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Announcement — BBC Newshour Presenter Razia Iqbal | December 14, 2021

Please join us in congratulating BBC Newshour Presenter Razia Iqbal for her upcoming tenure in the Princeton University Program in Journalism’s slate of Visiting Professors. Razia will join a group of distinguished journalists as visiting professors in its acclaimed writing seminars this academic year. Because of this, Razia’s last day of Newshour presenting will be December 30, 2021, with an anticipated return in August 2022. 

James Coomarasamy, in addition to other Newshour presenters, will primarily present the 9:00 and 10:00 ET editions. His bio and photo, along with those of the other presenters, are available at APMDistribution.org. Generic promos are available for your use on ContentDepot or custom requests can be submitted through this online form.  

BBC Monthly: February Docs, Specials and Video Selections

Coming in February 2022

Featuring voices from across the U.S. and around the globe, connect your audience to the world with these unique stories and perspectives. This month, we look into African-American experiences, discover the traditions maintained by community radio, and evaluate companies’ commitment to climate change and how the natural world can bolster space exploration and accessibility. See below for details.

Visit our website to learn more, and find links to ContentDepot for programs, promos and billboards.

As a BBC affiliate, you have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Visit the BBC Media Partner Centre to take advantage of this opportunity and increase your social media presence with consistent, shareable videos centering topics aligned with your audience’s interests.

See below for a curated selection of high performing videos.


Docs and Specials

Witness History: Black History Month

One hour
February 1 – 28, 2022

A special hour-long edition of Witness History, bringing together some incredible interviews looking at the African-American experience. We revisit the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, meet the African American woman who broke barriers in American news, and hear a first-hand account from when Nelson Mandela visited Detroit.

World Wide Waves 22 – The sounds of community radio

One hour
February 12 – 18, 2022

For World Radio Day 2022, we tune in to some more small radio stations around the world that connect communities, spark conversations, and keep traditions alive.

The Climate Question: Can we believe companies’ promises on climate, and what can we do about the world’s melting glaciers?

One hour
February 13 – 19, 2022

Ahead of COP 26, there was a rush of businesses declaring their commitment to “net zero” emissions targets. But how much can we believe in companies’ promises on climate? Then, as the world’s glaciers melt faster than ever, what can we do?


Monthly BBC Video Selections:

View the instructional guide and social media best practices resource available on our website. Please share all BBC videos within two weeks of downloading them on the BBC Media Partner Centre. Click the links and images below to watch and download these videos.

The pink dolphins giving people their lives back

  • Description: Physiotherapist Igor Simões Andrade gives monthly sessions to children with a range of physical and mental disabilities by taking them swimming with wild freshwater pink dolphins in the Amazon. The scheme is supported by the Brazilian government’s environment agencies on the condition that the dolphins are not harmed. For the past 13 years, Mr Andrade has helped more than 600 kids for free, with a range of conditions from Down’s Syndrome to cerebral palsy in the city of Novo Airão on the Rio Negro. Born without arms, Leonardo Araujo began swimming with wild pink dolphins in the Amazon when he was seven. At the time he was unable to walk, but now, aged 21, he just passed his driving test. Filmed by Gibby Zobel Edited by Gibby Zobel and Baya Cat.
  • Suggested social copy: A physiotherapist working with freshwater dolphins in the Amazon river has helped over 600 children.
  • Duration: 2 minutes 57 seconds
Photo credit: BBC.

The link between climate change, seaweed and ice cream

  • Description: Seaweed – we’ve been using it for centuries in food and toiletries. It can help to keep toothpaste and ice cream soft. But in some parts of the world, supply has been affected by climate change. Now people in Zanzibar are learning new methods of farming through the help of outreach projects like Milele Zanzibar Foundation and the Panje Project. A video for People Fixing the World by Celestina Olulode, Esther Namuhisa, and Nicholaus Mtenga.
  • Suggested social copy: Seaweed production has been affected by warming seas – this is how farmers are adapting.
  • Duration: 2 minutes 42 seconds
Photo credit: Celestina Olulode, Esther Namuhisa, and Nicholaus Mtenga.

How lobsters are helping us see into space

  • Description: X-ray space telescopes can be used to study big events, like the formation of black holes. But until recently, their field of vision has been relatively narrow – making it difficult to capture this unexpected activity. By mimicking the way lobsters’ eyes work, scientists around the world have designed new telescopes that can survey much larger areas.
  • Suggested social copy: X-ray space telescopes can survey much larger areas by mimicking lobster vision.
  • Duration: 1 minute 32 seconds
Photo credit: BBC/Jules Bartl.

Your week at a glance: January 17-23

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

BBC World Service

  • Note: Due to challenges from the rise in Covid cases in the UK, the BBC will be on a temporarily revised 2022 winter schedule – substituting the 9 p.m. and 11 p.m. ET editions of The Newsroom – until January 16. Beginning January 17, the World Service will revert back to the original 2022 winter schedule. Find both schedules online.

