences will hear commentary about the instruments along with music recordings that showcase their unique sound. Share this fun and quirky hour with your listeners just in time for Uncommon Musical Instrument Day (July 31).

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Your week at a glance: July 18-24, 2022

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

Week of July 18

  • Kai talks with Stephanie Silverman, executive director of the Belcourt Theater, from the United States of Work series.
  • Marketplace’s Meghan McCarty Carino looks at a longstanding but chronically underused “personal” company benefit: Employee Assistance mental health programs. These –even though they are supposed to be confidential — often feel scary for employees to use, as they fear their personal mental health issues could become known to an employer. Before the pandemic utilization of EAP’s was around 10% but many companies increased efforts to encourage benefit uptake over the last couple years.

Marketplace Tech

  • Kimberly Adams continues to serve as the interim host of Marketplace Tech.
  • July 18: A conversation about groundbreaking new pain management technology with researcher and engineer John Rogers who has developed an implant that can cool nerves within the body to relieve pain. It’s early-stage tech but has enormous potential for affecting pain management.
  • July 19: Dr. Anjana Susarla, Dr. Bethany Edmunds from Northeastern University and Dr. Melanie Mitchell from the Santa Fe Institute will explain the difference between machine learning and algorithms, while also breaking down the true meaning behind these widely used terms.
  • July 20: A conversation about a STEM summer camp in Illinois with WBEZ’s Susie An. This early-learning opportunity will include classes about robotics and coding for those interested in building their STEM skills.

On Point

  • Kimberly Atkins Stohr hosts this week while Meghna Chakrabarti is away.
  • July 18: Omicron BA.5 is the new dominant COVID strain in the U.S. People who were infected three months ago are now being reinfected. People who are vaccinated and boosted are getting breakthrough infections. What does that mean for our understanding of how the coronavirus mutates and what we should be doing about it. Marlene Wolfe, Assistant Professor in the Gangarosa Department of Environmental Health at Emory University, is our guest.
  • July 22: On Point looks back at the week’s hearings by the House committee investigating the January 6th attack on Capitol Hill.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

July 22 – 1968

  • The Time Machine visits 1968 this time. It was a banner year for both The Beatles and the Rolling Stones, who both released legendary albums. Jimi Hendrix was still with us and released a masterpiece. Merle Haggard wrote his signature song, which became a huge hit in the country world. Tammy Wynette stood by her man. Simon and Garfunkel’s music was everywhere, including on the radio and at the movie theaters. Etta James made the best album of her career. Desmond Dekker has a big reggae hit. Archie Bell and the Drells taught us a dance called the Tighten Up. The space race was happening. Apollo 8 became the first manned spacecraft to leave earth’s orbit.
  • Beyond the world of music: It was a year full of tragedy. Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy were both assassinated. The Vietnam war was becoming problematic. In lighter news Rowan and Martin’s Laugh In was a popular diversion. It was the top show on TV. It’s all 1968 our year on this episode of Time Machine, from The Current.

The Splendid Table

Repeat episode – July 22

  • This week, we spend the hour with legendary food writer Claudia Roden, one of the foremost authorities on Mediterranean, North African, Spanish, and Sephardic Jewish cooking. Claudia was raised in Cairo and trained as an artist. She was fascinated by the social and historical aspects of the food world and the documentation of lost heritages. She started writing about food in 1968 and has forever changed the way people write and think about what we cook.
  • Please note, Francis and friends will be taking your culinary questions! Record your question or comment on your phone using your voice memo app and send it to us at contact@splendidtable.org or leave us a voice message at 800-537-5252. Be creative! Record with your friends!

Timely Selections

Shareable video of the week

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and explore the library of videos!

