BBC Newshour: Letter from Jo Floto

Dear Public Radio Colleagues –

In the 1500 Eastern edition of Newshour on Friday, February 26th, a man claiming to be Senator Cory Booker was interviewed in what we believe was a deliberate hoax. The deception was detected within minutes and the broadcast was quickly removed from our website. It did not run in the 1600 edition. We apologised to Senator Cory’s office immediately, published a written correction on our site and on last Monday’s 1500 Eastern edition we broadcast an on-air correction.

As the Editor of the programme I can only pass on my sincerest and most heartfelt apologies. The entire team is, as you would expect, completely mortified.

Since the broadcast we have conducted a detailed investigation into what went wrong, and while the coincidence of events that led to this unfortunate mistake is unlikely to repeat itself, we have reviewed our procedures to ensure we eliminate that risk altogether.

I thank you for your continued faith in the programme and we look forward to repaying your trust in us, by delivering the highest quality of programming that you have come to expect from Newshour.

Yours sincerely,

Jo Floto
Editor
BBC Newshour

What’s coming up from APM March 8-14

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.

News

Marketplace

Week of March 8

Marketplace PM

  • March 8: We continue with our microbusiness series, talking to very small business owners about what a year of the pandemic economy has done to them and their businesses. Kai talks to Audrey Hoyt, owner of The Pioneer Collective in Seattle.
  • Kai talks to Lee Isaac Chung, director of Minari.   

Marketplace Tech

  • March 8 (rescheduled from March 4): Airbnb has struggled during the pandemic. But as more people are getting vaccinated and plan to travel again, what is next for the company and its recent office expansion into Atlanta? We’ll talk with CEO Brian Chesky.
  • March 10: China’s Inner Mongolia region will ban cryptocurrency mining in order to reduce emissions. Bitcoin mining requires a LOT of electricity to run special computers and most of China’s energy is still generated from coal. That’s why China dominated cryptocurrency mining for so long – because electricity in developing regions like Inner Mongolia is incredibly cheap. Guest: Jennifer Pak, Marketplace’s China correspondent.   

On Point

  • March 8: From his first week in office, President Biden made clear that his administration is committed to advancing racial equity. But what makes equitable policy goals different from equal ones? Meghna Chakrabarti discusses this question with Georgetown professor Robert Patterson, author of the forthcoming book Black Equity, Black Equality: Reparation and Black Communities.
  • March 9: Israel is implementing a special passport for its vaccinated citizens in an effort to reopen the economy, safely. Is this a model other countries could adopt? Meghna talks with epidemiologists, public health experts and Israeli citizens about the ethical trade-offs of a ‘vaccine passport.’   

Classical

Performance Today

Performance Today will be broadcasting significant works by female composers throughout March in honor of Women’s History Month. Listeners are invited to nominate a living woman who has inspired them for Performance Today’s Classical Woman of the Year Award. Nominees can be composers, conductors, performers, teachers or music supporters. Nominations close March 14 and Fred will announce the winner on the show during the last week of March.

  • March 8: Fred Child will be talking with cellist Yo-Yo Ma and pianist Kathryn Stott about their new album Songs of Comfort, which is intended to be a balm during the tough stretch of the pandemic. They’ll also talk about what it was like performing at the Presidential Inaugural concert.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes you back to the sounds of a specific year with a carefully curated list of the best songs. Plus, he’ll invite you to reexamine some deeper cuts as we look back on what happened that year in music, pop culture and the world.

March 12 – 1969:    

Led Zepplin emerged with two albums and an American tour where the term ‘headbanging’ was coined. The Beatles and the Rolling Stones both dropped stellar albums, David Bowie issued Space Oddity the same year Apollo 11 lands on the moon, Creedence Clearwater Revival and Sly and the Family Stone were both hit machines. Half a million attended Woodstock in Bethel New York, Elvis was still a musical force, English singer Dusty Springfield went to Memphis and recorded a classic, Diana Ross and the Supremes were still together and the top song was Aquarius/Let the Sun Shine In by the 5th Dimension.

On television, The Brady Bunch & Sesame Street debuted, if you went to the movies you probably saw a western, The Amazing Mets won the World Series and Mickey Mantle called it a career.

The Splendid Table

As The Splendid Table continues to take listener home cooking questions, please follow the program’s updates on Twitter and encourage listeners to send in their questions as voice memos to contact@splendidtable.org, or via phone at 800-537-5252.  