Marketplace

Week of January 17

Marketplace (PM)

  • Kai takes a virtual shopping trip for masks with Aaron Collins: “the mask nerd.” Collins will help explain how to spot “counterfeit” K and N 95 masks.
  • Job openings in the home building industry are at an all-time high, the rate of people quitting is up sharply as well, and that’s further slowing down and raising the cost of building desperately needed housing. Employers are trying everything they can — poaching from other jobs sites, offering signing and retention bonuses (rare in the industry even a year ago), and of course increasing wages and benefits. Marketplace’s Amy Scott talks to workers who have benefited from the competition and builders trying to compete.

Marketplace Tech

  • Kimberly Adams hosts through January.
  • January 17 (encore): A conversation between Kimberly Adams and Marketplace reporter Savannah Maher on tribal lands’ libraries potentially getting access to the Federal Communications Commission’s E-Rate program and federal subsidies for library broadband. They’ll be considering this proposal later this month on January 27.
  • January 18: Kimberly Adams will speak with Joe Kane, director of broadband and spectrum policy at the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, on the delayed 5G Wi-Fi rollout that’s coming next week.

On Point

  • January 17: The city of Atlanta is closely associated with Martin Luther King and his legacy. But the city is also trying to define its place in the new progressive movement. On this Martin Luther King Jr. Day, we hear how Atlanta is celebrating the civil rights heroes of its past while looking towards its future.
  • January 20: There is confusion and mixed messaging about the transmission of COVID in schools right now. Chicago schools have just reopened after a standoff between the school district and the teachers’ union over COVID safety. Other districts have gone to remote learning, while elsewhere classrooms are still open, but sports are being canceled. However, there is plenty of data to show that schools are not sources of COVID spread. We ask: how should we rethink COVID fear in the classroom?

Classical

Performance Today

  • January 17: Performance Today will feature ensembles that use art to advance social justice, including Tonality, the Sphinx Virtuosi and the Imani Winds, as well as #TakeTwoKnees initiative.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

January 21 – 1982

  • Duran Duran emerged from across the Atlantic with their debut album. Marshall Crenshaw released his rootsy debut, The Clash issued Combat Rock, which became their biggest album in the U.S., and The Go-Go’s dropped their 2nd album. Eddy Grant took us to Electric Avenue, Prince dropped his biggest album yet and was becoming a superstar, and synth-pop was everywhere with big tunes from Wall of Voodoo, Thomas Dolby & Yaz. It was also the year of the “yacht rock” classic “Africa” by Toto.
  • Outside the world of music, ET was the top film and 60 Minutes was the top TV show. The sitcom Cheers hit the small screen, Times’ Man of the Year was ‘The Computer’, and video games, break dancing, moonwalking and Jane Fonda’s Workout videotapes were all the rage.

The Splendid Table

NEW episode – January 21

  • This week, The Splendid Table has a show devoted to mushrooms with Eugenia Bone. She is the editor of the Fantastic Fungi Community Cookbook.

Timely Selections

Digital / Marketing tool from the BBC World Service

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these shareable videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and follow the link below to explore the library of videos!

VIEW VIDEOS HERE

Questions? Reach out to your Station Relations Representative.

Higher Ground

Broadcast Window: January 17, 2022 – April 1, 2022

Length: One hour

Climate change is already here in America’s first suburbs — Long Island. Higher Ground tells the stories of communities on Long Island preparing and adapting to extreme weather and rising tides. J.D. Allen and Sabrina Garone venture across the region to explore the solutions that might give people the best chance at survival and help save the places millions of people call home. These perspectives from Long Island have implications far beyond the region in the search for solutions to survive climate change.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Your week at a glance: January 10-16

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

BBC World Service

  • Note: Due to challenges from the rise in Covid cases in the UK, the BBC is extending the temporarily revised winter schedule until January 16, and the timeline will be re-evaluated next week. The revised schedule includes substitutions for the 9 p.m. and 11 p.m. ET editions of The Newsroom, in addition to other schedule changes. The BBC is aiming to have these editions of The Newsroom back on-air as soon as possible. An updated schedule is available online

Marketplace

Week of January 10

Marketplace (PM)

  • Kai checks back in with Lydia Clarke, owner of DTLA Cheese in Grand Central Market – a microbusiness we followed from the start of the pandemic.

Marketplace Tech

  • Kimberly Adams hosts through January.
  • January 10: Kimberly Adams will speak with CNET editor at large Brian Cooley about this year’s Consumer Electronics Show on whether another remote/hybridized CES worked, what didn’t and what themes emerged in terms of new, innovative tech.
  • January 11: An interview between Kimberly and Monique Mrazek, from the World Bank’s International Finance Corporation, to discuss femtech’s (tech centered around women’s health) presence at CES and the larger state of femtech innovation right now.