A Charmed Life: The Story of Nazar

nazar

  • Description: Since ancient times, sailors have believed that painting a blue eye onto their boats will protect them and ensure a successful voyage. In modern Turkey, fishermen continue this tradition by decorating their boats with the nazar boncuğu , eye shaped talismans made from blue glass. The nazars are used to ward off the evil eye and protect the believer from jealousy and ill will. The history and artistic importance of nazars is explained to us by UNESCO Living Human Treasure Mahmut Sür, who operates a traditional glass forge in the village of Nazarköy, and has just begun to teach women to make nazars for the first time. Series created and produced by Daisy Walsh Series directed and shot by Tom Martienssen, edited by Luke André Jackson of Dustoff Films.
  • Suggested social copy: The history and artistic importance of the nazars.
  • Duration: 7 minutes 7 seconds

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

APM Presents special of the week

Early Risers: Waking up to Racial Equity in Early Childhood

Broadcast Window: May 25 – Sep 6, 2022

Length: One hour

George Floyd’s death was a tragedy and a wake-up call that sparked a global racial reckoning. And for more than two years, our young children have been watching it all. So how do we help them make sense of what they’re seeing and hearing?

In this one-hour special, listeners will hear practical tips and insights from a variety of early childhood experts about how to talk with very young children about race and racism. Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

BBC Monthly: August Docs, Specials and Video Selections | July 13, 2022

Coming in August 2022

Featuring voices from across the U.S. and around the globe, connect your audience to the world with these unique stories and perspectives. This month, we evaluate green transport and the transparency of their supply chains, learn about the wheat industry and how it’s been effected by the war in Ukraine, and discover how Gnanli Landrou has created a far less polluting building material by mixing mud with a special powder. See below for details and more unique stories.

Visit our website to learn more, and find links to ContentDepot for programs, promos and billboards.

As a BBC affiliate, you have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Visit the BBC Media Partner Centre to take advantage of this opportunity and increase your social media presence with consistent, shareable videos centering topics aligned with your audience’s interests.

See below for a curated selection of high performing videos.


Docs and Specials

*If you would like to request an air window extension, please contact your station representative. Extensions are considered on a case-by-case basis and may be granted subject to rights.

Witness History – Viruses and Vaccines

One hour
August 1 – 31, 2022

For the CDC’s ‘National immunisation awareness month’, a special program devoted to viruses and humanity’s battle against them. We’ll hear first-hand accounts from the Flu pandemic of 1918, revisit the SARS epidemic, and meet one of the first people vaccinated as a child against polio – the son of Dr Jonas Salk.

The Compass: Green Energy – Some Inconvenient Truths

Two one-hour documentaries

Episode 1: Transport and Renewables
Aug 17 – Sep 17, 2022

Green transport is crucial to a net zero future, but how transparent are the supply chains bringing the world the components we need, and how green is the electricity we are using to power electric cars anyway? Then, we visit one of the windiest places on earth to hear how locals support green energy – but not when it means the destruction of the local landscape.

Episode 2: Iceland and Finance
Aug 31 – Sep 17, 2022

Iceland produces five times more green energy than its population needs. But what to do with the excess has led to controversy. Then, how is the world going to get to net zero by 2050 and who is paying the bill? Hard choices must be made as we abandon fossil fuels, and every solution to global warming has an impact and unintended consequences.

The Bread Line

One hour
Aug 27 – Sep 16, 2022

From field to bakery, we follow the ‘bread line’ and hear the stories of those in the wheat industry who are winning, and those who are losing, due to the global food crisis sparked by the war in Ukraine.


Monthly BBC Video Selections:

View the instructional guide and social media best practices resource available on our website. Click the links and images below to preview and download these videos.

People Fixing the World: The Man Turning Mud into Eco-Friendly ‘Concrete’

  • Description: Gnanli Landrou has invented a special powder that can turn mud into a solid building material. It’s inspired by houses where he grew up in West Africa. It’s far less polluting than concrete – and it’s about to be used in a new apartment block.
  • Suggested social copy: The man who has invented a special powder that can turn mud into a solid building material.
  • Duration: 3 minute 33 seconds

Gnanli Landrou

Health: Why do we need to sleep well?

  • Description: How much sleep do we need, why are not we getting it, and what effect is that having on us? Here are five ways to make sure you get enough to stay healthy.
  • Suggested social copy: How much sleep do we need, why are not we getting it, and what effect is that having on us?
  • Duration: 2 minutes 22 seconds

sleep

Global Citizen: ‘I sort out piles of human hair’

  • Description: Fry founded the Green Salon Collective which is encouraging sustainability in the hairdressing industry. The collective recycles everything from bleach and dye to people’s actual hair. Video produced by Daniel South, Trystan Young and Jasmin Souesi.
  • Suggested social copy: Fry founded the Green Salon Collective which is encouraging sustainability in the hairdressing industry.
  • Duration: 2 minutes 38 seconds

human hair

2022 BBC Proms Programming | July 12, 2022

For All Stations:

American Public Media is thrilled to showcase the most memorable performances of the 2022 BBC Proms, the U.K.’s annual celebration of classical music. Share up to eight weeks of memorable performances from London’s Royal Albert Hall.