Encore episode – March 12: Celebrating books from Spring 2020

  • Saliha Mahmood Ahmed joins us with her book Khazana: A Treasure Trove of Indo-Persian Recipes Inspired by the Mughals.
  • We head deep into the foods of the Louisiana Bayou with chef Melissa M. Martin and her very personal book, The Mosquito Supper Club.
  • We talk to San Francisco chef Bryant Terry about the book Vegetable Kingdom.

Questions? Please Contact your Station Representative

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What’s coming up from APM March 1-7

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.

News

Marketplace

Week of March 1

Marketplace PM

  • Kai has a series of conversations with “micro” businesses across the country – they have a small number of employees and must figure out how to expand. What does growth look like for them? We’ll feature voices from three states: North Carolina, Washington, and Colorado.
  • Marielle Segarra looks at the role of community pharmacies in vaccine distribution with a profile of one community pharmacist.   

Marketplace Tech

  • March 4: Airbnb has struggled during the pandemic. But as more people are getting vaccinated and plan to travel again, what is next for the company and its recent office expansion into Atlanta? We’ll talk with CEO Brian Chesky.

On Point

  • March 1: A third of all COVID deaths in the U.S. have been linked to nursing homes, and nursing homes fear that they will have to close due to pandemic-related costs. Is it time to rethink how nursing homes in the U.S. work? Meghna Chakrabarti talks with long-term care experts, policy makers and health care workers about how we can fix nursing homes in an equitable way.

Classical

Performance Today

Performance Today will be broadcasting significant works by female composers throughout March in honor of Women’s History Month.

  • March 1: Nominations will open for Performance Today’s Classical Woman of the Year Award. Listeners are invited to nominate a living woman who has inspired them. Nominees can be composers, conductors, performers, teachers or music supporters. Nominations close March 14 and Fred will announce the winner on the show during the last week of March.

Pipedreams

  • March 1: Pipedreams is covering Women’s History Month the first week in March, celebrating the artistry of female composers and performers with the episode “Women First.”

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes you back to the sounds of a specific year with a carefully curated list of the best songs. Plus, he’ll invite you to reexamine some deeper cuts as we look back on what happened that year in music, pop culture and the world.

March 5 – 1991:    

It’s the year grunge broke big with albums from Nirvana, Pearl Jam, and Soundgarden, hip-hop groups like De La Soul, A Tribe Called Quest & Cypress Hill were emerging. Metal was still big with two albums from Guns and Roses, and releases from Ozzy Osbourne and Metallica. Red Hot Chili Peppers and U2 released huge albums and the top song of the year was (Everything I do) I do For You by Bryan Adams. Garth Brooks was becoming the rock star of country music, and Queen front man Freddie Mercury died of AIDS.

That same year, outside the world of music, Magic Johnson announced he had HIV, Prince Charles and Lady Dianna split up and CD’s and cassettes were the format of choice – maybe you made mixtapes for friends? Magic Johnson announced he had HIV, Jordan and the Bulls were becoming a dynasty and the Minnesota Twins won their 2nd World Series.

The Splendid Table

As The Splendid Table continues to take listener home cooking questions, please follow the program’s updates on Twitter and encourage listeners to send in their questions as voice memos to contact@splendidtable.org, or via phone at 800-537-5252.  

NEW episode – March 5: Vegetarian Cooking

  • We’ll have a full hour on vegetarian cooking with one of the country’s leading authorities, Chef Deborah Madison. She’s the author 14 books including the classics, The Greens Cookbook, and Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone. Her latest is a memoir, An Onion in My Pocket: My Life with Vegetables.

Questions? Please Contact your Station Representative

Looking for more programming news?

Sign up for our newsletters for the latest updates.
Follow our programs, too! You’ll find social media links on our program pages.

Women’s History Month with APM

APM has specials available to help your station commemorate Women’s History Month. You can find more information at our website, or contact your station representative for more information.

Witness History: Women’s History Month special

March 1 – 30
One hour

Remarkable stories of women’s history, told by the women who were there.

We meet the women who launched an anonymous poster campaign against sexism and racism in the art world in the 1980s, hear the story of a pioneering feminist in Iraq, and consider the impact of The Jane Fonda Workout.