On Point

  • January 10: Nearly a thousand homes were lost in wildfires that swept between Denver and Boulder, Colorado at the end of last month. We find out how urban and suburban districts in the West are facing development plans, regulations and having to retrofit homes as fire dangers grow – and, who’s already doing this work
  • January 11: The US is averaging more than 300,000 new COVID cases each day. That is the highest since the pandemic began. Chicago, Miami, Newark, Memphis, New Orleans, Atlanta, and San Juan are all seeing major surges. But hospitalization rates are not keeping up. Are case numbers the wrong way to look at the pandemic. What’s the best measure to make sense of the pandemic now?
  • January 12: We explore what the conviction of Theranos founder, Elizabeth Holmes, on four counts of wire fraud and conspiracy for misleading investors, tells us about Silicon Valley start-up culture and what the larger consequences are of its pervasive “fake it ‘til you make it” attitude.

Classical

Performance Today

  • Week of January 10: Performance Today will talk to clarinetist Anthony McGill & pianist Gloria Chen about Peace, a new work by Jessie Montgomery written during the first lockdown of the pandemic in May 2020.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

January 14 – 1977

  • The Punk Rock and New Wave Explosion was underway with debuts from The Clash and Elvis Costello. Saturday Night Fever was soon to be an international phenomenon, Fleetwood Mac released Rumors which went on to become one of the best-selling albums and Linda Ronstadt later displaced the Mighty Mac from the top spot with her Simple Dreams effort. Bob Marley released perhaps his finest work, the world mourned the loss of Elvis Presley, who died at Graceland and a plane carrying the band Lynyrd Skynyrd crashed killing the band’s singer Ronnie Van Zandt, guitarist Steve Gaines and his sister singer Cassie Gaines. Donna Summer recorded the influential “I Feel Love,” while The Commodores had another big “crossover” hit.
  • Outside the world of music, The Big Apple went dark during the New York City Blackout and the first Star Wars film was released.

The Splendid Table

Encore episode – January 14

  • Soup is on this week with award-winning chef Jenn Louis and her new book, The Chicken Soup Manifesto. Jenn answers listener questions and brings us her uniquely global take on chicken soup. She’s collected recipes from all over the world, from Algeria to Colombia to Panama.
  • Then, the Splendid Table staff holds a taste-off of store-bought chicken stock. Listeners can tune in to find out who the winner is.

Timely Selections

Digital / Marketing tool from the BBC World Service

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these shareable videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and follow the link below to explore the library of videos!

VIEW VIDEOS HERE

Questions? Reach out to your Station Relations Representative.

Dating While Gray: Older Bodies and Brains in Love

Broadcast Window: January 1, 2022 – March 31, 2022

Length: One hour

Young adults don’t have exclusive rights to romance and sexual desire. But the brains and bodies of older people remain under-represented in narratives about love, so it’s easy to forget that intimacy doesn’t end after 50. While older people contend with all kinds of physical and mental changes, gray daters also are driven by spontaneous emotions and primal urges — sometimes manifesting in behavior that proves no, we aren’t always old enough to know better.

In this special hour of audio, you’ll hear from single people 50 and older dealing with these issues as well as experts including noted anthropologist Helen Fisher; sex journalist Michael Castleman, author of “Sizzling Sex for Life: Everything You Need to Know to Maximize Erotic Pleasure at Any Age”; Dr. Arthur Burnett, whose original research helped lead to the development of Viagra; and sexuality counselor Kathryn Ellis, who developed the Occupational Therapy Sexuality and Intimacy Clinic at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Your week at a glance: January 3-9

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

BBC World Service

  • Note: Due to challenges from the rise in Covid cases in the UK, the BBC is implementing temporary schedule changes. This includes changes to the 9 p.m. and 11 p.m. ET editions of The Newsroom, in addition to other schedule changes. This schedule change began Monday, December 20 and is due to run until Sunday, January 9, and will be reviewed again in early January. The BBC is aiming to have these editions of The Newsroom back on-air as soon as possible. An updated schedule is available online.

Marketplace

Week of January 3

Marketplace (PM)

  • We check in with our small business retailers in Georgia, Maine, and North Carolina.
  • With soaring demand for natural gas around the world, and soaring prices to match, the gas industry in the US is building up its ability to liquefy natural gas (LNG) and load it onto container ships. Marketplace’s Andy Uhler went to southern Louisiana — LNG central — to look at how the global boom is playing out on the ground around the LNG terminals.

Marketplace Tech

  • Kimberly Adams hosts through January.
  • January 3: Kimberly Adams and Futurist Amy Webb talk about tech trends we should pay attention to in 2022.
  • January 4: Kimberly Adams will speak with Jessica Lee, privacy expert and partner at the Law Firm Loeb & Loeb, on the privacy issues facing the Metaverse as companies continue to enter this new space and stake their “claims.”

The Daily

Please note – these plans for the anniversary of the attack on the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021 may change in the final stages of production. Stations should consult ContentDepot rundowns and promos for the most up-to-date info next week.