SymphonyCast will broadcast each concert in its entirety, including the last night of Proms. All concerts will follow the standard SymphonyCast clock (1:59).

Hosted by Julie Amacher, these nine programs are available to all APM affiliate stations, free of charge via ContentDepot, regardless of SymphonyCast carriage. These are regular weekly feeds, and open for all Proms concerts.View our detailed list of weekly broadcasts through Friday, Sep 26.

If you would like to carry this programming, please contact your Station Representative.

For BBC Affiliates

The BBC World Service will broadcast seven specially selected highlight programs of Proms concerts, featuring one each week from Saturday, Jul 30 through Friday, Sep 16, with repeats each Sunday. You can view the BBC Proms schedule here.The 2022 season features leading British orchestras as well as international soloists and conductors. Highlights include a performance from the newly formed Ukrainian Freedom Orchestra that showcases the artistry and resilience of Ukrainian musicians, a video games music debut for Proms curated by the young British conductor Robert Ames and the best of South African jazz led by celebrated South African trumpeter and conductor Marcus Wyatt.

NOTE: These programs will be broadcast on the BBC World Service – so news stations will hear this classical music programming during the regular schedule.

These highlight programs make great complements to the full concerts from SymphonyCast and are available for broadcast to all current BBC World Service affiliate stations through APM.

Details and downloads for all seven programs are coming soon to the BBC Media Partner Centre:

  • Broadcast time: Saturdays, 2-3 p.m. ET; repeats Sundays, 7-8 a.m. ET
  • Length: 53 minutes
  • Clock: Proms programs will not follow the BBC World Service clock; there are no breaks at the bottom of the hour.

Questions about BBC Proms programming? Please contact your Station Representative.

Your week at a glance: July 11-17, 2022

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

Week of July 11

  • Access to mental health care in the U.S. should be taking a big step forward on July 16, when 988 becomes a nationwide number to reach suicide-prevention and mental-health assistance counsellors. The trouble is, most of the country isn’t anywhere near ready.

Marketplace Tech

  • Kimberly Adams continues to serve as the interim host of Marketplace Tech.
  • July 11: In the final installment of our credit score series, Kimberly Adams looks at how some borrowers try to game the credit scoring system and the algorithm behind it to score a better score.
  • July 12: A conversation with Cristiano Lima, a reporter with the Washington Post, about the status of digital and data privacy bills in Congress. Politicians have been talking about regulating big tech for years now, but when it comes to actually getting legislation through, so far it’s not happening.
  • July 13: A conversation about groundbreaking new pain management technology with researcher and engineer John Rogers, who has developed an implant that can cool nerves within the body to relieve pain. It’s early-stage tech but has big potential for affecting pain management.

On Point

  • July 11: The suspect in the Highland Park shooting was involved in online communities that celebrate violence and are deeply nihilistic and detached from reality. We explore what and who form these cultures with researchers Alex New House and Emmi Conley. Newhouse says to expect more mass shootings to be inspired by these digital spaces because they are a “mass shooting creation machine.”
  • July 12: In its next term the Supreme Court has agreed to hear a case from North Carolina that argues that state legislatures should have absolute authority over how elections are conducted in a way that could not be over-ruled by state courts. Behind this is something called the independent state legislature theory which has long been dismissed by scholars but appears to have traction with at least four justices on the Supreme Court. On Point looks into what the fact that the justices are willing to take up this case could mean.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