Performance Today: Classical Woman of the Year Award

Performance Today closely tracks the diversity of the artists on our show and compares those statistics with the U.S. population. Three years ago, we realized that the statistically most underrepresented group on Performance Today was women (comparing percent of featured performances broadcast on PT with percentage of women in the U.S. population). There are also very few women in leadership roles in classical music, either in administration or performance.

We decided to create an award to honor the women making a difference in classical music to encourage and inspire other women in music to follow in their footsteps. In 2021 Performance Today will name the third Classical Woman of the Year Award winner. The winner is nominated by listeners and chosen by a committee. This year nominations will be accepted March 1 – 14 on the Performance Today website and an interview with the winner will broadcast by the end of March.


Questions? Contact your station representative for more information.

What’s coming up from APM February 22-28

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.

News

Marketplace

Week of February 22 

Marketplace (PM) 

  • A look at what high inflation looks like in the economy – a historical explainer from Kai.
  • US visas issued to students from China have fallen – by a lot – in part because of the trade war and mostly because of the pandemic. In the last academic year ending in September, the State Department says only 12% of study visas were granted to mainland Chinese students, compared to 30% from the same period for 2019. And there are plenty more students who didn’t even get a chance to apply for US visas. Our China correspondent Jennifer Pak spoke to some of them and sent her report from Shanghai.   

Marketplace Tech

  • February 22: This week, Etsy reports earnings. Hear the origin story of how one woman started her first ever business of any kind, on Etsy, and is now thriving.  
  • February 25: Shopify, the ecommerce platform that helps stores sell their goods online, has grown a lot during the pandemic. But it has also faced increasing competition from others, like Facebook, trying to offer those same services. We speak with Shopify President Harley Finkelstein.       

On Point

  • February 22-23: Boston Globe senior opinion writer Kimberly Atkins hosts the program.    
  • February 24-26: Meghna returns to host the program for the remainder of the week.    

Classical

Performance Today

Performance Today listeners will hear a major musical work composed or performed by a Black artist each hour of the show, every day in the month of February.

The program regularly features BIPOC composers, conductors and performers, but this will be a special celebration of the contribution of Black artists during Black History Month. 

  • February 22: Fred talks with Simone Dinnerstein who decided to record a new album, by herself, in her apartment, during COVID pandemic quarantine last spring. 
  • February 25: An interview with Rapa Nui (Easter Island) pianist Mahani Teave. She has a new album that supports the community music school she operates for kids on Rapa Nui, one of the most remote islands in the Pacific Ocean.  

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes you back to the sounds of a specific year with a carefully curated list of the best songs. Plus, he’ll invite you to reexamine some deeper cuts as we look back on what happened that year in music, pop culture and the world.

February 26 – 1975:      

Classic albums from iconic artists like Bruce Springsteen, Bob Dylan & bands like Led Zeppelin & Pink Floyd, and a 6-minute suite by the band Queen became one of the biggest songs in rock history. The band War celebrated Latino car culture with the song Low Rider, Parliament brought the funk to the party while Fleetwood Mac recorded its first album with new members Stevie Nicks and Lindsay Buckingham and Abba was becoming an international phenomenon.

Outside the world of music, you probably got your first mood ring (remember those?) If you went to the movies you might have caught One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, and thanks to the film Jaws we were all afraid of the water.

The Splendid Table

As The Splendid Table continues to take listener home cooking questions, please follow the program’s updates on Twitter and encourage listeners to send in their questions as voice memos to contact@splendidtable.org, or via phone at 800-537-5252.  

Encore episode – February 19: Food and Marriage   

  • We have an international love story built around Bosnian food with the couple behind Balkan Treat Box in St. Louis.  
  • We get dumpling and relationship advice from a long-time married Uzbek couple, Damira Inatullaeva and Sahib Aminov of the League of Kitchens.    
  • We have a story from writer Michaele Weissman about discovering that the key to understanding her husband is in the rye bread he loves.   
  • We sit down with Washington Post Food and Dining Editor and author of Cool Beans Joe Yonan and his husband Carl Mason to get the real story behind what it’s like to be married to a cookbook author.    

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

2021 Spring Fundraising Tools

It’s that time of year again – spring member drive time. To ease your workload and leverage your audience’s affinity for national programming, utilize our fundraising promos, pitch points and segments. New for Spring 2021, fundraising tools include:

  • New fundraising promo options including general, sustainer, sustainer upgrade and thank you messages from APM hosts. Most are between :20 and :59, mixed or voice only with music beds included for mixing.
  • On Point promos and pitch points.
  • BBC Newshour evergreen segments.
  • The Daily 2 shortened evergreen episodes for use in pledge drives.
  • Performance Today long-form, in studio segments.