  • January 5: The political story on Jan. 6, 2021, which will focus mainly on the GOP. The Daily looks at how the reaction to the events of that day went from outrage among some moderate Republicans, to a muted disapproval, to now – a narrative in some corners of the party that the people who took part in it were patriots defending democracy. Likely guest: Catie Edmondson.
  • January 6: Georgia was pivotal in the 2020 election, and it has also been the state with some of the most sweeping changes to its election rules and vote counting apparatus in the nation. The Daily will report on what those changes would mean in another close election. Likely guest: Richard Faussett.
  • January 7: The majority of people who made up the mob that stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021 have been charged with non-violent offenses – essentially trespassing. Most had no criminal background and only a small minority were members of a militia or right-wing group. In general, they saw themselves as good neighbors and rule abiding citizens. But without them, the attack on the Capitol never takes place. So, who are these rioters? What drew them to Washington? We hear from one of them, in his own words through the transcripts of an FBI interrogation, and analyze the forces at work that day – and how a kind of mass radicalization is shaping America. Likely guest: Alan Feuer.

On Point

  • January 3: In late December, Matthew Greene from Syracuse, New York, pleaded guilty to storming the US Capitol along with fellow members of the Proud Boys on January 6th. As part of a plea deal, he is cooperating with the authorities. In mid-December, Florida resident Robert Palmer was sentenced to more than five years in prison for throwing a fire extinguisher at a law enforcement officer at the Capitol Hill riot. They are just two of more than 700 people who have been charged in what is the largest investigation in the history of the Department of Justice. On Point takes a close look into that investigation, asking who has been charged, and with what, to understand what it’s revealing about the attack on the Capitol on Jan 6, 2021.
  • January 4: Financial Times global business columnist, Rana Foroohar, and Washington Post personal finance columnist, Michelle Singletary (aka On Point’s Money Ladies) join Meghna to hear what we should expect for our personal finances for the coming year.
  • January 5: West Virginia senator, Joe Manchin, says he won’t vote for President Biden’s Build Back Better plan over concerns of how much it would cost. But the union that represents coal miners in the state has urged him to reconsider. In a statement it says the bill would extend benefits to coal miners suffering from black lung disease and offer tax incentives for manufacturers to build factories and employ miners who have lost their jobs. We’ll take a close look at what Build Back Better would have meant for the people of West Virginia and whether that might offer some clue to how a revised bill might look that would get Sen. Manchin’s support.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

January 7 – 2002

  • It was the year Eminem told his story in the film soundtrack to 8 Mile and there was no sophomore slump for the band Coldplay, who issued their 2nd effort A Rush of Blood to the Head. It was a year of ups and downs for the band Wilco, who ultimately released what many call the best album of their career called Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, Oklahoma City vets The Flaming Lips released perhaps their best yet, Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots and we were first introduced to Norah Jones, who released one of the best-selling albums of the year. Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings dropped their debut & kickstarted the retro-soul movement, LCD Soundsystem released the aging hipster anthem, “Losing My Edge,” Johnny Cash was still on this earth and we lost Joey Ramone in 2001, although his parting gift to us was released in 2002.
  • Outside the world of music, 10 died in the Washington, DC sniper killings. In the sports world, the Los Angeles Lakers swept the New Jersey Nets to win their third straight NBA title, and Shaquille O’Neal wins his third straight MVP. American Idol debuts in the US, and Kelly Clarkson was the season 1 winner.

The Splendid Table

NEW episode – January 7

  • We’re spending an hour with culinary historian Jessica B. Harris.
  • Jessica has spent much of her life researching the food and foodways of the African Diaspora. She is the author of twelve books including, Iron Pots and Wooden Spoon: Africa’s Gifts to New World Cooking, her memoir My Soul Looks Back and High on the Hog: A Culinary Journey from Africa to America. High on the Hog was made into a Netflix documentary in 2021.

Timely Selections

Digital / Marketing tool from the BBC World Service

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these shareable videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and follow the link below to explore the library of videos!

VIEW VIDEOS HERE

Questions? Reach out to your Station Relations Representative.

2021 Remembered from the Current

Broadcast Window: December 13, 2021 – January 9, 2022

Length: One hour

Join The Current in honoring the life, music, and legacy of artists we lost this year with 2021 Remembered from The Current. This hour-long musical tribute is a celebration of all sounds – from indie to influential – and the perfect way for music lovers to unite in paying homage to the artists who have shaped music history.