July 15 – 1979

  • The Time Machine pays a visit to 1979 this time. New artists emerged like the Pretenders, Joe Jackson and The B-52’s. Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers released Damn the Torpedoes. It was his first to hit the top 10. English artists like the Clash and Elvis Costello had banner years. Disco was still here, with big songs from Lipps Inc. and Kool and the Gang. It was the year of rap’s first hit by the Sugarhill Gang, who sampled a good chunk of a Chic hit. He was shot dead in Las Vegas less than a year later.
  • Beyond the world of music: There was tragedy in Cincinnati. 11 died at a rock concert by The Who. 52 Americans are taken hostage in the American Embassy in Tehran. Margaret Thatcher was elected Prime minister in the UK. Willie Stargell and the Pittsburgh Pirates won the World Series, defeating the Baltimore Orioles. It was Good times in Pittsburgh, Terry Bradshaw and the The Steelers won the Super Bowl. That film about divorce, Kramer Vs Kramer, was one of the most popular of the year & the Hot gift was the Sony Walkman. It’s all 1979, our year on this episode of Time Machine from The Current.

The Splendid Table

New episode – July 15 – Live from Seattle

  • Seattle has a legendary food scene and we’re taking you there for an event recorded live onstage for KUOW. Guests include bestselling author and newly minted Seattleite J. Kenji López-Alt, Angela Dunleavy, CEO of FareStart, Ruby de Luna, food reporter at KUOW, Kara Martin of the Food Innovation Network and chef Theary Ngeth.
  • Please note, Francis and friends will be taking your culinary questions! Record your question or comment on your phone using your voice memo app and send it to us at contact@splendidtable.org or leave us a voice message at 800-537-5252. Be creative! Record with your friends!

Timely Selections

Shareable video of the week

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and explore the library of videos!

What is willpower and and can we improve it?

willpower

  • Description: How to say no to temptations for the sake of long term goals? Photo: A woman holding an open paper bag, looking at lots of sweets Credit: BBC
  • Suggested social copy: How to say no to temptations for the sake of long term goals?
  • Duration: 2 minutes 7 seconds

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

APM Presents special of the week

Wondrous Strange

Broadcast Window: July 1, 2022 – August 5, 2022

Length: One hour

Whether it’s the theremin, the octobass or the contrabass flute, this special will explore instruments that are off the beaten track and the musicians that play them. Audiences will hear commentary about the instruments along with music recordings that showcase their unique sound. Share this fun and quirky hour with your listeners just in time for Uncommon Musical Instrument Day (July 31).

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Your week at a glance: July 4-10, 2022

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

Marketplace

Marketplace (PM)

Week of July 4

  • Marketplace’s Matt Levin looks at how advertisers used or obscured inflation in the 1970’s. Back then it seems like inflation was a staple of ad campaigns: “Everything else is more expensive, but we’re staying cheap!”
  • A bunch of cities in the US – New York, San Francisco, Minneapolis – are testing temporary funding programs for artists. These aren’t grants for making work. They’re stipends. A sort of universal basic income for musicians, painters and performers. Why are these programs popping up now? Marketplace’s Kristin Schwab reports.

Marketplace Tech

  • Kimberly Adams continues to serve as the interim host of Marketplace Tech.
  • Marketplace Tech continues its series on credit scores and the algorithms behind them.
    • July 4 (encore): A rebroadcast of the Marketplace Tech episode looking at the future of in vitro fertilization in a post-Roe era, with a conversation with a OB-GYN physician and IVF specialist. Dr. Eve Feinberg speaks about how technology has made IVF safer and more affordable, and what barriers the field could face in a world where abortion is no longer legal across the U.S.
    • July 5: Three-digit credit scores are the system we have, but they’re relatively new. In this reported feature, we’ll explore how a confluence of factors – a spike in credit demand after WWII, the increasing computerization of the credit risk profile, the public blowback to computerization of people’s credit records, action from Congress and, the consolidation of credit reporting agencies into the “Big Three” we know today – set a stage for the release of FICO’s eventual three digit credit score released in 1989 and it becoming the standard for credit risk assessment in the 90’s.
    • July 6: People who migrate to the U.S. oftentimes do not have a credit history that follows them from their native country when they get here. Some who come into the U.S. might not even have the proper documentation to start their own credit line. This categorizes them as credit invisible, or under credited – when no credit is reported to the bureaus. Having no credit history affects people – they can’t get credit card offers, and sometimes aren’t able to get a mortgage or health insurance. In this episode, we take a closer look at a fintech company in San Francisco’s Mission District – a neighborhood predominantly populated by undocumented people from Latin America – that helps undocumented credit invisibles create their own credit history.
    • July 7: The credit scoring system is what we have, and likely will have in the foreseeable future. Since so much of our financial lives are shaped by these scores, people have come up with all sorts of ways to get to the number they want or need. In this episode, we hear from people about their stories and strategies for managing their scores.
    • July 8: Credit scores are what we have — but what are the alternatives to using them? Some experts discuss why we haven’t abandoned them entirely, and how alternative data may play a role. We zoom in on one woman’s story of using alternative credit to eventually qualify for a mortgage.