All segments are available now on ContentDepot, with exceptions as noted. Subscribe to program pages today and receive all future updates for each program. Visit the ‘Episodes’ section of the pages below to find new fundraisers, with suggested pitch points following each rundown or posted in the promotional materials tab.

Check out the links below, and if you have any questions please reach out to your station relations representative.

News

BBC World Service

Marketplace

  • 7 fundraising promos voiced by Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace Morning Report

  • 5 fundraising promos voiced by David Brancaccio

Marketplace Tech

  • 5 fundraising promos voiced by Molly Wood

The Daily

  • 4 fundraising promos voiced by producers of The Daily and Michael Barbaro
  • 2 shortened evergreen episodes (including promos)

On Point

  • 5 promos voiced by Meghna Chakrabarti

Classical

Performance Today

  • 5 fundraising promos voiced by Fred Child
  • 4 in-studio long segments (10:00-14:00) with guest artists

Pipedreams

  • 6 fundraising promos voiced by Michael Barone

SymphonyCast

  • 5 fundraising promos voiced by Julie Amacher.

Arts & Culture

The Splendid Table

  • 7 fundraising promos voiced by Francis Lam

Questions? Please reach out to your station relations representative.

What’s coming up from APM February 15-21

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.

News

Marketplace

Week of February 15 

Marketplace (PM) 

  • Kai talks with Michael Patrick Smith about his new book The Good Hand: A Memoir of Work, Brotherhood, and Transformation in an American Boomtown.
  • Kai talks with Michael Durant and his younger brother AJ Williams for our ongoing series, United States of Work.  Michael is an accountant and his brother, AJ, is a college senior.  We first profiled them a year ago in February and have checked in with Michael over the last year about his job and family   

Marketplace Tech

  • February 15 (encore story): Moody’s recently acquired a data company that analyses the financial risks of climate changes. We talk with Emily Mazzacurati, founder of 427, about the work they do and how it influences the decisions companies make around investments that could help us adapt. 
  • February 16: Maine’s Colby College announced in January it will be opening an artificial intelligence institute – which it says is the first of its kind at a small liberal arts college. Set to open this fall, the school plans to teach students about AI and machine learning through the lenses of history, gender studies, biology and more. The goal is that eventually every student will need to take courses on artificial intelligence in order to graduate. Guest: David Greene, president, Colby College.      

On Point

Meghna is off, with Anthony Brooks guest hosting February 15-18 and Kimberly Atkins hosting on February 19. 

  • February 15: House managers will argue that the events of January 6 could not have happened without former President Trump. For the first time, we’ll see a Senate impeachment trial for a president already out of office. How is it going to work? 

Classical

Performance Today

Performance Today listeners will hear a major musical work composed or performed by a Black artist each hour of the show, every day in the month of February.

The program regularly features BIPOC composers, conductors and performers, but this will be a special celebration of the contribution of Black artists during Black History Month. 

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes you back to the sounds of a specific year with a carefully curated list of the best songs. Plus, he’ll invite you to reexamine some deeper cuts as we look back on what happened that year in music, pop culture and the world.

February 19 – 1985:     

It was the year that the USA for Africa took a cue from Band Aid & helped feed the world. Whitney Houston emerged with her debut, and it was a big year for music in Minneapolis with albums from The Replacements, Husker Du & Prince. Run DMC released their 2nd effort & became the first rap act to release a CD, Sting dropped his first solo album and the band Dire Straits had it biggest year with their Brothers in Arms album.

The Chicago Bears recorded the Superbowl Shuffle & ultimately won the big game, Pete Rose breaks Ty Cobb’s All-Time Hit Record and Michael J Fox went back to the future. It was the year that new Coke came and went, Larry King Live was launched on CNN, and the first .com was registered while Windows 1.0 was released. 

The Splendid Table

As The Splendid Table continues to take listener home cooking questions, please follow the program’s updates on Twitter and encourage listeners to send in their questions as voice memos to contact@splendidtable.org, or via phone at 800-537-5252.  