From musicians and producers to industry icons, the playlist will feature legends like Charlie Watts, Don Everly, Nanci Griffith, Bunny Wailer, Biz Markie, and many more. Host Mac Wilson will highlight milestones in each artist’s life and career, explore their lasting impact on the music world, and spin their most beloved songs. The program will have a music-to-talk ratio 60/40.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Your week at a glance: December 27 – January 2

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

BBC World Service

  • December 31: The four-minute module Global View will take a look at international media coverage of major U.S. stories in 2021:
    • Nigeria and Europe on the Jan 6 storming of the capitol
    • South African commentary about the murder conviction of Derek Chauvin
    • Reaction to the US withdrawal from Afghanistan from the Taliban and Russia
  • Note: Due to challenges from the rise in Covid cases in the UK, the BBC is implementing temporary schedule changes. This includes changes to the 9 p.m. and 11 p.m. ET editions of The Newsroom, in addition to other schedule changes. This will start Monday, December 20 and is due to run until Sunday, January 9, and will be reviewed again in early January. The BBC is aiming to have these editions of The Newsroom back on-air as soon as possible. An updated schedule is available online.

Marketplace

Week of December 27

Marketplace (PM)

  • Kimberly talks to Megan Devine, psychotherapist and author of “It’s Ok to Not Be Ok” about how the language of grief has changed, two years into the pandemic economy.
  • The country’s historically Black colleges and universities are funneling stimulus money directly to students, wiping out loans and past-due fees. But one is going a step further with its financial assistance. Blake Farmer of WPLN in Nashville reports.

Marketplace Tech

  • Kimberly Adams hosts through the month of December.
  • December 28: Encore episode from Kimberly Adams about a special wastewater treatment facility, DC Water’s Blue Plains, that uses thermal hydrolysis to turn waste into gas and heat that can be captured and reused for energy, as well as create safe fertilizer for use with food crops.
  • December 30: Encore episode of an interview between Kimberly Adams and NASA’s Chief Science Data Officer, Kevin Murphy, on their earth sciences division’s plans to move their huge and still growing cache of climate and environmental data to larger cloud storage base and how that could make the data easier to access for anyone, potentially.

The Daily

  • NOTE: Each encore episode will also include new reporting, checking in with the characters from the original story to see where they are since the story was first reported. Each episode will also begin with an updated billboard from Michael Barbaro:

HEY, IT’S MICHAEL. THIS WEEK, THE DAILY IS REVISITING SOME OF OUR FAVORITE EPISODES OF THE YEAR … AND HEARING WHAT’S HAPPENED IN THE TIME SINCE THEY FIRST RAN. TODAY…WE RETURN TO….[DESCRIPTION OF STORY]. IT’S [DATE]

On Point

  • December 27: ‘The Genetic Lottery,’ Katheryn Paige Harden considers a new moral framework for genetics (Air Date: 9/17/21)

    A polygenic score. Have you heard of it? Researcher Kathryn Paige Harden says it’s a set of DNA variants added up into a single number. It can predict what math class you get tracked into high school, your likelihood of graduating from college,” she says, “And it predicts those things even above and beyond you’re controlling–something like family income.” A new moral framework for how we talk about genetics.

  • December 29: High conflict and how to free yourself from it (Air Date: 4/12/21)

    Investigative journalist Amanda Ripley wanted to understand the sources of human conflict. So she studied it for more than four years. She detected a strong pattern to the most intractable conflicts, big and small. She found it in divorces, gang violence and political polarization. From the personal to the tribal, we discuss high conflict, and how to pull free of it.

  • December 30: multi-level marketing companies and the disinformation they sell (Air Date: 9/30/21)

    Multi-level marketing distributors promise big money in a way that fits into your life. But for many people who sign up, they quickly discover a problem. Their entire industry is founded on disinformation–and that disinformation is metastasizing into conspiracy theories.

  • December 31: from unknown successes to personal disillusionment: what the public doesn’t know about Colin Powell (Air Date: 10/22/21)

    For more than a decade Retired Colonel Lawrence Wilkerson stood at Colin Powell’s side. Wilkerson served as Powell’s chief of staff both at the Joint Chiefs, and from 2002 to 2005, when Powell was Secretary of State. In an exclusive conversation with host Meghna Chakrabarti, Wilkerson shares what the public doesn’t know about Colin Powell, including major diplomatic successes that never made it into the public eye. He also shares Powell’s internal conflict, blind spots, and disillusionment over his role in the Iraq war.

Classical

Performance Today

  • December 27: Performance Today will have music representing the seven principles of Kwanza.
  • January 1-2: PT will distribute a special New Year’s Day program. Typically, just one program is distributed for weekend broadcasts. However, for stations that broadcast PT Weekend on Sundays, we will also make a non-holiday program available for broadcast on Jan 2. This will be posted in the evergreen episode section of ContentDepot; files will be posted next Tuesday, December 28.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

December 30 – 1981

  • The Time Machine invades 1981 this time. Synth-pop and new-wave were emerging with albums by Devo, Soft Cell, The Go-Go’s and the Police. Rock still rolled with releases by the Rolling Stones, Stevie Nicks, Tom Petty & Joan Jett and the Blackhearts while Rush created their defining track of the early 80’s. There were funky hits from Rick James and Grace Jones and Talking Heads offshoot Tom Tom Club. The ska band The Specials released one of England’s biggest songs of the year. Speaking of England, the royal wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana captured our imaginations.