The Daily

July 4 (encore with updated language): The United States is seeing a revival in union membership. In the last eight months, the National Labor Relations Board has recorded a 60 percent increase in workers filing for petitions that allow for union elections to take place. The circumstances that have prompted these unionization efforts have some similarities with the period that brought the largest gain in union membership in U.S. history, during the 1930s. Michael Barbaro speaks with Noam Scheiber about what that era can tell us about today, and whether current efforts are just a blip.

On Point

  • July 4 (encore): On Point revisits our conversation with historian Jon Grinspan. He traveled across the US, talking to the people he met and heard similar observations time and time again; that these times are not normal, and something is broken in our democracy. He told us how you would have heard similar refrains in the late 1800s and how Americans fought for their democracy then.
  • July 5: The Supreme Court has upended 40 years of deference to agencies like the Environmental Protection Agency. They’ve ruled that the EPA can’t aggressively regulate carbon emissions. On Point looks into how the ruling could curb the reach of almost every regulatory agency in the country.
  • July 6: Delta airlines offered anyone traveling the July 4th weekend the opportunity to rebook without any penalty in the that hope travelers will consider changing their plans. No-one is expecting this travel weekend to be any better than previous ones that have seen the cancelation of hundreds of flights. On Point looks into what’s behind these most unfriendly skies.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

July 8 – 1995

  • The Time Machine survey’s 1995 this time. It was a big year for debut albums with releases from Alanis Morissette, Foo Fighters, D’Angelo and Garbage. Brit-pop had a banner year with albums from Oasis, Supergrass and Blur. The alt-country movement was thriving with debuts from both Wilco and Son Volt. No Doubt were selling CD’s like hotcakes. 2Pac dropped his comeback single after being released from prison. He was shot dead in Las Vegas less than a year later.
  • Beyond the world of music: Cal Ripken Jr. breaks Lou Gehrig’s consecutive games played record, one that might never be broken. The Houston Rockets featuring Clyde Drexler & Hakeem Olijuwan swept Orlando for the NBA title. It was the Dallas Cowboys over the Pittsburgh Steelers to win Super Bowl #30. The Trial of the Century begins. ER was the top show on TV. Batman Forever starring Val Kilmer was the top film. It’s all 1995, our year on Time Machine from the Current.

The Splendid Table

Repeat episode – July 8

  • We’re bringing you the regional foods of the Greek Isles this week with Greek food authority Diane Kochilas, award-winning scholar, and author of the classic, The Glorious Foods of Greece.
  • Then we dive into the fascinating and underappreciated world of Greek wine with Tara Q. Thomas, Editor-in-Chief of Wine & Spirits and author of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Wine Basics.
  • Please note, Francis and friends will be taking your culinary questions! Record your question or comment on your phone using your voice memo app and send it to us at contact@splendidtable.org or leave us a voice message at 800-537-5252. Be creative! Record with your friends!

Timely Selections

Shareable video of the week

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and explore the library of videos!

How do we deal with stress?

stress

  • Description: We have all encountered stress in our daily lives. It may come from work, relationship, financial concerns and family. We are apparently more stressed than ever now. Why is that the case? How can we prevent stress from making us sick?
  • Suggested social copy: How can we deal with stress?
  • Duration: 2 minutes 18 seconds

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

APM Presents special of the week

Witness History: Virus Outbreaks and Breakthroughs

Broadcast Window: August 1, 2022 – August 31, 2022

Length: One hour

From the Spanish influenza of 1918, to the SARs epidemic of the early 2000s – accounts from people who have suffered from viral diseases and those who have worked to find a cure. We’ll hear first-person accounts of major moments in the battle against infectious disease, as told by the people who were there.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.