NEW episode – February 19:   

  • This week we’re spending the hour with Chinese food authority Grace Young. Grace known to many as the Poet Laureate of the wok has spent years exploring classic Chinese cooking. She is author of the ground-breaking Breath of the Wok and The Wisdom of the Chinese Kitchen. Her latest project is an oral history, Coronavirus: Chinatown Stories. 

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

On Point has a new Executive Producer: Jonathan Dyer joins the show on Feb. 16.

Jonathan Dyer: Executive Producer, On Point

Jonathan was Managing Editor at The World for more than a decade, a key figure in the leadership team overseeing more than 30 journalists in Boston and London. He also created and edited Boston Calling, a weekly BBC World Service broadcast and podcast heard by millions of global listeners.

Before that, Jonathan was part of the senior team that devised and launched The Takeaway. He got his start at the BBC as an engineer and has a keen understanding of every aspect that goes into getting a daily show on the air.

What’s coming up from APM February 8-14

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.

News

BBC World Service

An updated version of the BBC World Service winter schedule will go into effect on Saturday, February 6. There will be minor changes to weekend programming – find the new schedule here.

Marketplace

Week of February 8 

Marketplace (PM) 

  • Kai talks to Nahnatchka Khan, co-creator of the upcoming NBC series Young Rock.
  • Administering the COVID-19 vaccines will be a challenge for retailers. Both require careful refrigeration (especially the Pfizer one, which can only be stored long-term in a special freezer that most pharmacies don’t have). There’s the question of where to actually administer the vaccinations while also keeping people socially distanced. Retailers also have to remind people to come in for their shot twice. All that will be hard enough for the big retail chains like CVS, Walgreens, and Walmart. But small, community pharmacies are going to be a part of the rollout too – and they have even fewer resources to work with. We profile a local community pharmacist.   

Marketplace Tech
 

  • February 8: The FCC launched a program – planned just before the pandemic – to provide Native American tribes with free access to a spectrum capable of broadcasting high-speed wireless connectivity. The FCC unexpectedly received hundreds of applications for the program as tribes prioritized CARES dollars for internet projects. While the spectrum is free, tribes are charged with meeting expensive buildout requirements for the program over the next five years. The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes in northwest Montana are in the midst of a multi-millions-dollar project that will provide high-speed internet to residents on this mostly rural reservation. This project is one of the first stemming from the FCC spectrum program to be built across the country.
  • February 10: There’s a saying that I’m sure you’ve heard: “History is written by the victors.” But what if that history wasn’t a written document, but a smartphone video?  The decisions social media platforms make about how to preserve videos uploaded by users can determine the historical record. It made us wonder: is there any possibility that international standards could emerge about how and what content should be digitally archived? Jay Aronson is the founder and director of the Center for Human Rights Science at Carnegie Mellon and works with organizations around the world to preserve the historical record.     

On Point

Week of February 8

House managers will argue that the events of January 6 could not have happened without former President Trump. For the first time, we’ll see a Senate impeachment trial for a president already out of office. How is it going to work?

Classical

Performance Today

Performance Today listeners will hear a major musical work composed or performed by a Black artist each hour of the show, every day in the month of February.

The program regularly features BIPOC composers, conductors and performers, but this will be a special celebration of the contribution of Black artists during Black History Month. 

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes you back to the sounds of a specific year with a carefully curated list of the best songs. Plus, he’ll invite you to reexamine some deeper cuts as we look back on what happened that year in music, pop culture and the world.

February 12 – 2006:    

The year the world first learned of Amy Winehouse who released her big selling Back to Black album. We were all whistling along to Young Folks by the Swedish trio Peter Bjorn and John, and there were big debuts from across the pond from Lilly Allen and Arctic Monkeys who released the fastest selling debut album in UK chart history. In the states, it was the first album from Hip Hop artist Lupe Fiasco, guitars were still in style with albums from The Hold Steady and The Raconteurs which featured Jack White from The White Stripes.

Outside the world of music, crocodile hunter and Australian TV personality Steve Irwin died after a stingray pierced his heart during filming, you probably watched The Wire on HBO and The Office on network TV, and the Miami Heat won its first NBA championship. 

The Splendid Table

As The Splendid Table continues to take listener home cooking questions, please follow the program’s updates on Twitter and encourage listeners to send in their questions as voice memos to contact@splendidtable.org, or via phone at 800-537-5252.  