    In the States, Ronald Reagan became president. Later in the year he and his press secretary James Brady were shot. Both survived. Sandra Day O’Connor became the first Woman to serve on the US Supreme Court and the Most Trusted man in America Walter Cronkite, retired as anchor of CBS News. It was a big year for cable TV, both HBO and MTV signed on. It’s all 1981, our year on this episode of Time Machine from the Current.

The Splendid Table

  • December 31 – ENCORE EPISODE: It’s an hour with renown Philadelphia chef and author of Israeli Soul and Zahav, Michael Solomonov. We hear about what puts the soul into Israeli food, we get the recipe for his deliciously addictive tehina shake, Michael and Francis swap disaster stories and take on callers as a team.

Timely Selections

Digital / Marketing tool from the BBC World Service

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these shareable videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and follow the link below to explore the library of videos!

VIEW VIDEOS HERE


Questions? Reach out to your Station Relations Representative.

Hygge Holiday: Cozy Classics

Broadcast Window: December 1, 2021 – January 31, 2022

Length: One hour

Join host Elena See for an hour-long program of nostalgic favorites for the winter season. Programming includes favorites from Tchaikovsky, Vivaldi, Debussy and Blake.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

Your week at a glance: December 20-26

Here are the latest updates for upcoming programs. PLEASE NOTE: All details are subject to change. Additional details will be shared via ContentDepot as they become available.

Use the links below to visit our dedicated program pages, where you’ll find show logos, digital assets and more.


News

BBC World Service

  • December 25 and 26: BBC Newshour will be running a series of longer interviews with those who took part in some of the notable news events of 2021.
  • Note: Due to challenges from the rise in Covid cases in the UK, the BBC is implementing temporary schedule changes. This includes changes to the 9 p.m. and 11 p.m. ET editions of The Newsroom, in addition to other schedule changes. This will start Monday, December 20 and is due to run until Sunday, January 9, and will be reviewed again in early January. The BBC is aiming to have these editions of The Newsroom back on-air as soon as possible. An updated schedule is available online.

Marketplace

Week of December 20

Marketplace (PM)

  • Kai talks with Dallas Taylor, host of “Twenty Thousand Hertz” about the process behind audio logos. (HBO, 20th Century Fox, Netflix, etc.)

Marketplace Tech

  • Kimberly Adams hosts through the month of December.
  • December 20: Tech will feature an interview with Sam Houston, a senior vehicles analyst at the Union of Concerned Scientists, a non-profit science advocacy organization, about the Biden Administration’s plan to increase the number of EV charging stations in the country.
  • December 21: Kimberly speaks with Jana Arbanas, Deloitte’s telecom, media and entertainment sector leader, on the 50th anniversary of the video game console and how that market has changed since the first one was released.

The Daily

  • December 20-21: There will be a two-part short series profiling a young Afghan woman’s story and how her life was transformed following the Taliban takeover of the country. Note: This originally ran on the podcast as “The Decision of My Life” on October 13 but did not air on broadcast.
  • December 24: The Daily is planning a “Year in Sound” episode – watch ContentDepot for more updates.

On Point

  • December 20: The law protecting children online hasn’t been updated in twenty years. Meanwhile, Big Tech has been cashing in on our children’s screen time. We explore how they’re doing that and how Congress might finally be about to say enough is enough.
  • December 21: A recent Gallup poll found the highest level of support for unions since 1965 as workers at major companies like Starbucks have pushed to unionize for the first time and workers at Kellog’s have undertaken lengthy strike action. On Point explores what’s driving this surge in momentum for employee power and rights and how the demands of union members are changing.
  • December 22: The metaverse – the virtual reality universe that mirrors our own — is growing fast. Musicians like Justin Bieber are putting on live concerts in the metaverse and a metaverse real estate company has been valued in the millions of dollars. Technology experts predict it will become increasingly integrated into our lives and there will be a time when we live in reality and virtually at the same time. What’s to stop technology progressing to the point that we can’t tell them apart? (Postponed from last week)
  • December 24: why science says you deserve to be happy (Air Date: 10/12/21) The COVID pandemic upended life in almost every way imaginable. It disrupted a lot of things that naturally make us happy,” cognitive scientist Laurie Santos says. The upheaval, the loss, the inequities laid bare by the pandemic has some people questioning: Do I deserve to be happy? Fact: Happiness is not a zero-sum game. So, what is it? What science says about why you deserve to be happy.

Classical

Performance Today

  • December 22: Performance Today will share with listeners the staff’s favorite new holiday albums from 2021.
  • December 23: In what is becoming an annual tradition, Fred Child will read excerpts from Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol set to music
  • December 25: Performance Today has produced a special Christmas Day episode with celebratory music from around the country. For stations that don’t wish to air holiday music on December 26, a new evergreen episode will be uploaded to the Performance Today Weekend page for stations to use instead.

Arts and Culture

Time Machine from The Current

December 24 – 1964

  • The Time Machine bops back to 1964 this time. It was a fab year! You probably bought your first 45 by those lovable mop tops, The Beatles cuz it was the The British Invasion. There were also bands like The Rolling Stones, The Dave Clark, and The Kinks. Meanwhile, in the States, it was the best year yet for Motown with hits from The Temptations, Mary Wells & The Supremes. In the Big Easy, New Orleans there were legendary recordings made by Professor Longhair and Dixie Cups. Buck Owens put the Bakersfield sound on the map and Chuck Berry had no particular place to go. Chuck’s hometown team, the St. Louis Cardinals defeated the Yankees to win the World Series, pitcher Bob Gibson dominated and was voted MVP. LBJ defeated Goldwater in a Landslide. Jeopardy! first aired with original host Art Fleming. Bonanza was the top show on TV.

The Splendid Table

Encore episode – December 24:

  • We’re getting ready for the holidays with the culinary Queen herself, Ina Garten. Her new book is Modern Comfort Food.
  • Then, Food 52’s Kristen Miglore brings in some of her favorite Genius recipes of the year. Her new podcast is Genius Recipe Tapes.

Timely Selections

Digital / Marketing tool from the BBC World Service

All BBC affiliated stations have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Use these shareable videos to bolster your social platforms. Set up your account to access the BBC Media Partner Centre and follow the link below to explore the library of videos!

VIEW VIDEOS HERE

Questions? Reach out to your Station Relations Representative.

A Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols

Broadcast Window: December 24 – 25, 2021

Length: Two hours

A Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols presents your audience with an opportunity to share in a live, world-wide Christmas Eve broadcast of a service of Biblical readings, carols, and related seasonal Classical music. This special will be presented by one of the world’s foremost choirs of men and boys and performed in an acoustically and architecturally renowned venue, the 500-year-old Chapel of King’s College, Cambridge, England.

Questions? Please contact your Station Representative.

BBC Monthly: January Docs, Specials and Video Selections

Coming in January 2022

Featuring voices from across the U.S. and around the globe, connect your audience to the world with these unique stories and perspectives. This month, we unveil responses to the on-going pandemic with political leaders and questioners in Europe, delve into Chicago’s avant-jazz scene and discover the influence of animals and nature and the steps people are taking towards conservation and research. See below for details.

Visit our website to learn more, and find links to ContentDepot for programs, promos and billboards.

As a BBC affiliate, you have access to rights-cleared videos produced by the BBC. Visit the BBC Media Partner Centre to take advantage of this opportunity and increase your social media presence with consistent, shareable videos centering topics aligned with your audience’s interests.

See below for a curated selection of high performing videos.


Docs and Specials

World Questions: COVID-19 and Europe

One hour
January 15 – February 11, 2022

The epicentre of the pandemic right now is Europe. Many European countries are now restricting the freedoms of the unvaccinated, and Austria plans to make the COVID vaccine compulsory from February the 1st. As tough new policies are implemented, World Questions debates the response to the pandemic with political leaders and questioners from across the continent.

Music Life: The Great Black Music Symposium

One hour
January 15 – February 28, 2022

Where music stars discuss how they make their music. Delving into Chicago’s avant-jazz scene, Angel Bat Dawid invites her friends to discuss major issues in their art. They consider the importance of not conforming, the struggle to find money to do what you love, and the experience of being diasporic African and its influence on your music.

Forest Fear

One hour
January 22 – 28, 2022

Environmental journalist Lucy Jordan lives in Brazil with her young family. She wants to understand our impact on diverse, wildlife-rich ecosystems and how that may trigger future “spill over” diseases that have their origins in animal hosts.


Monthly BBC Video Selections:

View the instructional guide and social media best practices resource available on our website. Please share all BBC videos within two weeks of downloading them on the BBC Media Partner Centre. Click the links and images below to watch and download these videos.

How do reindeer cope with extreme polar seasons?

  • Description: If you struggle to wake up in the winter, you might be envious of the reindeer. Scientists think they may be able to ignore their body clocks, which influence when they feel tired or awake, to help them cope with long Arctic days and nights.
  • Suggested social copy: Reindeer may be able to ignore their body clocks to cope with long days and nights.
  • Duration: 1 minute 45 seconds

Manta rays inspire new device to filter microplastics

  • Description: Wastewater treatment plants release microplastics into the environment, where they accumulate and pose a threat to wildlife. But by studying the way a manta ray feeds on plankton, scientists have designed a filtration system that captures the tiny fragments without getting clogged.
  • Suggested social copy: A look at how manta rays have inspired a new device to filter microplastics.
  • Duration: 1 minute 21 seconds