Encore episode – February 12: Culture of drinking   

  • We visit restaurateurs Brian and Mark Canlis of Canlis restaurant and gather around their special barrel of whiskey in their secret basement.
  • San Francisco Chronicle wine critic Esther Mobley explains the method and a bit of the madness behind the language of wine.

Brad Thomas Parsons, author of Last Call: Bartenders on Their Final Drink and The Wisdom and Rituals of Closing Time, has stories from the restaurant world’s witching hour – last call.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

What’s coming up from APM February 1-7

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.

News

BBC World Service

An updated version of the BBC World Service winter schedule will go into effect on Saturday, February 6. There will be minor changes to weekend programming – watch for ContentDepot alerts for more details. 

Marketplace

Week of February 1 

Marketplace (PM) 

  • Kai talks with Rueben Miller about his new book Halfway Home: Race Punishment, and the Afterlife of Mass Incarceration.   
     
  • Americans are spending more on energy to power their homes as work has shifted away from offices. New research from Tufts University finds that electricity bills were over $20/month higher on average for utilities serving one fifth of U.S. households during the period from April to July 2020. How are people who have been working from home in the pandemic handling the extra cost? Can folks legitimately expense their energy bills? It’s a sticky situation for some. We’ll talk to home workers and employers.  

Marketplace Tech

  • Beginning February 3: Krissy Clark, host of podcast The Uncertain Hour – which covers our complicated and unequal economy – will answer questions from David and Kai about the podcast’s new season. The discussion will revolve around employment: jobs that are outsourced, subcontracted, freelance, “self-employed,” temporary or “gig” — a decades long trend that has accelerated in recent years. These types of jobs often come without benefits and sometimes offer pay below the minimum wage.
     
  • Our hosts will also look at the history and policy decisions that led us here, how some companies use loopholes to avoid providing workers a minimum wage or basic protections, and what a workforce increasingly made up of “nonemployees” means for the future.   

On Point

Week of February 1

  • February 1: With a 50-50 split in the Senate, Senator Joe Manchin is the man in the middle. How will he wield his power in congress?   
  • February 4: Following rising extremist activity in the U.S., experts have raised concerns about social media platforms’ role in spreading disinformation. The banning of former President Donald Trump on mainstream platforms solidified the concern: do social media platforms have too much power?     

Classical

Performance Today

Performance Today listeners will hear a major musical work composed or performed by a Black artist each hour of the show, every day in the month of February.

The program regularly features BIPOC composers, conductors and performers, but this will be a special celebration of the contribution of Black artists in commemoration of Black History Month. 

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

Time Machine from The Current is a sonic journey across music history. Each week, host Bill DeVille takes you back to the sounds of a specific year with a carefully curated list of the best songs. Plus, he’ll invite you to reexamine some deeper cuts as we look back on what happened that year in music, pop culture and the world.

February 5 – 1961:    

The world was Crazy for Patsy Cline, and Ray Charles and Roy Orbison had the year’s biggest hits. It was also a big year for girl groups like the Marvalettes and Shirells, there was great music coming out of the Big Easy from artists Fats Domino and Lee Dorsey, Del Shannon and Dion rocked the radio while Surf Music was emerging in California with artists like Dick Dale and The Beach Boys, and Elvis Presley was making movies and music.

Outside the world of music, John F. Kennedy was sworn in, Roger Maris hit 61 homers to break Babe Ruth’s single season HR record, the Packers won the NFL Championship and it was the inaugural season for the Minnesota Twins. The street-smart musical West Side story hit the big screen, while on the small screen that show about the talking horse – Mr. Ed – debuted. And if you were around that year, you probably got your first yoyo. 

The Splendid Table

As The Splendid Table continues to take listener home cooking questions, please follow the program’s updates on Twitter and encourage listeners to send in their questions as voice memos to contact@splendidtable.org, or via phone at 800-537-5252.  

NEW episode – February 5: Toast and Coffee  

  • We talk to award-winning baker Cheryl Day of Savannah’s Back in the Day Bakery for breakfast baking inspiration. She is the author of Baking for Breakfast and the classic Back in the Day Bakery Cookbook, and she sticks around to take some of your baking questions.  
     

Then, we turn to Nick Cho, better known as Your Korean Dad on Tik Tok, to talk about his other area of expertise. He is the founder Wrecking Ball Coffee Roasters in San Francisco. 

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.