The man who grew his own Amazon rainforest

  • Description: A corner of the Amazon that had been cleared and used as farmland has been restored to rainforest. The man who owns it, Omar Tello, gave up his job as an accountant and spent 40 years recreating a patch of pristine forest in Ecuador, stretching just a few hundred metres in each direction. He’s trying to encourage other landowners to do the same, so they can turn the tide of deforestation. A film for People Fixing the World by Daniel Gordon Drone footage by Felix Frank.
  • Suggested social copy: Fighting back against destruction in the Amazon: how one man grew a rainforest of his own.
  • Duration: 4 minutes 45 seconds

Announcement — BBC OS Presenter Nuala McGovern | December 14, 2021

A note from Simon Peeks, Head of Journalism | BBC World Service 

Newsday | BBC OS | BBC Minute | Africa Daily | BBC OS Conversations | Ros Atkins On…  

Please join us in congratulating BBC OS presenter Nuala McGovern for her upcoming move to BBC World News TV as a chief presenter. It’s fabulous news for Nuala and we are all delighted for her. 

We all in World Service radio network, however, will miss Nuala. Nuala is a familiar voice to radio audiences around the world. What a time it has been. Suffice to say: she will leave with many great memories; many wonderful trips; memorable conversations and audio moments; and crucially BBC OS in really good form. 

We have been on the ground and witnessed numerous fabulous broadcasts with Nuala over the years including:  US presidential elections and inaugurations, our Trump Towns and Movie Towns series across the US, French and other Euro elections, Ireland’s abortion referendum, Brexit around the UK, Nigeria’s Bring Back Our Girls protest, Syrian migration in Europe…. the list is way longer than that of course. 

Of course there is also the launch of BBC OS Conversations in the past couple of years. And there are the awards that we have shared: with the most recent being at the AIBs for Remembering Those Lost To Covid.  

Nuala will move to BBC World News TV in the New Year. 

While the programme is in good hands with the current production team, we have started work on finding a new presenter for BBC OS and BBC OS Conversations.  As soon as we have completed this process we will communicate to you the news. 

Meanwhile, again, many congratulations to Nuala. I am hopeful, and sure, that she will make the odd guest appearance on OS in the future.

We will also record updated BBC OS generic promos for your use when we have the new presenter in place. Watch your inbox for a ContentDepot notification when this is available.  

A word from “The Daily” | December 14, 2021

Dear Colleagues, 

We hope you all had a wonderful Thanksgiving filled with food, friends, family and fun. Along with our leftovers, we also enjoyed this playful take on The Daily’s signature introduction on TikTok (the clip has over 180,000 likes).  

As we gear up for the winter holidays, we’d like to give you a rundown of what we’ve been up to these past few weeks. 

The Daily’s Dedication to Covering Climate Change 

For the past few months, The Daily has produced a series of climate-related episodes. We’ve told personal stories of individuals and families learning to live with extreme weather events and followed the bumpy road toward passing policy that may help to curb the worst effects of our warming planet. 

In early November, The Daily traveled to Glasgow, where the show covered COP26, the United Nations conference. “We’ve been building to this moment with our climate coverage all year,” Clare Toeniskoetter, a senior producer on The Daily, said. “We tried to go inside the conference to ask the question many people outside it have posed, which is: Will this conference make a difference?” 

You can find a short playlist of some of The Daily’s recent episodes that focus on the real-world effects of the discussions at the conference, as well as our coverage of COP26, here.  

Listeners can expect more coverage of climate change in the new year.  

The Music of The Daily  

Along with on-the-ground reporting and in-depth interviews, original music plays an integral role in how The Daily immerses listeners in some of today’s most important stories.  

On November 10, The Daily brought listeners the story of Martín Zamora, the owner of a funeral parlor in Algeciras, Spain, who has taken on an unusual line of work: He is committed to identifying the bodies of migrants who have washed up on shore, and then getting their bodies back to their homes so that they can be buried. 

Producer Rachelle Bonja, along with our audio fellow Chelsea Daniel, created some of the original music for the episode. Here, you can take a closer listen to two of their songs that were featured in the episode.  

Hearing From Sabrina Tavernise

Over the past few weeks, listeners have been hearing from Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The Times — and one of the guest hosts of The Daily.  

Recent highlights from Sabrina’s hosting duties include an inside look at The Times’s investigation into a deadly, and erroneous, airstrike in Syria that was hidden by the U.S. and deep dive into a Supreme Court case that could transform America’s relationship with guns

What We’re Grateful For: You! 

We’d like to take a moment to thank all of the new stations that we’ve welcomed to The Daily family in recent months. We’re honored to be part of your airwaves every day.  

  • WESA in Pittsburgh, PA  
  • KRCB in Santa Rosa, CA 
  • WLRN in Miami, FL  
  • WITF in Harrisburg, PA
  • KHCC in Wichita, KS
  • KUHF in Houston, TX
  • KCRW in Los Angeles, CA

Until next time, 

-The Daily Team